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D EDD7 100^30 7 

California State Library 



Call No. 



V, 3 3 
lE8a-%3 




fju&e'tc. 




California ^VchcrtiSfr. 




VoJ. 33. 



SAH FBANOISOO, SATUBDAY, JULY 15, 1882. 



N0.1. 



G 



OLD BARS— S90@i»10— RsriSED Silver— lli@U| $ cent, discount. 
Mexican Dollars, 7@7J per cent. disc. nom. 

■ Exchange <>n New York, 5c. # $100 premium ; On London Bank- 
ers, 493d. ; Commercial, 49g@49$d. Paris, sight, 5-12J francs per 
dollar. Eastern Telegrams, 10@5c 

' Price of Money here, 6@10 per cent, per year — bank rate. In the 
open market, 1(0*1$ per month. Demand light. On Bond Security, 
3(5)4 J per cent, per year on Call. 

■ Latest price of Sterling in New York, 486@489. 

PRICES OF LEADING STOCKS AND GOV. BONDS. 

San Francisco July 14, 1H89. 



[ Bid. 



Asked 



Nom 
37 



105 
BO 

90 
LOS 

loo 

110 
101 
LM 

103 
105 

tlftj 
Loa 

125 
L28 



Nom. 

Nom. 
45 
00 
52i 

100 
100 
107 
110 

103 
10S 
126 

105 
107 
119 



128 



Stock* and Bonds. 

WSURASCB COMPANIES. 

Stale Investment 

Home Mutual 

Commercial 

Western 

RAILROADS. 

C.P. It R. Stock 

C. P. R. K. Bonds.. . . 

iCity Railroad 

Omnibus R. R 

N. B. and Mission R. R. . 

Sutter Street R. R 

| Geary Street R. R. 

Central R. R. Co 

1 Market Street R. R 

Clay Street Hill R. R... 

S. F. Gaslight Co 

Oakland Gaslight Co . . 

Sac'to Gaslight Co 

[Califor/a Powder Co ... . 
Giant Powder Co (new tttck) 

! Atlantic Giant Powder 

Gold and Stock Teleg'o Co 
S. V. W. W. Co. 's Stock... 
S. V. W. W. Co' Bonds ... . 
■ Pacific Coast S. S. Co*s Stock 
California Street R R. 



Bid. 



Asked 



75 

97 

50 
Nom. 
Nom. 

65* 

31 

52) 
115 
103 

65 

64} 
112 
118J 

108 



125 



128 
112 



118 



Nom. 
Nom. 

65} 
31$ 
55 

105 
65} 
65* 

115 

120 

112 

45, 45}. 



Stocks and Bonds. 
una 
Cat. Stat* Bonds, 6*8/57 . . . . j 105 
S. F. City A Co. B*d». «8,'6a: Nom. 
S. F. City* Co. B'ds,7fl ... " 

Montg'y Av. Bends 

Dupont Street Bonds 

Sacramento. City Bonds 

Stockton City Bonds 

Yuba County Bonds 

Marysville City Bonds 

Santa Clara Co. Bonds 

Los Angeles County Bonds. 

Los Angeles City Bonds 

Virg'a & Truck ee R. R. Bds. 
Nevada Co. N. G. R. R. Bda 
Oakland City Bonds . 
Oregon B& N. Bonds, 6s.. 

S. P. R. R. Bonds 

U S.4S. 

BANKS. 

Bank of California 

Pacific Bank 

First National . 

INBCRASCR COMPANIKS. 

Union 123 

Fireman's Fund 128 

California ' 125 

Pacific Rolling Mills, 115, 122}. Cala. Dry Dock, 55, 60. Safe Deposit Co. 

Vulcan Powder, 66}. 67}. 

There will be a large amount paid in dividends to-morrow, which wilL 
no donbt, strengthen the price of standard securities, even at their pres- 
ent high price. There has been a large business done in the various Pow- 
der stocks during the week. Andrew Bated, 312 California at. 

Two New Steamships. — The Oceanic Steamship Company, through 
its agents, Messrs. J. D. Spreckles & Co., have contracted with William 
Cramp & Sons, of Philadelphia, for two elegant new steamships, to be put 
on the line between here and Honolulu. The new ships will be models of 
naval architecture. They will be each 320 feet long, 41 feet beam and 
26 faet depth of bold. Each has capacity of 104 first-class passengers, and 
a carrying capacity of 2,300 tons dead weight on a draft not to exceed 20 
feet. The engines will indicate 2,000 horse-power, and a speed of 34 
knots is guaranteed. The steamers will be magnificently fitted, and will 
no doubt be a credit to their builders, as they will to the service in* which, 
they are to be engaged. 

A New Enterprise— It is reported that J. M. Scott and Leland 
Stanford are at the head of a movement which designs establishing 
cast-steel works in Oakland, with a mill at Sacramento. The enterprise 
will be in the hands of a company the capital stock of which will amount 
to $2,675,000. The iron will come from the Clipper Gap iron mills, which 
axe said to have been purchased for $432,115.45. The number of Bhares 
is 26,750, and 15,900 have been sold, leaving 10,760 yet on the market. 
It is said 6,000 shares will be purchased by Sacramento capitalists, if the 
works be located in that city, but there is a preference on the part of the 
owners to locate in Oakland. 

Last week, in discussing the Shipping Commissioner's office, we men- 
tioned the fact that "Dick" Chute's wife received a valuable present of 
jewelry from the boarding masters (otherwise the sailor plunderers) of 
this port Mr. Chute, on behalf of his wife, denies this statement. He 
says that he has received valuable diamonds from the admiring board- 
ing masters, but that his wife has not. 

Grain Charters.— Ship Edward O'Brien, 1,803 tonB, Liverpool, £2 7s. 
6d.; if to Cork for orders, U. K. or Continent, £2 10s. Ship Charmer, to 
Liverpool direct, £2 12s. British ship Carnarvonshire, 1,303 tons, wheat, 
to Cork, £2 lis. 3d. British bark Scottish Wizard, 1,209 tons, wheat, to 
Cork, £2 18s. 9d. Ship H. S. Gregory, now at Tacoma, wheat from 
Portland to Cork, £2 7s. 6d. Ship Matilda, now at Victoria, loads lum- 
ber on Puget Sound for "Valparaiso. 

From Celebes Island, East Indies.— The schooner Pearl, 110 days 
from above Island via Calvert Islands 53 days, has arrived, consigned to 
A. P. Lorentzen, with cassia and cocoanuts. 

Entered at the Post- Office at San Francisco, Cal., as Second-Class 
Matter. 



MARRIOTT'S AEROPLANE COMPANY, 

For Navigating; the Air. 

Office of the Aeroplane Company for Navigating the Air, 609 Mer- 
chant street. Office hours from 1 to 2 p.m. 



Orders for Engraving- In tbe Pboto-Eutrravlag Process can 
now be executed at tbe "STew§ "Letter*" Office lor less than 
balf the cost of Wood Engraving-, and In one-hair the time. 
Remember, we famish a hard metal Electrotype ready for 
the Press. 

r^r- With this number of the "News Letter,' '* we issue an Illus- 
trated Eight-Page Postscript, entitled THE BOVT>OIM, without 
which the paper is not complete. See that you get it, 

TABLE OF CONTENTS. 



"Albion" 20 

An Elephant's Portrait 4 

Around San Jose 3 

Biz 18 

Campaign Echoes 2 

Coal Deposit of Puget Sound 4 

Comments on Foreign Affairs 20 

Cradle, Altar and Tomb 14 

De Lam' a Strayin' (Poetry) 5 

Egypt 10 

Electricity, Etc -. 5 

Fashion's Voice 10 

Froude on the South African Question. 

Foreign Notes 14 

Local Notes 14 

L'anii De La Uaison 13 

Mining Experts 15 

Notabilia 17 

Pure Baking Powder 15 



Pleasure's Wand 6 

Pacific Coast and Eastern Notes 14 

Robeson's Defense 10 

Real Estate Transactions 16 

Society 3 

Sunbeams 12 

Sporting Items 7 

Towu Crier 11 

The New Bank Commissioner 10 

The Love of the Past (Poetry) 13 

The American Pasha 10 

To a Doll (Poetry) 9 

The Result of an Accident 3 

The Bulletin and the Supreme Court. . 2 

TheSphynx Speaks (Poetry) 2 

The Fourteenth of July (Poetry) 19 

The Late J. R. Russell 9 

The World, the Flesh and the Devil 8 

Whittier on Longfellow (Poetry) 4 



Meteorological Summary, week ending 7:58 P. H., Thursday, July 
13th:— Highest barometer, 30.068— 12th; lowest, 29.850— 6th ; average 
during the week, 29.976 ; maximum temperature, 73" — 9th ; minimum, 
52.5 — 10th ; average during the week, 58.8 ; highest relative humidity, 96 
per cent. — 10th and 11th : lowest relative humidity, 43 per cent.— 8th ; 
average during the week, 77.3 : prevailing direction of wind, weBt; max- 
imum hourly velocity of wind, 34 miles, west— 12th ; average weather 
during the week, fair ; rainfall during the week, .00 ; total rainfall, sea- 
son of 1882-83, 0.00 inches. 

Latest from tbe Merchant's Exchange. — New York, July 14, 
1882. United States Bonds-48, 118£ ; 4£s, 114 ; ex-5s, 101J; ex-6s, 100|. 
Sterling Exchange, 4 86@4 89. Pacific Mail,—. Wheat, 132@136; West- 
ern Union, 84§. Hides, 234@24. Wool — Spring, fine, 20 @ 32; Burry, 
15@20 ; Pulled, 20@45 ; Fall Clips, 15@18 ; Burry, 12@14. Lon- 
don, July 14.— Liverpool Wheat Market, 10s. 3d.@10s.6d., CaL; 10a. 4d.@ 
10s. lid. Red Am. Spring. Bonds, 4s, 122; 4£s, 116J; ex-6s, 103. Consols, 
99 7-16@984. Money, 99 7-16 ; acct., 99i. Silver, 51|. 

Justice S. J. Field. — One of the noted features on the street just 
now is that of the Hon. S. J. Field, Associate Justice of the Supreme 
Court of the United States. Judge Field was in years gone by the lead- 
ing lawyer at Marysville, and his long legal contest with Judge Turner, 
a brother of Vi Turner, and, like him, somewhat beligerent, is well re- 
membered by the older members of the bar of this city. 

The many friends of Mr. and Mrs. M. E. Gonzales, of 510 Franklin 
street, will learn with pain that they have just lost by death their infant 
daughter, an interesting child of 11 months. The funeral will take place 
to-day from the residence of the bereaved parents, who have the heartfelt 
sympathy of the co mmunity. 

Owing to the great pressure on our space, we are obliged to hold over 
an interesting article on " Assessment Mines," and another relating to 
the *' Society of California Pioneers." 

£3 to Cork for Orders. — This is the rate paid at the close for wheat 
to Cork, U. K. Br. ship Loch Keu (iron), £3. Br. iron ship Serial Win, 
1115, wheat, Cork, U. K., £3. This advance is rather unexpected at this 
early date, but is the natural result of European strife and wet and cloudy 
weather in Great Bri tain. 

Mr. Robert Ballard, Chief Engineer of the Central and Northern 
Railway Division of the colony of Queensland, Australia, arrived by the 
last Australian Bteamer. Mr. Ballard is a very distinguished member of 
his profession. He is now on his way to England. 

From Liverpool — The ship A. McCallum has arrived, 189 days from 
Liverpool, with coa.1, 1660 tons, and 200 tons salt, to J. W. Grace & Co. 

From Hamburg. — The Geo. Barb AUter, 200 days, has arrived after 
a long passage, bringing a full cargo of iron, etc., to Wolff & Reinhold. 

"London, July 14.— Latest Price of Consols. 99 7-16Q99 1-2. 



Printed and Published by the Proprietor, Frederick Harriott, 607 to 615 Merchant Street, San Francisco, California. 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER AND 



July 16, 1882. 



THE SPHTNX SPEAKS. 
Whew! What a whiff comes from the pyramids! 

The bandaged mummies have escaped their cover; 
The PharoahB have kicked off their coffin-lids, 

And in their graves are gravely turning over. 
Whist! What's the matter with the Sphynx ? 

Her stony face, methinks, finds relaxation ; 
Behold! the time-bruised Virgin surely winks — 

As if she rather liked the situation. 
Hush ! Let her speak who ne'er before has spoken. 

She whispers: "Egypt, cast thy scepter down; 
Thy shield is stained, thy given word is broken, 

And Isaac Levy has in pledge thy crown. 
*' The Rothschilds, Solomons and Abrams own you — 

All Israel for your ancient carcass frets — 
You have to take whatever bone is thrown you, 

Or Btarve upon the interest of your debts. 
" When from your shores the Jews fled, under Moses, 

Your hosts pursued, in hopes to bring them back ; 
Now, uninvited, alt the ponderous noses 

Of Israel's children sniff upon your track. 
" Bankrupt, dishonored — Egypt, what is left you? 

Not e'en a god whom you can well invoke. 
Of even old Osiris they've bereft you — 

Your sacred Bull now wears the John Bull yoke. 
" But think not," saith the Sphynx, " that I'm demented— 

I'm simply weary, Egypt, of your ways, 
And, being old and feeble, am contented 

Under the British flag to end my dayB." 

THE BULLETIN AND THE SUPREME COURT. 

The Evening Bulletin is the Don Quixotte of the San Francisco 

press. Having, during the life of Ralston, declared war against the 
Spring Valley Water Works because he was one of its principal share- 
holders, it has since his death followed bis successors in interest with 
crazy vindictiveness. It has thrown away the scabbard, and with its 
metaphorical but edgeloss sword it has sawed the air in every conceiva- 
ble direction. Its gyrations have afforded a vast deal of amusement to 
those readers who have bad the patience to waste time over its bombastic 
thunderings. 

When the Constitutional Convention adopted the article requiring local 
authorities to fix the water rates to be paid by the city and its in- 
habitants, Den Quixotte blew a bugle blast, and told the people that if 
they adopted it, free water, for the protection of property from fire, at the 
cost of water consumers, would be abolished. The people took the same 
view, and manifested their approval of the Constitution by giving it an 
enormous majority vote. Thereupon the valiant kniaht flashed his sword 
in the opposite direction, and presented the other side of his shield, upon 
which wan inscribed: "Free water is not abolished. The statute of 1858 
was a solemn, irrevocable contract, which no New Constitution can im- 
pair." 

The Courts held that the Supervisors must fix the water rates, where- 
upon this self-constituted champion declared that they might fix rates for 
the people but not for property, and that no man should be elected to the 
office of Supervisor who did not pledge himself to construe the Constitu- 
tion to mean that property should have water free. Some candidates 
were frightened iuto submission, gave the pledge and were defeated, 
while every one who refused was elected. And now the Supreme Court 
has decided that the Supervisors must fix the rates for the city and for 
the people, and that free water for any purpose has been abolished. 

But our warrior still fights the air, and says: " It will not do to permit 
the decision to stand." He insults the members of the Court by falsely 
charging them with having changed their opinions expressed in previous 
caseB, and is then guilty of illogical inconsistency by demanding a rehear- 
ing and a reversal of their own judgment, so that they might verify his 
charge of vacillation. One of the dissenting Justices is patted on the 
back as a Judge of most " conviucing reasons." Seizing upon this dis- 
senting opinion as a welcome support, the discomfited hero kicks up a 
tremendous dust, as though the contest were not ended, and bellows 
loudly for a renewal of the battle. 

It is time that this stupidity should be no longer allowed to affect the 
public interest, and should cease to interest or amuse. Every question 
relating to the rights of the people and the obligations of the water com- 
pany, which could arise under the new Constitution, has now received a 
judicial interpretation by the Supreme Court and should be no longer agi- 
tated. The city must pay for water for all purposes, and the Supervisors 
must fix the rates to be paid by those who use water for domestic pur- 
poses. If the decision of the Supreme Court be carried to practical re- 
sults, water rates should be lessened thirty per cent, below the rates now 
paid. 

That is the substantial benefit which the people expected to derive from 
the constitutional abolishment of the delusion of free water. But a re- 
duction of the cost of water is not what the Bulletin desires. It would 
greatly prefer that the situation should be oppressive to rate-payers, cre- 
ating disaffection toward the Water Company. It would hope thus to 
gain some moral support of its personal antagonism. It is a vain hope. 
The Bulletin has lost what influence it may once have had, when it almost 
monopolized the local field of journalism. It has always been a malicious 
libeler and a vindictive enemy. Falsehood has been its favorite weapon, 
shaped as abuse or flattery, according to circumstances. Like a coward, 
it has no fixed policy of action, but may cajole to-morrow whom it stab- 
bed to-day. Its opinions are mere expressions of motives and tactics of 
the hour. Only the weak yield to its flattery, only the vulnerable to its 
threats. Its attempt now to influence the members of the Supreme Court 
by its false criticism of their opinions is an impotent act, inspired by 
chagrin, and proof how devilish a wicked and discomfited newspaper 
can be. 

If you want to learn how to dance, read J. William Frazer's adver- 
tisement in this paper to-day. The terms are very low — no one can grum- 
ble at such rates, if your means are limited. 



CAMPAIGN ECHOES. 

The Democracy of this city indulged in a grand rally at Union Hall 
on Saturday evening last, for the purpose of ratifying " the ticket," that 
is to say, the meeting was designated a 4 * grand rally," but why thiB was 
bo it is difficult to understand. Using words in their ordinary sense, it 
was not a grand rally; it was an ordinary campaign meeting, attended by 
a not over numerous or over enthusiastic audience. 



And right here is a good place to suggest to the managers of the 
" grand old party " that if a little more talent were exhibited in " getting 
up " their meetings, they would not merely be more successful as meet- 
ings, but would accomplish greater results. The object in holding public 
meetings for the discussion of public affairs is to convince opponents and 
waverers— particularly the latter. The balance of political power is al- 
ways in the hands of those intelligent people who are not slaves to a polit- 
ical name or battle-cry, and that class wonld attend public meetings if 
proper provision were made for their accommodation and entertainment. 
They will crowd a building like the Grand Opera House to listen to able 
men discussing affairs of state, but they won't go to a hall and stand 
among unwashed, uncombed individuals (who make the air redolent with 
the fumes of short, black pipes, and whose brogan-clad feet keep up a 
continuous clatter), and to listen to prancing war-horses talking nonsense. 
o 

The first partof Saturday's meeting was the reading of a series of letters 
from gentlemen who were present in the spirit but absent in body. 
With one exception, all of these letters tended to establish the fact 
that the Democrats are much better writers than speakers. The one 
exception was that of Mr. Clay W. Taylor. Whether the young gentle- 
man who undertook to read the communication omitted to learn that 
useful accomplishment, or whether Mr. Taylor writes an atrociously 
bad hand, deponent sayeth not, but the ground and lofty tumbling over 
words and sentences which resulted from one or other — or both — of 
these causes was so interesting that the admirable sentiments which Mr. 
Taylor may have been expressing were utterly lost. 
o 

General Stoneman " offered," to use bis own phrase, " a few common- 
place remarks," which he read from paper. Why he should have gone to 
the trouble of writing down remarks which were few and commonplace 
passes comprehension, but there is no doubt but that they were few and 
commonplace, and that he did write them down. The only thing he said 
that was of any interest was to intimate that he intended to shape his 
course so as not to "necessitate excuses, apologies or explanations." In 
other words, he gave notice that, although he was a somewhat garrulous 
old gentleman, he would in this campaign, no matter how much he might 
talk, say nothing. If it be admitted that the highest object in politics 
and statescraft is to win elections, then the General's decision is admirable; 
but, all the same, he pays himself a very left-banded compliment when 
he admits that, in order to avoid contributing to his own defeat, it is 
necessary for him to put a padlock on his mouth. 
o 

John Daggett, the candidate for Lieutenant-Governor, is said to be one 
of the ablest debaters in the State. His specialty is an incisive five or 
ten-minute speech. While he is capable of more elaborate efforts, they 
are not exactly in his line. On Saturday last he was nervous and over- 
powered. He was nervous from the fact that he was making bis first 
appearance before a metropolitan audience, and he was overpowered with 
the regulation suit of broadcloth which he wore. The consequence was, 
he said nothing that was worth listening to. When Mr. Daggett be- 
comes better acquainted with the city Democracy, he will not be nervous 
before it, he will not overpower himself in the respectability of broad- 
cloth when he purposes meeting with it, and then he will say something 
worthy of his reputation. 



Candidates for public office from time to time advance curious argu- 
ments in favor of themselves. In this respect, Charles Sumner, one of 
the candidates for Congress, distinguished himself last Saturday evening. 
He based his claim for a seat in Congress on the fact that he had never 
wet his mustache in Nob Hill soup or champagne. Mr. Sumner might 
have strengthened this remarkable reason by stating that he had often 
been invited by the Nob Hillites to bathe in their soup and champagne, 
and had virtuously declined; but, perhaps, that would not have been 
true. Bye and bye some demagogue will come forward and claim that he 
should be elected President because he has deluged his interior arrange- 
ments in Tar Flat beer and clam chowder. If the fact that a man has not 
been invited to enjoy social intercourse with ladies and gentlemen forms 
a good reason for his elevation to public preferment, then the fact that he 
has been invited to eat, drink and be merry with the rude and the 
vulgar, should form a doubly good reason. 



Although it is early in the campaign — in fact, it will be six 
weeks before it really opens — the Democratic John-Donkey has al- 
ready commenced making mistakes. Amongst the names of those 
appointed as Vice-Presidents of Saturday evening's meeting that of I. 
S. Kalloch may be observed. The Democratic managers would do well to 
bear in mind that that disreputable person has long since lost any political 
influence he possessed, and that the public regards him with those feelings 
which a moral leper inspires; they would do well to take a mental run 
back over the incidents of last fall and then ask themselves if they are 
courting another defeat. A party which consorts with a political, Bocial 
blackguard cannot expect to inspire confidence. 


And now the cat is out of the bag. Every one used to wonder what 
the Irish patriot, Denis J. Toohy, was after. Every one knew that Irish 
patriots, in this land of the free and home of the brave, were always after 
some personal aggrandizement or political preferment, but Denis kept so 
quiet, and his movements were so mysterious, that it was somewhat diffi- 
cult to locate his objective point. Now we know it. As a proper reward 
for all these years of labor, as President of the Land League, he wants 
to be made a Superior Judge. He was once a Justice of the Peace in a 
mining camp, he holds a Supreme Court certificate, and he has labored in 
the cause of the Land L«ague. What greater qualifications could Su- 
perior Judge require? 

Ichl Ban enlarged ; largest in the world. 



July 15, 1882. 



CALIFORNIA ADVKKTISKK. 



8 



SOCIETY. 



July 13, 1882. What iileaMiit weather we have been having during 
the put week— almost the tir*t, I may say, of what has been an unusually 
cold Summer. But to me the Summer always seems over when the 4th 
»f July is past, ami so evidently think many who are returning to town 
from seaside and other Summer resort*. The Donahues have come hack 
from the Geysers ; the Donahoes from the Yosemite ; the Smedbergs are 
back from Santa Cruz, and the Fairs from Napa. Mrs. Withintrton has 
returned from San Mateo, and Lane Wilson and wife are reported as en 
route from New York, while, mi rontrairt, the Gwins and Eyres are just 
dapwting f°r Monterey, where, the riff- raff of the earlier weeks of the 
season having left for borne, there will, they think, be fewer disagreeables 
for them to be obliged to rub their patrician elbows against. 

By the by. a friend told me that at Monterey, the other night, it was 
amusing to see how Nob Hill was endeavoring to ostracize the Jewish ele- 
ment of the Del Monte visitors, hoping to render the house so disagreeable 
to them that they would give it a wide berth in future. I doubt their 
success in trying to make a Saratoga of the place. I hear that the most 
popular pastime at Monterey this season is the german, there being little 
else thought of there of an evening. Mr. Collins has proved a most 
etficiet leader ; and I am told that, his engagement with Miss McMullin 
having terminated by mutual consent, all the young women there assem- 
bled, both single and divorced, are throwing themselves at his head whole- 
sale. 

Mrs. and Miss Selby returned from Europe this morning, which is good 
news for all who know and like them, which is legion. 

The Fourth seems to have been very generally celebrated at all the resorts 
this year, but I should say, from all I hear, that at none of them was it 
more thoroughly enjoyecfthan at the Geysers, where, the Saturday pre- 
ceding, the Bohemians there abiding gave a sort of " High Jinks" party, 
which, judging by the well known wit and humor of many of the partici- 
pants, must indeed have been a delightful affair, the fair Sire coming in 
for no end of compliments for the dignified and charming manner in which 
she tilled the Chair. Mirth and jollity prevailed till a late hour, and all 
regretted when the meeting came to an end. 

Another of the pleasant parties of the Fourth was the one given by Mr. 
and Mrs. Towne, and called a " Forest " party, at a lovely place near 
Oakland, where a delightful day was spent and enjoyed by all who had 
the good luck to be included among the guests. 

Speaking of the Fourth, I hear that among the invited guests of the 
procession Dr. Beverley Cole made his first appearance in public since 
his return, his friends being delighted to hear that he has announced his 
intention to stay now that be has come back again. 

Great preparations are being made by our French residents for a grand 
celebration to-morrow nieht at Woodward's Gardens of their annual fete 
on the Fall of the Bastile, when, I venture to say, the display of fire- 
works will be something of which, unlike our Fourth of July fiasco, they 
will have no cause to be ashamed. But anything that Raphael Weil un- 
dertakes is sure to be done in a finished manner, and that this celebration 
will be a success is a foregone conclusion. 

Among the strangers within our gates is the young Scotch Lord, the 
Earl of Hopetown, who arrived a few days ago, but I have not heard 
that he has been bored here with unwished-for attentions, of which he 
complained so in the East. But then, perhaps, unlike his noble prede- 
cessor in these parts, he has not come heiress hunting. 

Sir William Eden, who is a prisoner on board the Belgic, and who was 
reported as willing to buy the whole fleet of the Occidental and Oriental 
Steamship Company's steamers rather than be kept in durance vile on a 
hulk, can almost lay claim to be considered an American, as he is noted 
in the Baronetage "as of Maryland." One of his ancestors settled in 
Maryland, and was killed before New Orleans in 1814. Some of our 
American belles should capture him, and make an American of him out 
and out. 

Of society events in the city there is nothing yet taking place worthy 
of record, and until more people get settled down at home again I do not 
think there will be. 

By the way, I did hope that the De Tocqueville party, having run and 
re-run the rounds of the papers, first as going to Yosemite, and then as 
returning from it, that we bad heard the last of them for the present at 
least; but I see they are cropping up again as being met by parties of 
tourists at various points along the road. Can't they be induced to give 
ub a rest for awhile ? Felix, 

AROUND SAN JOSE. 

July 10, 1882: — I promised in my last to tell you of some of the 
lovely places I visited around San Jose during my recent brief visit there; 
so take up the thread of the narrative where I was compelled, by want of 
space, to drop it — the drive to Alum Rock. Going out by Santa Clara 
street, on which the Auzerais House stands, the first object of interest is 
the State Normal School, a large building to the left of the road, and 
which is considered the finest of its kind in the State. Further on, and 
this time to the right of the road, is General Naglee's charming home. 
We could not resist the temptation to diverge from our path and drive 
round the grounds, which we did. The avenue leading up to the house 
passes rows upon rows of vines. The house itself is a modest Elizabethan 
cottage, covered with roses and honeysuckles, with a vine-clad porch. 
Beneath the overhanging branches stood the genial General himself, who 
hospitably invited us to enter and try a glass of his famous Naglee 
brandy, and, pointing to the distillery and works in the distance, offered 
to show us all over the works if we had time to see them. Unfortunately, 
time we had not; bo, postponing that pleasure for another visit, we con- 
tented ourselves with doing the grounds, and then sped onwardB to Alum 
Rock. Half way up the road, which winds around the foothills, we 
stopped for a view — and such a glorious one as it was ! A perfect 
panorama of delight. The town of San Jose, with the dome of its Court- 
house glittering in the sunlight, lay at our feet; the trees of the Alameda 
forming a thread of green stretching to Santa Clara; the purplish blue 
haze of the atmosphere, so peculiar to California, making everything ap- 
pear mellow, as it were, and the air so soft, like velvet, made us feel as 
though bathed in bliss, and thank God for the privilege of being alive. 

On arriving at Alum Rock we found a gay crowd of pleasure -seekers — 
some, like ourselves, having come for the beauty of the drive alone, others 
to drink the water at the spring, and one or two picnic parties were enjoy- 



ing the shade nf the trees below. Alum Rock is to San Jose what the 
Cliff House used to be to 'Frisco, only in place of the seals and surf sub- 
stitute rural felicity and mineral water. Several of the First Regiment 
had exchanged martial duty for service in the ranks of beauty, aug were 
to be seen strolling about with some very pretty girls. By the by, I 
never saw a place so full of pretty women as San Jose. I saw but one 
Qgfo one the whole time I was there, and she was & Mexican. 

On the drive back into town we branched off to the right and came in 
through the Hensley place, which used to bo the show place of the valley. 
But, alas! relentless time in its changes has not spared this old btand-by. 
and the little cottage where the Mayor's widow has made her home is all 
that remains of former greatness. The original house was burned down 
many years ago, and the grounds bear a semblance only to their pristine 
beauty. 

On the opposite side of the road, Ryland, the banker, lives; a two- 
Btoried bouse, with a pretty garden — nothing pretentious, but very home- 
like. The Murphys— that is, Barney, Jimmy and Dan— live in the 
town, the house of the latter being the finest of the three. The residences 
of most note in the town limits are those of Mrs. Davis, Senator Sharon's 
sister; Lion, the dry goods merchant; Rich, who owns the car line be- 
tween San Jose and Santa Clara; Mrs. Singletary, who has a beautiful 
place on the Alameda; Mr. Carter, the Leslies, Dr. Thorne, and many 
others "too numerous to mention." Little Delmas, who is one of the 
leading lawyers of San Jose (and, by the way, son-in-law of Joe Hoge, 
who holds a like position at the San Francisco bar), has a fine home in 
Santa Clara, which he has leased during his absence in Europe to Joe 
Eastland and family. Pierce's place is also at Santa Clara— the red brick 
house formerly the home of Bill Lent. It is principally noted for its 
fruit orchard, as beyond fruit the grounds amount to nothing. 

The most romantic drive is that to the Congress Springs, and one of the 
most enjoyable that to the Almaden Quicksilver Mine?, where a decade 
or more ago Sam Butterworth "ruled the roast." His nephew, Randol, 
now lives at the Hacienda, and is, I believe, manager of the mine. Crowds 
of touristB visit this place, and it is well worth a visit, although the trip 
up the mountain to the mine is a very tedious one, especially of a hot day, 
and, except in Winter, all the days are hot as hot can be. 

A friend who accompanied me out there told me that the merriest days 
of Almaden were those of the Pioche regime, when he leased the Hacienda 
from Butterworth as a Summer residence for himself, bringing thither at 
that Beason gay crowds from the city. Combining business with pleasure, 
he utilized the mineral spring that runs near the house, and calling it 
" Vichy Water" sold it in daintily put up cases, but the scheme did not 

pay. 

I found the great resort for the beauty and fashion of San Jose to be 
Waldteuffel's music store, where, dropping in for half an hour's lounge, 
one was sure to see all the belles in full force. To my taste, however, the 
nicest time of the day was the post-prandial hour, when, the inner man, 
refreshed with the good cheer of the Auzerais or La Molle, one enjoyed a 
good cigar in delicious ease on the balcony of either of the aforesaid 
houses, and watched the pretty girls as they drove by in endless stream 
and merriment. Every girl seems to own a vehicle of some sort, from a 
jaunty phaeton in all its styles and build, to a sober-sided buggy. With 
the head thrown back and the cool of the coming evening tempering the 
lingering sunlight, makes it a delightful time for a ride. So evidently 
think the inhabitants, and bo unquestionably does "Occasional." 

THE RESULTS OF AN ACCIDENT. 
To meet with an accident is in itself bad enough. To have it in- 
terfere for several months with one's occupation and amusement is worse 
still. But when one has succeded in recovering from the mishap, to have 
it^ said that the injured limb has been amputated, and to be condoled 
with not only privately, but in the public press, is indeed going from bad 
to worse. Such, however, have been the experiences of a young English 
lady, named Miss Fannie Joseph. She certainly met with an accident 
on the Btage, which injured one of her legs, but she has now happily re- 
covered. Some ill-natured friends, however, have recently circulated a 
report that she has had to have her leg amputated, and before she had 
even seen the statement she was inundated with — not letters of condo- 
lence — but letters from manufactures of artificial limbs, begging that they 
might have the "pleasure" of supplying her with a false leg. One 
" Professor " says that until he knows for what purposes the leg is to be 
used he cannot estimate, but he will be glad of an interview ; another 
tells her that legs have been the study of his life, and that he is certain 
he could please her ; and another comforts her with the assurance that 
the legs he makes are better than those supplied by nature. Now, 
all this may be highly interesting from a scientific point of view, but as 
Miss Josephs has fully recovered from her accident, which never sug- 
gested even the thought of amputation, it is rather hard to be favored 
with all these details. 

If you want to learn how to dance, read J. William Frazer's adver- 
tisement in this paper to-day. The terms are very low — no one. can grum- 
ble at such rates, if your means are limited. 



THE GREAT I 



MAMMOTH DISPLAY OF 

Sa?H.-A.-V^- HATS! 



THREE HUNDRED CASES OF 

Men's and Boys' Straw Hats 

TO SELECT FROM. 

Amongst this Spring's Importations are some of the Nobbiest Styles 
of STRAW HATS FOR YOUNG MEN that have ever been offered 
in San Francisco. Strictly One Price. 

FLAVIN'S 
GREAT 

Corner of Kearny and Commercial Streets, S. 



I IXI Hi 



4 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER AND 



July 15, 1882. 



WHLTT1ER ON 

With a glory of winter Bunshine 
O er his locks of gray, 
In the old historic mansion, 
He sat on his last birthday 
Withhisbooks — his pleasant pictures 
And his household and his kin, 
While a sound as of myriads singing 
From far and near stole in. 
It came from his own fair city, 
From the prairies' boundless plain, 
From the Golden Gate of sunset, 
And the cedar woods of Maine. 
And his heart grew warm within him 
And his moistening eyes grew dim, 
He knew that his country's children 
Were singing the songs of him ; 
The lays of his life's glad morning, 
The psalms of hiB evening time, 
Whose echoes shall float forever 
On the winds of every clime. 



LONGFELLOW. 

All their beautiful consolations, 
Sent forth like birds of cheer. 
Game flocking back to his windows, 
And sang in the poet's ear. 
Grateful, but solemn and tender. 
The music rose and fell, 
With a joy akin to Badness 
And a greeting-like farewell. 
With a sense of awe he listened 
To the voices sweet and young ; 
The last of earth — the first of heaven 
Seemed in the songs they sung ; 
,And waiting a little longer 
For the wonderful change to come, 
He heard the summoning angel 
Who calls God's children home. 
And to him a holier welcome 
Was the mistic meaning given 
Of the words of the blessed Master: 
"Of Buch is the kingdom of heaven." 
— J. G. Whittier in Wide Awake. 



AN ELEPHANT'S PORTRAIT. 

Dining out, recently, at a bachelor's party given by Colonel , 

I was asked by my host if I would make a sketch of an elephant's head 
for him. Of course there was but one answer, "Yes," though I added, 
feeling uncertain as to the result, " It may be a failure — but I will do my 
best." So on the first morning that I had time to spare, I set off to the 
great temple, with the intention of sketching one of the elephants. You 
know that at all important temples there are elephants ; they are much 
prized as possessions, and take part in most of the religious ceremonies 
and processions. Some of them are employed to carry the water and flow- 
ers which are brought in daily for the gods and godesses, for which purpose 
they start off early in the morning accompanied by a few of the temple 
dignitaries, and to music too, if a fearful noise like some half-dozen tin- 
kettles beaten out of time can be so called. Ou arriving at the temple I 
looked to see which would make the best sketch, and decided that the lar- 
gest, a huge brute (whose tusks had been sawn off because he had once 
killed a keeper), chained up in a separate court of the temple, would de- 
cidely be the one. Seating myself on a stone which was lying in the 
shade of the outer wall of the temple, and being further protected from 
the sun by a cocoa-nut tree and an umbrella, the last held by one of my 
servants, and, further, being armed with paper and pencil, I set to work 
to make my sketch. It always takes me some time to decide upon which 
view to take, and when that is settled which part of the view shall be com- 
menced first. In this instance I was prepared to begin with a side view 
of the great brute chained np before me ; but in this I reckond without 
my host, for, objecting to being looked at, he turned himself round so as 
to bring one of his little twinkling eyes to bear upon me. I commenced 
my sketch, taking a good look first, and then trying to produce the result 
on paper. As I progressed I observed that the eye next me twinkled 
more and more, and that the elephant was slowly swaying his trunk from 
side to side. I tried to make the best of it, and went on with my sketch. 
When looking up to take fresh observations, I was just in time to stoop 
down and so avoid a brick which flew over my head and was smashed a- 
gainst the wall at the back. The whole thing was so ludicrous that I 
and my servants laughed heartily. The determined opposition to my 
presence you can understand, but I cannot describe the merry twinkle in 
the eye, nor the wonderful accuracy of the aims. From that moment, 
sticks, stoneB, and pieces of brick were thrown at me, and would have in- 
evitably made acquaintance with my head had not my servants caught 
them as they arrived. I could not, however, get on with the sketch. So 
as the elephant yawned, I did the same ; and then I left, much amused 
by the morning's entertainment. The colonel was disappointed at not 
having the promised drawing ; but then, as I told him, " You see the el. 
ephant did not understand the matter, and decidedly objected to my pre- 
sence." — Leisure Sour. 

COAL DEPOSIT OF PUGET SOUND. 

The great coal-fields of King Gounty are practically inexhaustible. 
For generations yet to come the coal mines in the Puget Sound basin will 
continue to be a source of revenue. The mining of coal is yet in its in- 
fancy compared to the mining operations that will be carried on here 
within a few years more. The time is not far distant when there will be as 
many men employed in coal mining in Washington Territory as there are 
now at work in the mines of Pennsylvania* While King County has sev- 
eral mines that are rapidly being developed, yet the coal deposits of Pu- 
get Sound are not confined alone to this county. The Northwest Enterprise 
callB attention to the fact that there is plenty of coal on the Snohomish, 
Stilaguamish, Samish and upper Nootsack Rivers, in many places posi- 
tively known to exist, and in others only hinted at and designedly kept 
quiet. In only a few instances has the quantity orvalue been investigated 
by making an opening. Northwest of the Sumas road, running from Bel- 
lingham Bay to Sumas Lake in British Columbia, there are no indications 
of it on the'surface, while east of that line coal has been found in many 
places. 

The Nootsack plain is composed of drift and sediment, supposed to 
have come from Fraser River ; yet lying deeper there may be coal, in the 
Nootsack as well as in the Stilaguamish and Skagit River valleys, as it is 
known to extend under Bellingham Bay, where it has been mined. The 
valley containing this coal extends across the Sound, and shows coal again 
in the Olympic Mountains and Vancouver Islands sides. Coal has been 
reparted at Langley, Burrard Inlet, Pit River and other places in the 
plains on the Fraser, underneath a sediment like that of Bellingham Bay. 
Chunks of coal are also found in the drift ot Guemas, Samish and Fi- 
dalgo Islands, adjacent to older rocks, the situation of which clearly im- 
plies that it is in place somewhere not very far away. The truth is that 
we are in a coal country from Waldron Island to Sauk River, but neither 
the rocks containing it, commonly known as the coal measures, nor the 
country itself, nor even the scores of croppings actually discovered and 
more or less known, have received the attention they should. — Seattle 
Chronicle. 



BANKS. 



THE BANK OF CALIFORNIA, SAN FRANCISCO. 

Capital.. $3,000,000. 

WM.ALVORD President. 

THOMAS BROWN, Cashier | B MURRAY, Jr., ASS't Cashier 

Aoknts : 

New York, Agency of the Bank of Calfornia ; Boston, Tremont National Bank , 
Chicago, Union National Bank ; St. Louis, Boatman's Saving Bank ; New Zealand, 
the Bank of New Zealand. Correspondent in London, Messrs. N. M. Rothschild & 
Sons. Correspondents in India, China, Japan and Australia, the Oriental Bank Cor- 
poration. 

The Bank has Agencies at Virginia City, and Correspondents in all the princi- 
pal Mining Districts and Interior Towns of the Pacific Coast. 

Letters of Credit issued, available in all parts of the world. Draw direct on Lon- 
don, Duhlin, Paris, Berlin, Bremen, Hamburg, Frankfort-on-the-Main, Antwerp, 
Amsterdam, St. Petersburgh, Copenhagen, Stockholm, Christiana, Locarno, Mel- 
bourne, Sydney, Auckland, Hong kong, Shanghai, Yokohama. Nov. 4. 

BANK OF BRITISH COLUMBIA. 

Incorporated by Royal Charter.— Capital paid up, 81,800,- 
000, with power to increase to $10,000,000. Southeast corner California and San- 
somestreets. Head Office— 28 Cornhill, London. Branches— Portland, Oregon; Vic- 
toria, New Westminster and Cariboo, British Columbia. 

This Bank transacts a General Banking Business. Accounts opened subject to Check 
and Special Deposits received. Commercial Credits granted available in al parts of 
the world. Approved Bills discounted and advances made on good collateral security. 
Draws direct at current rates upon its Head Office and Branches, and upon its Agents 
as follows : 

New York, Chicago and Canada— Bank of Montreal ; Liverpool—North and South 
Wales Bank; Scotland— British Linen Company; Ireland— Bank of Ireland ; Mex- 
ico and South America — London Bank of Mexico and South America ; China and 
Japan— Chartered Bank of India, Australia and China, and Oriental Bank ; Australia 
and New Zealand— Bank of Australasia, Commercial Banking Company of Sydney, 
English, Scottish and Australian Chartered Bank, and Colonial Bank, Panama. 

May 18. FREDERICK TOWNSEND, Manager. 

FIRST NATIONAL GOLD BANK OF SAN FRANCISCO, CAL. 

Paid np Capital 91,300,000, Gold. President, R. C. Wool- 
worth Vice-President, D. Callaghan ; Cashier, E. D. Morgan. 

Directors :— R. C. Woolworth, D. Callaghan, C. G. Hooker, George A. Low, Peter 
Donahuey4saac Wormser, James Phelan, James Moffitt, N. Van Bergen. 

CoRRKSPONDKNTs — London : Baring Bros. & Co. Bank of Montreal, No. 9 Birchin 
Lane, Lombard street. Dublin : Provincial Bank of Ireland- Hamburg : Hesse, 
Neuman&Co. Paris: Hottingueri Co. New York: National Bank of Commerce. Bos- 
ton : Blackstone National Bank. Chicago : First National Bank. This Bank is pre- 
pared to transact a general Banking business. Deposits in Gold, Silver and Currency 
received subject to check or on special deposit. Exchange for sale on the principal 
cities of the United States, Great Britain, Ireland and the Continent. Commercia 
Credits issued available in Europe, Chii.a and Japan. Collections attended to and 
prompt returns made at the lowest market rates of Exchange. Jan. 19. 

LONDON AND SAN FRANCISCO BANK, LIMITED. 

Capital, $2,100,000. 

San Francisco Office, 434 California street; London Office, 
22 Old Broad street. Portland Branch, Ainsworth's Building. Manager, 
ARTHUR SCRIVENER; Assistant Manager, WILLIAM STEEL. London Bankers, 
Bank of England and London Joint Stock Bank; New York, Drexel, Morgan 6z 
Co. ; Boston. Third National Bank. This Bank is prepared to transact all kiuds 
of General Banking and Exchange Business in London and San Francisco, and 
between said cities and all parts of the world. Oct. 9. 

THE NEVADA BANK OF SAN FRANCISCO. 

Capital Paid Up $3,000,000. 

Reserve, TJ. S. Bonds 4,000,000. 

Agency at New York, 62 Wall street. 
Agency at Virginia 3 Nev. 

Buys and sella Exchange and Telegraphic Transfers. Issues Commercial and Trav- 
elers' Credits. This Bank has special facilities for dealing in bullion. Nov. 8. 

THE ANGLO-CALIFORNIAN BANK, LIMITED. 

422 California St., San Francisco. 

London Office, 3 Angel Court ; New York Agents, J. W . Sel- 
igman & Co., 21 Broad street. Authorized Capital Stock, SU.000,000. Will re- 
ceive Deposits, open Accounts, make Collections, buy and sell Exchange and Bullion, 
loan Money, and issue Letters of Credit available throughout the world. 

FRED. F. LOW, IGN. STEINHART, Managers. 
P. N. Lilibnthal, Cashier. Sept. 13. 

SECURITY SAVINGS BANK. 

GUARANTEE CAPITAL, 8300,000. 

Officers: Vice- President, Jerome Lincoln; Secretary, W. 
S. Jones ; Attorney, Sidney V. Smith. Loans made on Real Estate and other 
Approved Securities. Office : No. 215 Sansome street, San Francisco. Oct. 14. 

THE GERMAN SAVINGS AND LOAN SOCIETY. 

Deutsche Sparand Leihbank, No 526 California street, San 
Francisco. Officers : President, L. GOTTIG. Board of Dirkctors.— Fred. 
Roedintr, Chas. Kohler, Edw. Kruse, George H. Eggers, N. Van Bergen, H. L. Simon, 
Peter Spreckels, Ign. Steinhart. Secretary, GEO. LETTE ; Attorney, JOHN R. 
JARBOE. May 18. 

SELBY SMELTING AND LEAD COMPANY, 

416 Montgomery Street San Francisco. 

Gold and Silver Refinery and Assay Office. 

Highest Prices Paid for Gold, Silver and Lead Ores and Sulphurets. Manufac- 
turers of BLUESTONE. Also, Lead Pipe, Sheet Lead, Shot, etc. This Company 
has the best facilities on the Coast for working GOLD, SILVER and LEAD in their 
various forms. 

June 18. PRENTISS SELBY, Superintendent. 



TO LEASE, 



For a long- term—Lot on north side of Towusend street, 
between Fourth and Fifth, l&i 4-12 feet easterly from Fifth. Size 91 8-12 feet 
by 120 feet. Apply to JOHN ROACH, 

April 1. 219 Montgomery street. 



$66" 



week in your own town. Terms and $5 outfit free. 

Address H. Haixett dfc Co., Portland, Maine. 



July 15, 1882. 



CALIFORNIA ADVERTISER. 



DE LAM' A STRAYIN. 
[The following ubartetfan vm rfna at a colored camp meeting The 
dUlect \n that of a MutH.88.pt>i plantation:] 

Look out, backfiller, whar you walking 

Make a misstep. Am you bo'n, 
I tell you what it's no use talkin', 

Ef too slip op, chile, you gone. 
De road is full er stumps and stubble, 

KuU* an* sink holen eberywhar'. 
I spec' dey'll gib you heap er trouble, 

If you don't stop yo 1 foolin' dar. 
It's dark ez pitch an* mighty cloudy. 

Spec' de debbil'a walkm roun', 
Fus* thing you know he'll tell you "howdy" — 

Lif his hoof an' stomp de groun*. 
Man, can't you see a sto'm a brewin* ! 

Hear de awful thunder peal ! 
Look ! Blazen' light'nin' threat'nin' ruin — 

0, backslider, how you feel? 
Drap on yo' knees an' go to prayin', 

Ai the Lawd to help you out. 
Chile, tell him you's a lam* a strayin' — 

Done got loe' an* stumlin' 'bout. 
An' den you'll Bee de stars a gleamin' — 

'Luminatin' all de way. 
Yes, 'bout ten thousan' twinklin' beanrin' — 

Smack untwell de break er day, 
But ef you fail, debbil get you. 

Fetch you slap ! right in yo' eye. 
You'll feel mos' like er grape shot hit you, 

Drapp'd from haf way to de sky! 

—Robert McOee. 

ELECTRICITY, ETC. 

Gas is far preferable to coal for iron puddling. Dr. Siemens has done 
a great deal in the production of steel by his gas furnaces, which can pro- 
duce as much as 5 tons at a charge. The electric light may not only ex- 
tinguish the gas lamps, but electricity, it is evident, will be in increasing 
request for many other purposes connected with our leading industries, 
especially in the making of iron and steel. The ultimate result of the 
substitution of gas for coal will be the saving of millions of tons of coal 
per annum. But electricity still will be the enemy of gas in metallurgical 
operations owing to its intense heat. Electricity can fuse metal with the 
greatest ease and rapidity. In experiments made by Dr. Siemens a cru- 
cible was charged with a pound weignt nf old iron broken up, and the 
dynamo electric current being sent through it, the mass was completely 
melted in about twelve minutes, being poured out in a highly fluid state, 
whilst a second charge was reduced in about eight minutes. According 
to this eminent electrician, 1 lb of coal will melt a similar weight of mild 
steel, the coal being burnt in the engine driving the dynamo-electric ma- 
chine. By the ordinary system carried out in Sheffield and elsewhere, a 
ton of steel in crncibles requires to melt it from 2i to 3 tons of coke, the 
same work being done with 1 ton of coal when the crucibles are heated 
in the regenerative gas furnace ; but in the furnace to which the dynamo- 
electric current is applied, a ton of steel can be made with 12 cwt. of coal. 
The temperature obtained by electricity is something enormous ; one 
scientist has estimated it at 3,500 deg. Centigrade, whilst Dr. Siemens 
considers it practically unlimited. 

Mr. Willougbby Smith has been experimenting in a direction full 
of promise of valuable results. Using a tuning-fork as a make and break 
in circuit with a large Oat disc of insulated wire, he finds that a telephone 
(or a Bell telephone without the coil, or a magnet, or a piece of iron) al- 
together unconnected with the circuit will reproduce the musical sound 
of the tuning-fork. By means of a diaphragm, he has investigated the 
lines of force from the coil, and has obtained some interesting results. 
The sounds are reproduced if the receiving diaphragm is in another room, 
or if there are two rooms with their walls and air between. In fact, the 
lines of force seem to extend a long way. If the diaphragm is placed 
parallel to the lines of force, no result is obtained ; but of course this 
may be obviated by using a hollow cylindrical or polyhedral diaphragm 
with a suitable magnet. 

The announcement that thi3 light is no longer being used in the 
Avenue de 1' Opera has received the explanation that it is merely a tem- 
porary suspensiou, the contract having been renewed for three years. 
The previous lighting has been somewhat costly to the Campagnie 
Ge'ne'rale de I' Electricite owing to exceptional circumstances, tinder 
the new arrangments the Company will be able to carry their main wires 
through the Bewers, and the whole of the lights from the Opera House to 
the Theatre Francais will be supplied from one central station. This 
centralization, coupled with the fact that the new contract will give the 
Company power to introduce the light into the houses of the district served 
by their mains will, it is believed, change the former loss into a future 
good profit. 

If two metallic surfaces be placed for a few moments opposite each 
other, at a short distance (a small fraction of an inch) it is found that 
each metal has undergone a slight superficial alteration. The change 
increases with time, then tends to a limit. When the influencing metal 
is withdrawn, the metal affected reverts gradually to its previous state. 
These observations have been made by M. Pellat, who detected and esti- 
mated the alteration by measuring the difference of potential. He shows 
reason for believing that the action is not electrical, but purely material. 
It depends essentially on the nature of the influencing metal, being great 
with lead, less with copper, and nil with zinc. 

When Faure's discovery of the storage of electricity was made known, 
many novel uses were claimed for the new discovery, but no one ventured 
to think it would be likely to increase our fiBh supply. Yet this it may 
do. The French Government have just sanctioned the experiment of fish- 
ing by electricity. It is well known that light at night exercises an irre- 
sistible influence over fish. 

The new food, which has cured the chronic dyspeptics of Japan, is 
Midzu Ami (Japanese Malt), at Ichi Ban. 



ENTERPRISE MILL AND BUILDING CO., 

Sawlnar, Planing- and Manufacturing— Boors, Sashes, Blinds and 

Mouldings— Turning', Scroll and Jig Sawing— Counters. 

Bar and Store Fixtures. 

Finishing Work (or Building* on Hand and Made to Order. 

a IT to 325 Spear S< ., ami 218 to 226 Stewart St., ft. F. 

The largest and oldest eetablUhed mill on the Pacific Coast. 
D. A. Macdosali), Pres't. R. S. Falconkr, Soc"y. W. N. Miller, Supt 
^__ [March 25.) 

ASSESSMENT NOTICE. 

Amies Silver Mining; Company. ••• Location of principal 
place "f business. Ban Franalsoo, California. Location of works, Virginia 

attnlng District, Storey County, Nevada.— Notice is hereby given that at ;i moating 
of the Board of Directors, held on the fourteenth day of June, 1882, an assess- 
ment {No. 19) of Twenty-ova (26) Cents per share was levied upon tbe capital stock 
of the Corporation, payable Immediately, In United states gold coin, to the Secretary, 
at the office of the Company, Room 2, Nevada Block, No. 309 Montgomery street, 
San Francisco, California. 

Any stock upon which this assessment shall remain unpaid on the TWENTY- 
FIRST (21st) day of July, 1882, will be delinquent and advertised for sale at public 
auction ; and unless payment is made before, will be sold on THURSDAY, the 
TENTH (10th) day of August, 1882, to pay the delinquent assessment, together with 
costs of advertising and expenses of sale. By order of the Board of Directors, 

BUTLER BURRIS, Secretary. 

Office— Room 2, Nevada Block, No. 309 Montgomery street, San Francisco, Cal. 
(June 17.) 

ASSESSMENT NOTICE. 

New York Mining- Company.-- Locution of principal place 
of business, San Francisco, California; location of works, Gold Hill, Storey 
County, Nevada. Notice is hereby given that at a meeting of the Board of Direct- 
ors, held on the twenty-eighth duy of June, 1882, an assessment (No. 28) of Ten 
Cents per share was levied upon the capital stock of the corporation, payable imme- 
diately, in United States gold coin, to the Secretary, at the office of the Company, 
Room 8, No. 327 Pine street (San Francisco Stock Exchange Building), San Fran- 
cisco, California. 

Any stock upon which this assessment shall remain unpaid on the thirty-first day of 
July, 1882, will be delinquent, and advertised for sale at public auction; and un- 
less payment is made betore, will be sold on MONDAY, the twenty-first day of August, 
1882, to pay the delinquent assessment, together with costs of advertising and ex- 
penses of sale. By order of the Board of Directors. 

F. E. DIETZ, Secretary. 

Office—Room 8, No. 327 Pine street (Stock Exchange Building), San Francisco, 
California. July 8. 

ASSESSMENT NOTICE. 

CALIFORNIA MINING COMPANY. 

Assessment No. 4 

Amount per Share 10 Cents 

Levied June 10th 

Delinquent in Office July 18th 

Day of Sale of Delinquent Stock August 16th 

C. P. GORDON, Secretary. 
Office— Room 23, Nevada Block, No. 309 Montgomery street, San Francisco, Cal- 
ifornia. June 24. 

DIVIDEND NOTICE. 

Tbe German Savings and Loan Society. For the half-year 
ending this date, the Board of Directors of THE GERMAN SAVINGS AND 
LOAN SOCIETY has declared a DiviJend on Term Deposits at the rate of Four and 
Thirty-two One Hundredths (4 32-100) per cent, per annum, and on Ordinary De- 
posits at the rate of Three and Six Tenths (3 6-10) per cent, per annum, free from 
Federal Taxes, and payable on and after the 10th day of July, 1882. By order. 
San FranciBCQ, June 30, 1882- (July 1.) GEO. LETTE, Secretary. 

DIVIDEND NOTICE. 

The California Savings and Loan Society, northwest cor- 
ner Powell and Eddy streets. The Board of Directors have declared a divi- 
dend to Depositors at the rate of four and thirty-two one-hundred the (4 32-100) per 
cent, per annum on Term Deposits, and three and sixty one-hundredths (3 60-i00) 
per cent per annum on Ordinary Deposits, free from Federal Tax, for the naif-year 
ending June 30, laS2, payable on and after July 10, 1882. 
July s. VERNON CAMPBELL, Secretary. 

DIVIDEND NOTICE. 

Office or the Silver Kins Mining; Company, San Francisco, 
July 4, 1882.— At a meeting of the Board of Direetors of the above 
named Company, held this day, a Dividend (No. 31) of Twenty-live Cents (25c.) per 
share was declared, payable on SATURDAY, July 15, 1882, at the office of the 
Company, Room 19, 328 Montgomery street, San Francisco, Cal. Transfer Books 
will close July 10, 1SS2, at 12 h. 
July 8. JOSEPH NASH, Secr etary . 

STOCKHOLDERS' MEETING. 

Office of the Spring Valley Water Worka, 516 California 
street, San Francisco, July Gth, 1882.— The annual meeting of the stockhold- 
ers of the Spring Valley Water Works will be held at the office of the Company, 516 
California street, on WEDNESDAY, July 19th, 1882, at 12 o'clock M., for the election 
of Tr ustees for the ensuing year. !July8.1 WM. NORR1S, Secretary. 

BRITISH BENEVOLENT SOCIETY OF CAL. 

Attendance, dally, from 10 a.m. to 1 p.m., by the under- 
signed, to receive subscriptions and donations, ana to furnish all information 
relating to the Society. J. P- McCURME, Secretary, 

Oct. 23. Room 4, No. 531 California St. 

PROF. JOS. J0SSET7 

Graduate of the University of Paris; Ex. Professor of De 
la Mennais' Normal, France; late of Point Loma Seminary, San Diego. Pri- 
vate Lessons in the French Language. Residence: 1114 Stockton street, between 
Pacific and Jackson. At home from 12 to 2 p.m. Private Lessons given at the res- 
idence of the pupil. Dec. 6. 

WM. H. V. CR0NISE, 

Mining, IT.E. corner of Montgomery and Californiastreets, 
No. 29. Office Hours: 11 a.m. to 2 p.m. June 10. 

REMOVAL. 

L Wad bam has removed to Room 3, No. 538 California St., 
* Bank Commissioners' Office. June 10. 

A /"IT? AT HP O Can now grasp a fortune. Outfit worth $10 free. 
A (JT-CJ JN 1 fe RIDEOTJT & CO.. 10 Barclay Street, New York 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER AND 



July 15, 1882. 



"PLEASURE'S WAND." 

"We Obey no Wand bnt Pleasure '»■"— Tom Moore. 

"American Born" is a play that wil\ not stand the slightest analysis. 
It is exaggerated, extravagant, unnatural and improbable in plot; vulgar, 
common-place, cheap, trashy and inartistic in development of action and 
speech. The actors and actresses act and speak as if ashamed of them- 
selves; ashamed of being part and parcel of such a glaring example of the 
present degraded condition of true dramatic art. I was going to com- 
mence by saying that, if any one thought a dramatic critic's task was an 
easy one, be should sit through this play and then attempt to criticise it. 
You may say that it was easy enough to write the above lines of con- 
demnation, if one thought so. Per se, it was. But, having done so, I find 
myself all by myself in my opinions. My confreres write in praise, and 
an admiring and applauding public tills the theatre, and so it would seem 
asif I were wrong. For the life of me, I can't see what there is topraiBe or 
applaud in American Born. I cannot imagine what possible pleasure and 
amusement intelligent, well-educated and refined people can derive from 
seeing a play that in action and language is an insult to their intelligence, 
and a shock to their refinement. And that is what all these melodramas 
of the Merritt, Pettit and Sims school are. I can understand their popu- 
larity in England. There they are played at so-called popular theatres ; 
theatres that draw their audiences from the middle and lower classes. 
Subtleties of plot, intricacies of intrigue and delicacies of dialogue would 
be thrown away upon such amusement-seekers. Their own lives are full 
of vulgarity and coarseness; tbeir heads and hearts lack sensitiveness, and 
they can only be emotioned by rough and violent methods ; their lan- 
guage is limited in words and expression, and grandiloquent forms of 
Bpeech and the use of high-sounding words are to them matters of ad- 
miration and awe. That melodramas of the kind mentioned, set in the 
modern perfection of scenic art, should hold and interest these audiences, 
is almost self-evident. But in this country things are different. These 
plays are produced at our best theatres; witness The World and Youth at 
Wallack's and The Lights o' London at the Union Square. And our beau 
monde is expected to be attracted and amused by such rot, and horrtsco 
referens, it is ! You may tell me that the beautiful and realistic scenery 
is the magnet in these plays, but I cannot believe that that 
is a sufficiently powerful attraction. I should think few would 
care to sit through three hours of idiotic twaddle, neither emo- 
tional nor hum< »rous ; disconnected episodes, so stupidly brutal 
that they nullify all workings of the imagination, for the sake 
of seeing two or three pretty and effective stage pictures. And 
what is more, those scenes are more puffed up than their beauty or novelty 
deserve. Take the so-called "magnificent volcano effect" in American 
Born. It is produced by methods that date back to the infancy of stage 
machinery, by artitices crude and simple in the extreme. Reverse the 
machinery, use a pot of white lead and one of blue paint, and you have 
the common stage waterfall! I thougbt it was a very commonplace dis- 
play. I remember as a youth witnessing a performance of Petrella's 
opera of lone, at the New York Academy of Music. This was over 
twenty years ago, and Italian opera is even now noted for its lack of 
accompanying scenic effects. In the last act of lone there occurs the 
eruption of Vesuvius and the destruction of Pompeii. It was an ad- 
mirably arranged affair, and something alongside of which Belasco's erup- 
tion fades into insignificance. And it was not advertised in capitals on the 
posters, either. I simply cannot explain to my own satisfaction this degraded 
taste of our theatre-goers; I give it up! The end of this melodramatic 
excitement is, unfortunately, not yet at hand. Next season there will 
be five or six of these things on the boards. Romany Bye, the newest of 
them, is, I am told, the worst of the lot, and it may prove to be the straw, 
etc. I hope so! The company that has been playing American Born is a 
capital one. That their efforts should be so successful, considering the 
terrible handicap the play puts upon them, is all the more to their credit. 
Ada Ward is essentially a society actress, and is out of place in an exag- 
gerated character full of cheap heroics. But she managed by the charm 
of her manner and by her thorough womanliness to elevate the character 
and make it sympathetic. Ada Gilman is a delicious little soubrette, full 
of vivacity. The comedy scenes of the play, as acted by her and John 
Dillon, were its redeeming features. I can well understand that Dillon 
is a great favorite in his part of the country. He is a most accomplished 
comedian, with a remarkable neat way of making his points. There is a 
finish to his impersonation that is most satisfactory. Grismer and Brad- 
ley succeeded in making their rather unthankful parts acceptable, and 
Osborne gave a tone and dignity to a decidedly ridiculous character. 
Jennings, for the first time since he gave us his quaint impersonation of 
"Joskins Tubbs," attempted a finished piece of acting. He was fairly 
successful, nothing more. His hesitancy in.the delivery of his lines, due 
to indifferent study, will always mar any of his efforts. Kennedy, I 

think, was very bad. 

* * * * * 

The Hanlons open on Monday! This will be a treat, indeed. I tell 

you all, this is a show that is worth seeing, not once, but several times. 

* * # * # 

Pinafore was to be produced last evening at the Standard. My Brudder- 
in-Laio has been playing to small audiences. 

******* 

The minstrels are doing their usual big business. This is the third or 
fourth trip of this troupe to San Francisco, and they always create quite 
an excitement. Some time ago I expressed my opinion on minstrelsy, 
and have nothing new to add. Whatever merit there is in this class of 
performances, this troupe possesses to a high degree. The end men are ex- 
cessively clever— clever enough to neatly but forcibly force down the usual 
and habitual jokes. Jokes that were jokes long before negro minstrelsy was 
thought of, and that will be jokes until the institution will, thank God, 
have disappeared. There are six end men, Cushman, Spencer, Dockstader, 
Sadler, Pice and Thatcher. Their respective styles are very dissimilar, 
and therefore all the more amusing. The vocalists have tuneful voices, 
and the choruses are well rendered, with the usual pianissimo effects. 
Leon is as clever and graceful as ever, and his act one of the best things 
on the bill. The military clog is a pretty conceit, and, with its bright 
costumes, striking tableaux and remarkable precision of movement, forms 
quite an agreeable spectacle. The Picnic is one of those roaring absurd- 
ities that serve to send every one home in a delightful humor. 



jEolia is drawing well. It is a very pleasant entertainment, and Lyn- 
ton, Bornemann, and particularly Stuart Harold, are great favorites with 

the audiences. 

***** 

The Tivoli has, so to speak, spread itself on Der Freischutz. The or- 
chestra has been augmented, the choruB nearly doubled, and the scenic 
effects very carefully attended to. The incantation scene is admirably 
managed, and the necessary weird, fantastical, diabolical, etc., im- 
pression, is very effectively produced. The Bputtering of firework fuses, 
the fire, the powder and smoke, the red lights, and many other kindred 
devices, are enough to give a weak-nerved person fits. The chorus do 
their work very well, the principals but indifferently. The music is very 
difficult, and should be left to the most finished of finished operatic 
artists. The place is nightly jammed, and the Krelings are becoming 
millionaires. 

» * * * * * 

Charles Norris is an actor who has been prominently before the public 
of this city for some two years. Most people consider him of bnt very 
moderate ability, and I have in these columns repeatedly criticised his 
work very Beverely, but always within the bounds of what is legitimate 
criticism. But the man has never done anything to warrant the attack 
made upon him last Sunday night, at the California Theatre, by the 
hoodlums in the gallery. It wae a benefit performance, and Mr. Norris 
had kindly and generously volunteered, and that in itself ought to have 
guaranteed him a kind reception. I am very glad there was a sufficient 
number of respectable people in the theatre to drown the gallery tumult 
in applause. 

****** 

Roland Reed, in Clieek, is a success. ^— Patti, Nilsson, Salvini, Wynd- 
ham, Modjeska, Aim6e, and, possibly, Ristori, form a goodly array of 
foreign names for America the coming season, without mentioning Lang- 
try.— The receipts of the Madison Square management for the past 
season for its home and traveling companies amounted to more than 
$800,000. Not one of its traveling companies had a losing week during 
the entire season. —-Lawrence Barrett has had bis father placed in a 
private asylum, not because he was crazy or dangerous, but because his 
extreme old age has so weakened his mind that unless the best of care is 
taken of him he may do himself an injury.-^— Dora Wiley, the prima of 
the Norcross Opera Comique Company, now doing The Merry War in New 
York, is said to be physically the broadest woman ever seen there in 
tights.^— Benj. Owen, who was here for awhile some time ago, is now 
organist of Trinity Church, Chicago. -^Buffalo Bill has been surprising 
his old acquaintances everywhere by refusing to drink anything stronger 
than cider.-^—Jacques Kruger is going to star. ^—Nelson Decker is bet- 
ter.— -Ethel Arden has appeared in England in La Belle Russe. A suc- 
cess!^— Lotta is going to play in England. ^— Digby Bell is engaged by 
McCaull for next season, Charley Dungan taking his place with Daly. 
—Mario is 74, Sims Reeves 61, and Brignoli— don't know. Mario is 
nearly dead with acute bronchitis. ^—Ristori is going to play in English 
in London.^— Planquette is writing a new opera boutfe. —Stephen 
Massett is in New York.^— The Union Square Theatre Company is the 
next attraction at the California. 

***** 

Au revoir! Here's hoping to see you all on Monday evening at the 



Hanlons. 



Beauclerc. 



If you want to learn how to dance, read J. William F razor's adver- 
tisement in this paper to-day. The terms are very low — no one can grum- 
ble at such rates, if your means are limited. 

BALDWIN'S THEATRE. 

MONDAY JU1/T 17th 

THE H A.3V JOOISTS, 

In Their Laughable Parisian Absurdity, 

Le Voyage En Suisse. 

Six Evening's said Saturday Matinee. 

No Sunday Night Performance or Wednesday Matinee. 

[July 15.] 

TIVOLI GARDEN, 

Eddy street, near Market.-- Kreliug- Bros., Proprietors. 
W. C. Lloyd, Stage Manager. To-night and until further notice, C. M. von 
Weber's Grand Romantic Opera, in 4 Acts, 

Der Freischutz I 

or, THE SEVEN CHARMED BULLETS. With the following artists in the cast: 
M1S8 LOUISE LESTER and MISS LOUISE LEIGHTON alternating as "Agathe;" 
MR. T. W. ECKERT and MR. F. URBAN alternating as " Max." Miss Carrie God- 
frey, as "Ann;" Mr. M. Cornell, as "Caspar." E. N. Knight, H. Niemann, Chas. 
Evans, Mr. Vidal. Largely Increaaed Orchestra and Chorus. Conductor, Mr. Geo. 
Loesch. To-night, Miss Louise Leightou aB "Agathe ;" Mr. T. W. Eckert as "Max." 



WINTER GARDEN, 



Stockton street, between Post and Sutter streets. --Stahl A- 
Maack, Proprietors. Continued Success Nightly of the WINTER GARDEN 
OPERA COMPANY, in John Burnett's Romantic Spectacular Opera of 

JEOIilA! 

or, THE MOUNTAIN SYLPH. Until further notice will be continued with its Mys- 
terious Illusions, Startling Mechanical Effects and Gorgeous Scenic and Transforma- 
tion Achievement. MISS ETHEL LYNTON and MR. FRED. BORNEMANN in the 
title roles. Grand Incantation Scene and Rendezvous of the Wizard of the Glen. 
Salamanders, Caverns, Sylph Land on Silver Lake, Palace of the Queen and Home of 
the Sylphs. Jul y 15. 

SEASIDE GARDEN! 

Presidio. Terminus of Union-street Cable Road. EVERY 
WEDNESDAY, SATURDAY and SUNDAY, GRAND GALA CONCERT by 
the Full United States Presidio Band, of 24 Pieces. Commencing at 12 m. Carl 
Sreyer, Director. Admission, FREE. lJuly 15.] P. H. HINK, Proprietor. 

L. LANSZWEERT, 

ANALYTICAL AND CONSULTING CHEMIST, 

300 FOURTH STB.BJEX, SAN FSAJfCISCO. 

[July 16.] 



July 15, 1882. 



CALIFORNIA ADVERTISER. 



SPORTING ITEMS. 



In speaking of the regatta at Long Bridge last week, I was led into an 
error in reference to the decision of Charles Gale, the referee in the four- 
oared *hell race. Unintentionally I did the Ariel crew an injustice; they 
were in no way to blame for what occurred after the race, and. from the 
statement of the case made by Mr. Gale himself, it appears that, if any 
error was made, he alone was to blame. The start was very uneven, the 
Pioneers getting the worst of it. Some distance down the course, a y.ivht, 
which had moored riyht in the track of the boats, forced the Pioneers to 
pull out of their line. In returning to their water, they ran across the 
South End boat, and a foul occurred, which, however, in no way impeded 
the South Ends. The Pioneer crew turned the wrong stake boat, as they 
hod a perfect right to do at their own peril, and by hard work beat the 
Ariel boat about half a length, the South Ends being hopelessly beaten. 
The Ariel crew claimed a foul, on the ground that the Pioneers had 
turned the wrong stake -boat This the referee very properly disallowed, 
but reserved his decision on the race. Very much to the surprise of all, 
he declared the Pioneers disqualified for fouling the South Ends, and or- 
dered the Ariels and South Ends to row over for the money. He cer- 
tainly had no right to do this, for the South Ends waived all claim to a 
foul, and the Ariels made no complaint. The judges in the race agreed 
that the Pioneers had won the race, and were entitled to the prize; and, 
as no appeal or complaint was made from their decision, the referee had 
no right to make any ruling at all. With all due respect for Mr. Gale's 
knowledge of rowing-rules, and with the positive assurance that he in- 
tended to do exactly what was right, I must say that he committed an 
egregious error. It is a well -understood rule, in all athletic events, 
that the functions of a referee, when there are judges, do not commence 
until the judges disagree, or until an appeal is taken from their decision. 
In this race the judges did not disagree, and no appeal was made to the 
referee by any interested party. No protest or claim of foul was made by 
the Ariels or South Ends before they left their boats, and Mr. Gale had 
no more right to volunteer a decision than any other outsider. The rule in 
reference to fouls distinctly says: "The referee, when appealed to, shall 
decide," etc., etc It is plain that the rule, by defining the time when 
the referee shall decide to be when appealed to, limits his power to make 
a decision to that specific time, and as plainly as the English language 
can convey an idea, prohibits him from taking any action on a foul until 
he is appealed to. The method of making an appeal is too well under- 
stood to need defining here. By the accepted definition of the rules, Mr. 
Gale had no right to disqualify the Pioneers for a foul, because, so far as 
he was concerned, no foul had been committed. The rule in rowing law 
is the same as in commercial law, and I wonder what Mr. Gale would 
think of Judge Rix should that worthy gentleman sentence a man to 
prison for a crime before the case had been formally brought before him 
for trial. Looking at the decision from the common -sense equities of the 
case, Mr. Gale had even less foundation for his decision than from a 
legal view. The boat impeded, if the foul caused any impediment at all, 
was the South Ends. They were hopelessly beaten, and distinctly waived 
all claim to a fouL The Ariels were in no way interfered with, and were 
beaten by the Pioneers on their merits. The regatta was in the nature of 
a friendly contest, and the rulings of the referee especially, as no agree- 
ment was made to adopt any specific code of rules should all have 
been made with a view to give the prizes to the best crews. 
The effect of Mr. Gale's decision in this case is to bar 
out the best crew and allow the beaten crews to row over for the prizes. 
He should have borne in mind that money was bet on the race, and that 
the bets will have to go with the race, and that the effect of his needless 
interference in a matter that was not properly before him for considera- 
tion will be to cause a great deal of trouble and annoyance to the betters 
and stakeholders. Those who bet on the Pioneers will naturally protest 
against the paying over of their money, and the possible outcome of the 
affair will be to bring the rules of rowing to the attention of some of the 
Justice Courts. — Fred. Smith and SamU Watkins, of the Ariel Club, 
easily defeated Peter Burns and John Desmond a double-scull Whitehall 
boat race last Sunday. The course was from Vallej^ street wharf around 
Goat Island and return, and the time made 49 minutes.— The match 
between Thomas Flynn, of the Pioneers, and Leander Stevenson, of the 
Ariels, will come off next Suuday morning over the Long Bridge course. 
Both men are confident of winning, and the contest is expected to be a 
close and exciting one, but if Flynn can only manage to steer a decent 
course, and abstain from running into wharves and ships at anchor, he 
ought to win easily. He has far the better boat of the two and has also 
more stamina than Stevenson.— —Watkins, of the Ariels, and Griffin, 
of the Pioneers, are matched for a three-mile race over the Long Bridge 
course. If Watkins allows Griffin to beat him he ought never to get in 
a shell again. He has all the advantages of size, strength and experience, 
Griffin being a comparatively new acquisition to the ranks of local oars- 
men.— Hanlan has recovered from his late sickness, and is out with a 
challenge to row any five men in the world at intervals of two days. If 
he can get this match on he will give up his proposed trip to Australia. 
* # # * * 

I am not much given to enthusing over glove-fights, as I believe them 
to be, in a general way, nothing but scaly subterfuges to tap the public 
purse for admission to a second-rate sparring exhibition, under the pre- 
tense that it is going to be a real mill. The regular programme in such 
cases is to sign articles for about S1.000 a side, select a decent, responsible 
man as stakeholder, for a blind, whisper all around town that the gloves 
will be very thin — simply common driving gloves— hire a large hall, rake 
in the dollars, and then all hands go home after a light set-to, and divide 
the gate money. The glove-fight arranged to take place shortly between 
Owen Judge and Dan O'Connell — not O'Connell, the poet — will, I ex- 
pect, be a departure from the stereotyped plan. In the first place, the 
promoter, Patsey Hogan, distinctly announces that, so far as he is con* 
cerned, he has gotten it up for the sake of making money, but he has not 
taken in as partners the two men who are to fight. For them he has put 
up $250, which the winner will get whether the gate is $5 or $500. Ho- 
gan is not the cleverest boxer in the world, but he possesses a heap of 
manly courage, and is one of the very few pugilists whom I have known 
that could tell the truth. He has always kept his word to his backers 
and to the public, and to my knowledge has declined, on two occasions, 
to make money by shady achemess. Consequently, though I care nothing 
for the financial success of this glove-fight, I go out of my way to speak of 



the honesty of its projector, because I find pugiliHtic honor so rare in 
San Francisco that the article is liable to die out altogether unless it is 
carefully fostrriil. Owen Judge has been aching br* tight for a long 
time. He is u natural fighter, and a rather clever boxer at close quarters. 
He bos the appearance and manners of a game man, and can tak>- pun 
ishment well, but he lacks coolness and judgment in the ring, and I bo- 
Heve that the namesake of the illustrious Irishman will whip him hand- 
somely in less than forty minute*. There to nothing certain, however, 
about this, for Judge is "death on a hot rally," and is liable to box his 
man down or knock him out early in the hyht. He is a "rusher'' like Sul- 
livan on a small scale, but he does not know as much about the tricks of 
the ring as the Boston man. He is lazy and does not take his training 
work well, and, as the fight is at catch weights, is Bure to slur his 

E reparation, especially as be puts up no money and has no backer to force 
im to take his proper amount of work. Those who attend the mill to 
see "slogging" will not be disappointed, and should the tight only last 
three or four rounds (QueenBbury rules), it will be warm enough to please 
all.-^— I fancy that Sullivan has a higher contract than he imagines in 
attempting to knock "Tug" WilBon out in four rounds. Wilsou has not 
as yet shown himself to be as good a man as Tom Sayers, but he is one 
of the kind that are hard to beat. He is a glutton for blows, and does 
not know when he is really beaten. Should Sullivan dispose of him as 
easily as he did of Elliott and Ryan, Fox had better give up hiB attempt 
to get even for Ryan's defeat. To those who imagine that the disparity 
in size is all in favor of Sullivan, I will say that Wilson is just half an 
inch shorter than was Tom Sayers, but, with that exception, is a bigger 
man all around. 

« * # * * 

At the Gun Club shoot, last Saturday, J. K. Orr carried off the honors 
of the day by killing 29 out of 31, Hurlingham rules. He was beaten for 
the medal, but made his record shooting off the tie for Mr. Babcock.^— 
The Prince of Wales and Duke of Cambridge will subscribe toward the 
fund for sending the rifle team to America. The total subscriptions now 
amount to £542. There will be a tiual and exhaustive test for the selec- 
tion of teams shortly after the shoocing at Wimbledon.-^— Deer shooting 
is above the average this season. Harry Hook killed four bucks in two 
days on De Long's ranch last week without dogs.^^A clay pigeon tour- 
nament was held at the grounds of the Alameda County Sportsman's 
Club laat Saturday. There were fourteen entries, fifteen birds each, fif- 
teen yards rise. Mr. Crellin won first money, Messrs. Tuttle and Schna- 
ble, tying on thirteen birds each, divided second and third, and Mr. 
Adams broke twelve birds and secured fourth money.-^— Dove shooting 
is excellent on the southern part of this peninsula. Between Redwood 
and Honda bags of five and six dozen have been made by several sports- 
men. 

* * * * * * 

Hyde Bowie is still at Santa Cruz with his yacht Nellie. —The new 
Club is to be called the "Bohemian Yacht Club," and its membership is 
to be limited to five yacht-owners, the roll being already filled. To Mr. 
Gutte has been delegated the task of arranging the house, and as soon as 
it iB all in order a formal opening-day will be announced.— —Commodore 
McDonough brought the Aggie up from Monterey in a trifle under 24 
hours. 

If you want to learn how to dance, read J. William Frazer's adver- 
tisement in this paper to-day. The terms are very low — no one can grum- 
ble at such rates, if your means are limited. 

hsmovaij. 



T HW OFFICE OF THE 

NAFA SODA AGENCY 

HAS REMOVED TO 

ISO New Montgomery Street. 

DO YOU WANT TO 

LEARN HOW TO DANCE ? 

If so. Join one of my Special Classes for 10 Lcssous, Day or Evening. 

Ladies $G Each. 

Gentlemen. $8 " 

Saratoga Hall Socials Free to Popils. 

These low terms will only be in force until August 15th. Improve the opportu- 
nity and learn for less than ONE-HALF the regular price. 

Apply in person. Office hours, 10 to 11, 1 to 3 and 7 to 9. Strictly privat 
tuition a specialty. J. WILLIAM FBAZEB, 

July 15. Pbelau Building. 

P. N. tteuval. W. S. Somervell. 

PACIFIC ASPHALTUM COMPANY. 

Established 1865. 

Proprietors of the Celebrated Corral de Piedi-a [Asphaltum Mine, 

(San Louis Obispo Couuty). 

Dealers in Crude and Refined 

ASPHALTUM, FELT AND ROOFING MATERIAL. 

Prepared Asphaltuin for Country Orders always on hand. Contractors for Side- 
walks, Roofs, Floors and General Asphaltum Work. All Work Guaranteed. 
Offlceand Depot, 420 JacTcson. \ Branch Office ,422 Montgomery ,S.F. 

TURKISH AND RUSSIAN 

Steam Baths; Electric and Chemical Bbtlis; Snlphar and 
and other medicated vapor baths, with Swedish movements and massage. 
Special apartments for ladies and families. DR. JUSTIN GATES, 

July 1. 722 Montgomery street, near Washington. 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER AND 



July 15, 1882. 




"The World," the Flesh, and the Devil. 

[By a Truthful Penman.] 

A touching story of a dog's affection is related by the Paris Figaro. 
The young equestrienne, M'lle. Loisset, whose early death, owing to a 
fall from her horse lately excited eo much sympathy, had a favorite dog, 
a huge creature called Turk, which was her inseparable companion, es- 
corting her to and from the cirque, and guarding her dressing-room while 
she was engaged in the performance. The day after her death Turk ar- 
rived at the cirque at the usual hour, waited till the representation was 
over, and then went away with his tail between his legs. For several 
days he came back at the. same time, refusing to eat or drink, or 
to go home with any of his former friends, and occasionally tittering a 
plaintive howl. At last the dog disappeared, and, from all appearances, 
has crept away into some corner to die.— The United States Govern- 
ment is going to increase its revenue returns by stamping each cigar that 
is made or imported. Formerly it was sufficient to stamp the box that 
contained the cigars; but, singularly enough, the idea occurred to some 
innocent minds of refilling the empty but still stamped cigar-boxes.-— 
To commemorate the centennial of the city of Bangkok, and of the 
present dynasty, H. M. tbe King recently entrusted Mr. J. W. Benson, 
of Old Bond street, with an order for medals to be worn on the occasion. 
Some of these are in pure gold, and others in silver gilt with red or yel- 
low gold, silvered bmnze and pure bronze. On the face are the busts of 
the five sovereigns of Siam of this line, with the full state robes of their 
times. Around the bust are inscribed, in Siamese, the names and titles 
under which they were respectively known. Surrounding the medal, 
spreading outward, are one hundred rays, typical of the centenary, which 
form a very effective bordering. On the reverse is an inscription in Siam- 
ese. ^— New York jewelers say the rage for wearing jeweled garters is 
spreading. They are designed to match the tint of the dress worn with 
them. One of the most expensive cost §1,400. In this the lace and pearl- 
colored silk band was joined by an elaborate clasp. On one side was the 
lady's monogram in pearls; on the other, the coat of arms, with frosted 
stork's head, a crest of delicately carved gold, and a motto set in chip dia- 
monds. It was a present from a mother to her daughter, who is to be 
married soon. Her husband will be a Knight of the Garter.— -Mr. 
Robert laddie has lately completed the first breech-loading whale-gun 
ever manufactured. It bears a close resemblance to the ordinary breech- 
loading rifle. The gun has a rebounding lock, the length of barrel is 3 ft., 
calibre 1 5-16 in., and weight 105 lbs. At a distance of 30 or 40 yards it 
will project a harpoon or bomb lance with great accuracy and force. ^— 
In pulling down an architect's house in the Rue Vieille du Temple, 
Paris, some workmen have discovered, hidden in an old wall, a copper 
vessel said to contain forty kilogrammes of gold coins in the reigns of 
Jean le Bon and Charles V. Supposing the quantity of gold to be really 
as large as represented, it would be worth as metal alone over £5,000.'^— 
It is stated that General Ignatieff s dismissal took place under the fol- 
lowing circumstances: The General went to Peterhoff and had an inter- 
view with the Czar. After some time the Count requested His Majesty 
to affix hia signature to several documents which he brought with him, 
and with reference to one of them he remarked that he need not trouble 
himself to read it. This threw His Majesty into a violent passion, dur- 
ing which it is reported that he used the most severe terms. General Ig- 
natieff was ordered to resign immediately and quit the room without delay. 
^— There is a rose craze in New York, and the mania has gone so far 
that it is stated that millionaires are investing in their culture, as there is 
large profit in it at present prices. There are four millionaires in Madi- 
son, New Jersey, one in Summit, and two in Orange who have capital in 
the business. On Long Island there are vast stretches of greenhouses, 
and about Boston there is noticeable the same growth in the business. ■ 
A mysterious story of suicide comes from Linz, near Vienna. The 
bodies of two young French ladies were found in the Park. The circum- 
stances attending the discovery leave no doubt as to suicide in both caseB. 
Two small five -chambered revolvers were found next to them, and bullet 
wounds on both. An entire family, consisting of six persons, have 
been poisoned at Mureaux, in the department of the Seine-et-Oise, 
through eating poisonous fungi. Medical aid was summoned but all died 
in fearful agony. The victims are a mother, her three daughters (aged 29, 
19 and 15 years respectively), her son (aged 14) and her Bon-in-law.^— 
Many of the navvies who are employed in the St. Gothard Tunnel are 
still suffering from anaemia and other ailments arising from the bad air 
and high temperature in which they were compelled to work. The Ital- 
ian Government are organizing for their reception a sanitarium high up 
on the St. Gothard ; pure mountain air being the most efficient remedy 
for diseases of thiB dass.-^Frince Bismarck has just presented to 
the botanical garden at Dnsseldorf a large tame wolf, which was given to 
him some time ago by a Russian Prince. ^— A curious chapter might 
be written on what suggested celebrated books, and an item in it should 
be, " What led to Moore's Irish Melodies coming into being." The well- 
to-do parents of James Power, of the ancient borough of Galway, ap- 
prenticed the boy to a pewterer there. The bugler of a regiment needed 
repairs to his bugle. Power cleverly made them. This gained him a gar- 
rison reputation, which ultimately led to his starting as a musical instru- 
ment maker in Dublin, where he became acquainted with Moore, and 
after publishing a few Bongs for him, contracted for a set of twelve, 
adapted to Irish melodies by Sir John Stevenson. A commence- 
ment has been made with new dock works at Boston, England, the day 
being observed as a general holiday in the borough. Mrs. Simonds, the 
wife of the Mayor, turned the first sod at the site of the works, and a 
banquet in celebration of the occasion took place. The dock will com- 
prise a water area of seven acres, and is estimated to cost $600,000. 



INSURANCE. 



HUTCHINSON & MANN, 

INSURANCE AGENCY, 
No. 322 <v 324 California Street, 



San Francisco, Cal. 



Fixe Insurance. 



GIRARD of Philadelphia. 

NEW YORK CITY INS. CO of N. Y. 

NEW ORLEANS ASSOCIATION 

PEOPLES of Newark. 

W ATERTOWN of New York. 

ST. PAUL of St. Paul. 



TEUTON1A of New Orleans. 

LACONPIANCB of Paris. 

DWELLING HOUSE UNDERWRITERS 

of New York. 

THE FIREINS. ASSOCIATION (Limited) 

of London, England. 

Marine Insurance* 

LONDON AND PROVINCIAL MARINE INSURANCE CO of London. 

LA FONCIERE MARINE INSURANCE COMPANY of Paris. 

Capital Represented $27,000,000. 

All Losses Equitably Adjusted and Promptly Paid. 

W. L. CHALMERS, 
Special Agent and Adjuster. 

AGGREGATE ASSETS, 

84 0,64X942 . 

Imperial Fire Insurance Co., of London Instituted 1803. 

London Assurance Corporation, of London 

Established by Royal Charter 1720. 

Northern Assurance Corporation, of London Established 1836. 

Queen Insurance Company, of Liverpool. Established 1867. 

A JOINT POLICY ISSUBD BT THE FOUR COMPANIES. 

BOBEBT DICKSON, Manager. 
W. LANE BOOKBB, Agent and Attorney. 
S.E. Cor. California and Montgomery Sts., Safe Deposit Building. 
[October 11. J 

PHQ-NIX ASSURANCE COMPANY 

Of London, Eng., EstaVd 1782.— Cash Assets, 85,266,372.35. 

BRITISH AMERICA ASSURANCE COMPANY 

Of Toronto, Can., EstaVd 1833.— Cash Assets, $1,343,908.54 

WESTERN ASSURANCE COMPANY 

Of Toronto, Can., Estab'd 1 851 Cash Assets, $1,357,326.39. 

Bl iTI.EB A- HALDAN, 
General Agents for Pacific Coast, 

413 California Street San Francisco. 

[July 10.1 

HOME MUTUAL INSURANCE COMPANY, OF CALIFORNIA. 

Organized 1864. 
Principal Offloe 406 California Street, S. F. 

FIRE INSURANCE. 

Capital (Paid Tip in TJ. S. Gold Coin) $300,000.00 

He-Insurance Reserve $171,413 75 



ABsete January 1, 1882 S 684,577.83 I Premiums, since orj*amzauon.$3,S41,412.u7 

Surplus for policyholders.. 674,577.83 | Losses, since organization... 1,756,278.00 

OFFICEBS: 

J. P. HOUGHTON President. I CHAS. K. STOKT Secretary. 

J. L. N. SHEPHAB1).... Vice-President. | R. H. MAGILL General Agent. 

Directors of the Home Mutual Insurance Co.:— L. L. Baker, H. L. Dodge, J. L. 
N. Shepard, John Currey, J. F. Houghton, W. T. Garratt, C. C. Burr, J. S. Carter, 
Charles Belding, D. W. Earl. April 8. 

COMMERCIAL UNION ASSURANCE COMPANY, 

(OF LONDON). 
Pacific Coast Branch 210 Sansome Street. S. F. 



Capital Subscribed 812,500,000 

Capital Paid In 1,250,000 

Total Cash Assets 9,698,571 

6^** This first-class Company will transact a General Marine Insurance 
Business. JOHN BAB HAMILTON, Manager. 

J. L. WOODS, Secretory. Sept. 10. 

PACIFIC DEPARTMENT 

LONDON AND LANCASHIRE FIRE INSURANCE COMPANY 

OF LIVERPOOL. 

Capital $7,600,000 

Cash Assets 1,709,976 

Cash Assets in United States 775,003 

BALFOUR, a I'TH KIE A CO., General Agents, 

March 20. 316 California Street, San Francisco. 

FIRE AND MARINE INSURANCE-UNION INS. CO. OF S. F. 

The California Lloyds. — Established in lS61.---B.os. 416 and 
418 California street. Cash Capital, §750,000 in Gold Coin. Fair Rates ! 
Prompt Settlement of Loses ! ! Solid Security ! ! DIRECTORS. —J. Mora Moss, 
Moses Heller, J. O. Eldridge, M. J. O'Connor, R. S. Floyd, Daniel Meyer, Adam 
Grant, A. E. Sabatie, Charles Kohler, E. L. Goldstein, Bartlett Doe, I. Lawrence 
Pool, A. Weill, I. Steinhart, N. B. Stone, Wallace Everson, A. B. Phipps, Samuel 
Hort, H. C. Parker, N. G. Kittle, Joseph Brandenstein, W. M, Hoag, Nicholas 
Luning, James Moffltt, John Parrott, J. Baum, M. D. Sweeney, Gustave Touchard, 
George C. Hickox, J. H. Freeman, John Conly, J. H. Baird, Wm. Scbolle, Charles 
Baum, J. G. Kittle. Benjamin Brewster, Isaac L, Requa. 

GUSTAVE TOUCHARD, President. N. G. KITTLE, Vice-President. 

Jambs D. Bailey, Secretary. Gbo. T. Bohbn, Surveyor. Nov. 6. 



July 15, 1882. 



CALIFORNIA ADVERTISER. 



TO A DOLL. 

You m»y hit Bin by luck than by merit 

Tilt t. »■>[•• nf unit diet ttttla yirl, 
Who liiw* lately bean born to Inherit 

Thf eotn end Htatai "f no Karl. 
Bhfl "ill W«\it yon sometimes in a p&asion, 

And pull out y»ur hair in a pet: 
But you'll nee a lot more of " tlie fashion " 

Than ever yon looked upon yet. 

After all, there are many poor dollies 

As anxiouH at* you to be Bold ; 
Not the leant of the world's little follies 

Consists in the worship of Kold. 
It is ever the same bitter story 

Of riches "f beauty— of trade; 
And Mayfair at the hik'ht of its elory 

Is much like the Lowther Arcade. — H. S. Leigh. 

THE LATE JOHN SCOTT RUSSELL 

Mr. Scott Russell, the eminent engineer, died on the Stb of June at 
Veninor, hie of Wight, in the 75th year of his age. John Scott RuBsell, 
nooordtnfi to Engineering, was the eldest son of the Rev. David Russell, a 
Sootcfa cwrgyroen. He was born in 1808, and was originally destined for 
the Church* His great predilection for mechanics and other natural sci- 
ences induced his father to allow him to enter a workshop to learn the 
handicraft of the profession of an engiueer. He subsequently studied at 
the Universities oi Edinburgh, St. Andrews and Glasgow, and graduated 
at the latter at the early sge "f sixteen. About the year 1832 he com- 
menced his famous researches into the nature of waves, with the view of 
improving the forms of vessels. He discovered during these researches 
the existence of the wave of translation, and developed the wave-line 
system of construction of Bhipe in connection with which his name is now 
so widely known. The first vessel on the wave system was called the 
Wave, and was built in 1835 ; it was followed in 1836 by the Scott Russell, 
and in 1831* by the Flamftetitt and Fire Kino. Mr. Scott Russell was em- 
ployed at this time as manager of the large shipbuilding establishment at 
Greenock, now owned by Messrs. Caird & Co. In this capacity he suc- 
ceeded in haviny his system employed in the construction of the new fleet 
of the West India Royal Mail Company, and four of the largest and fast- 
est of these vessels — viz, the Teviut, the Tay, the Clyde and the Tweed — 
were built and designed by himself. He was joint secretary with Sir 
Stafford Northcote of the Great Exhibition of 1851. He was, in fact, one 
of the three original promoters of the Exhibition, and under the direction 
of the late Prince Consort took a leading part in organizing it. Mr. 
Scott Russell was for many years known as a shipbuilder on the Thames. 
The most important work he ever constructed was the Great Eastern 
steamship, which he contracted to build for a company of which the late 
Mr. Brunei was the engineer. The Great Eastern, whatever may have 
been her commercial failings, was undoubtedly a triumph of technical 
skill. She was built on the wave-line system of shape, and was con- 
structed on the longitudinal double skin principle, which also was in- 
vented by Mr. Scott Russell. Mr. Scott Russell was one of the earliest 
and most active advocates of ironclad men-of-war, and he has the merit 
of having heen the joint designer of our first sea-going armor frigate, the 
Warrior. His greatest engineering work was, without doubt, the vast 
dome of the Vienna Exhibition of 1873. 



FROUDE ON THE SOUTH AFRICAN QUESTION. 
Mr. Froude has written a long and most interesting letter to the Abo- 
rigines' Protection Society, regretting that he cannot attend their annual 
meeting, and expressing his views on the South African question. He is 
known to have very strongly disapproved of recent colonial policy. He 
wished the whole of South Africa to be declared a Crown colony, in 
which the Imperial Government might act as just arbiter between the 
colonists, Englishmen and Boers, and the native races. With a deep 
pang of sorrow he confesses that this policy is no longer possible. The 
Colonial Office cannot rule South Africa, and says that it cannot rule. 
There is only one other alternative — the colonists must be taught to re- 
spect the natives ; and Mr. Froude rejoices at the recent successes of the 
Basutos as tending to have the effect of destroying the contempt for the 
blacks which he deplored when he was Lord Carnarvon's agent in South 
Africa. He would now replace Cetewayo on his throne, allow the natives 
to have their own arms, and leave them to deal with Englishmen and 
with their ancient enemies, the Boers. The latter, he adds, would proba- 
bly have been their enemies had not Great Britain rashly meddled with 
their affairs. Mr. Froude's tardy conversion to this view is very signiheant. 

Some interesting experiments have been made at the site of the pro- 
posed harbor of refuge, Dungeness Point, by Captain the Hon. H. W. 
Chetwynd, R.N., District Inspector of Lifeboats, in the direction of test- 
ing the value of oil in calming rough water. There was a sufficiently 
heavy sea at the time of the experiment to endanger a small open boat, 
and the Dungeness lifeboat, the David Halett, was launched, and anchored 
in five fathoms of water. A small canvas bag, containing about half a 
gallon of oil, and pierced with several holes with a large needle, was at- 
tached to the anchor as a buoy. This had the effect of producing a space 
of still water spreading from the buoy to a distance of about twenty yards 
wide, and of considerable length. These trials are considered satisfac- 
tory, but not conclusive, and it is stated that they will be continued. 

Noise is the music of industry. That will do on general principles, 
but when the sweet little cherub of the household is trying to work the 
tight fitting cover off a glass jar full of jam without his mother's knowing 
it, there isn't much noise in the operation, yet where can be found a bet- 
ter exrmple of industry. 



Mothers, Take Notice. — Taber, photographer, has just received from 
the East a supply of extremely sensitive gelatine dry plates, by the use 
of which he skillfully and quickly Becures the most pleasing results in 
making instantaneous pictures of young children. Mothers who have not 
heretofore been able to secure satisfactory pictures of the little ones, 
would do well to make appointment for sittings. 



INSURANCE. 



The Only Company on the Pacific Coaat Governed by the Maaaa- 
ohueetta Non-Forfeiture Law. 



NEW ENGLAND MUTUAL LIFE INSURANCE COMPANY, 

OF BOSTON. 

[IKCOBfOKATBIt ls:ir..\ 



A«.ot» 



. S16.OOO.0OO. 



This Oonrpany is Purely Mutual, and has trammeled the businevi <<f Life Insurance 
for nearly forty years. All Its policios are issued under and governed by the lawn 
of Massachusetts, which provide that: 

First -No policy shall become forfeited or void tor non-payment of Premium, after 
the payment of TWO Annual Premiums. 

Second— In default of payment of subsequent Premiums, It in binding on tbc 
Company to issue a Paid-up Policy, as provided for according to Die published tables. 

The above conditions aru available to all Policy •holders, who become such after 
Jan. 1, 1881, without further negotiation or stipulation or notification on ihcir pan . 

Whenever, after the payment of TWO Annual Premiums, as aforesaid, the insura- 
ble interest in the life of the insured has terminated, the net value of the jtolicy, sub- 
ject to certain conditions named in said Nonforfeiture Law, is made a surrender 
value payable in Cosh. Distributions of Surplus are mode annually on the Contri- 
bution system and are progressive. Liberality and Equity in its relations with Pol- 
icy-holders have always been the governing principles of this Company, and the con- 
ditio as of its Policies' in regard to limits of Residence and Travel are of the most 
liberal description. 

|y Before insuring in any Company, carefully read the Application aod Form of 
Policy used by the NEW ENGLAND LIFE. 

HENRY K. FIELD, General Agent. 
Office: 328 Montgomery Street (Safe Deposit Building), San Francisco. 

THE SWISS MARINE INS. COMPANIES COMBINED. 

Switzerland, orzurlch, Capital 5, 000,000 francs; Helvetia, 
Of St. Gall, Capital 10,000,000 francs ; BaloiBC, of Basle, Capital 6,000,000 francs. 
These three Companies ore liable jointly and severally for all losses that may be sus- 
aihed. Losses made [myablo in all the principal seaports of the world. In the set- 
tlement of all claimB under an English policy, these Companies will strictly adhere to 
the conditions and customs adopted at Lloyds, and submit to English jurisdiction. 
June 9. HARRY W. SYZ, Agent, 225 Sansomc St., S. F. 

BRITISH AND FOREIGN MARINE INS. CO. OF LIVERPOOL. 

(Capital 90,000,000.— Agents: Balfour, Guthrie & Co., No. 
J 316 California street, San Francisco. Nov. 18. 

JOHN WIGMORE, 

HARDWOOD LUMBER, 

SHIP TIMBER, LOCUST TREENAILS, 

Veneers and Fancy Woods. 

129 to 147 Spear St. and 26 and 28 Howard St., San Francisco. 

[April 8.] 

THOMAS PRICE'S 

ASSAY OFFICE AND CHEMICAL LABORATORY, 

524 Sacramento Street San Francisco. 

Deposits of Bullion received, melted Into bars, and returns 
made in from twenty-four to forty-eight hours. 
Bullion can be forwarded to this office from any part of the interior by express, 
mil returns made in the same manner. 
Careful Analysis made of Ores, Metal, Soils, Waters, Industrial Products, eter 
Mines examined and reported upon. Consultations on Chemical and Metallurgical 
questions. March 20. 

LEE CRAIG, 

SEARCHER OF RECORDS. 

Notary Public and Commissioner of Deeds, 

316 Montgomery Street Bet. California and Fine. 

Commissioner for New York, Arizona, Nevada, Pennsylvania, Utah, Oregon, Idaho 
Washington Territory, Ohio, Massachusetts, New Hampshire, Illinois, New Jersey, 
and other States and Territories. DEPOSITIONS A SPECIALTY. Acknowledg- 
ments taken and oaths administered at any hour of the day or night. 

May 13. LEE D. CRAIG. 

SANTA CRUZ FURNISHED HOUSES, 

From S25 Per Month, in the Best Locations* 
EXCHANGE AND MART Santa Cruz, Cal. 



No. 2 of the new Land Joi'RSAL, of Santa Cruz county, containing full details of 
Real Estate for sale, soil, climate, productions, etc., FREE BY MAIL. May 27. 

WILLIAM A. SCOn, JR. 

Money wanted on improved city property In Tucson, A.T., 
and on paying property in the vicinity, in sums to suit the lender, at from 1 
to H per cent. Mining property handled. Address, 

" WILLIAM A. SCOTT, JR., 

Stock, Commission, Insurance Broker and General Agent, 
April 22. 7 Camp street, Tucson, Arizona Territory. 

AUGUSTUS LAYER, 

Architect* 

Furnishes Plans, Specifications auA Superintendence for 
the Construction or Renovation of Dwelling Housea, and every describtion of 
Building. Office: 19 S. F. STOCK EXCHANGE, Pine street, S. F. 
IS' Take the Elevator. Dec- 10- 

n»blTcET~ 

lor the very best photographs go to Bradley * Bulolson's, 

in an Elevator, 429 Montgomery street. Oct. 29 

$5 tO $20 ■""'"""' m "- Sam IddrS 8 I Sxgao ; K^Co.:PortW, Maine 



P 



10 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER AND 



July 15, 1882. 




EGYPT. 

In writing of the Egyptian question it is unnecessary to enter minutely 
into retrospective details. The story of the trouble is already an old one. 
The indebtedness of Egypt, brought on mainly by the reckless extrava- 
gance of the late Khedive, Ismael I., and added to by the extortionate 
demands for tribute made by Ismael's suzerain, the Sultan of Turkey; the 
consequent clamoring of European creditors ; the weak government and 
poor management of the well-meaning Tewfik ; the rising of the soldiery, 
instigated and led by Arabi— all these are matters of history with which 
every intelligent person is familiar. It remains for us, therefore, to con- 
sider the present situation and speculate upon its future results. 

At the present time of writing John Bull is having everything his own 
way, not only by virtue of his own deeds, but also with the consent and 
approbation of all the great European Powers. There is, of course, 
nothing surprising about the fact that the British fleet has silenced the 
Alexandrian forts. That was a foregone conclusion, and Englishmen will 
only pride themselves upon the achievement in so far as it abundantly 
proves that their ships of war, instead of being the "expensive toys" 
that foreign critics have derisively called them, are, in real earnest, more 
than a match for the strongest land fortifications erected upon any coast 
in the world. For though it may be truly asserted that Egypt is a weak 
power, still it is a fact that the Alexandrian forts were so well manned 
and so heavily armed that their fire put the big iron-clads to as severe a 
test as could be desired. This is the first time that these floating monsters 
have been tried in actual warfare, and the result must be very gratifying 
to the nation that expended so much ingenuity, labor and money on their 
construction. 

But though the victory of the British is easily understood, the attitude 
of the other Powers affords abundant scope for conjecture. The question 
on everybody's lips seems to be : " Won't this Egyptian row lead to a 
general European war ? " Nothing could be more absurd than for an out- 
sider to attempt prophecy in such a case. One might as well predict the 
day and hour when Gabriel will blow his trumpet as forecast the action 
of the Powers at the present moment. But it is not a difficult matter to 
review the situation as it stands. It is about as follows : France hasn't 
shown the white feather, but her rulers (and they are too many) have cer- 
tainly been over cautious. The Gallic Cock entered the present trouble 
in professed concert with the British Lion. It was understood that they 
were to stand or fall (which latter wasn't likely) by one another. Chan- 
ticleer crowed so loudly at first that his voice almost smothered the deep 
growl of the King of Beasts. But it has since appeared that the French 
Cock wasn't of the game kind — the egg which contained him having 
unfortunately been laid too close to a barn-door. To drop metaphor- 
France has not done what we in America call "the square thing. She 
stole a, march in Tunis because she knew that England would not object ; 
it being understood, as we said some weeks ago, that Egypt should be 
England's prey. The time has come for the fulfillment of the bargain, 
and now France is wonderfully neutral. The moment a bombardment is 
promised by the English Admiral the French fleet gets out of reach of the 
Egyptian guns and proceeds to " take possession" of Port Said, at the 
mouth of the Suez Canal. It will be interesting to note how long this 
possession " lasts. 

Germany — or, rather, Bismarck— seems to look on quietly; but no one 
doubts that old "Blood and Iron" will show his hand when the time 
comes. Bismarck doesn't sympathize with England because he loves her, 
but he shudders at the dream of an Anglo-French alliance, and is only too 
glad to dispel it by pretentiously acknowledging that England is justified 
in doing what she likes. The German Chancellor knows that England 
would do that anyhow, but it suits his present purpose to be particu- 
larly complacent toward John Bull. 



Austria has little to say in the matter. She is under Bismarck's thumb, 
and fears above all things that he might turn loose the Russian Bear upon 
the eastern portion of her motley domain, in which case the western 
portion thereof would be speedily merged into the German Empire. 

Italy, like the traditional parrot, "doesn't talk much, but keeps up a 
devil of a thinking." There is no such thing as international justice, but 
if there were, the voice of Italy would be entitled to much respect. No 
country has greater interests in the Mediterranean than Italy. She lies, 
as it were, in the midst of its waters. Her eastern, western and southern 
coasts are washed by its waves, and it is her misfortune that on the north 
she has to constantly watch for a land invasion by her ancient enemy, 
Austria. 

Russia is out of the count. She has no fleet, and can take no part in 
the squabble, so far as Egypt is concerned. At the same time, she must 
naturally look moBt eagerly to the result. The question of England gain- 
ing Egypt is of vital importance to Russia, implying, as it does, the pos- 
session of the water highway to India. Not that Russia ever expects to 
get Egypt herself — that she knows is impossible; but the sovereignty of 
the Suez Canal by England is an awful bugbear to the Muscovite. Rus- 
sia is doing her best to get to India by the overland route thruugh Asia — 
and she will probably meet her match when the Lion grapples the Bear 
on the summit of the Himalayas — or thereabouts. But at the same time 
it must be very annoying to the Czar and his subjects to see England 
gaining such ready accession to her Oriental dominions, as she must when 
once absolute mistress of the Canal. 

Turkey is a tool, to be used by any power that can lend her the most 
money and scare her by the biggest guns. England is able to do this just 
now — more particularly so far as the latter part of the bargain is 
concerned. 

THE AMERICAN PASHA. 
General Charles P. Stone, formerly of the United States Army, a 
graduate of West Point, and a resident some years since of this city, is 
probably the only American in the Egyptian service. Soon after the 
close of the civil war a number of Confederate officers enlisted in the 
service of the Khedive, among others General Thad. Mott, a son of the 
distinguished surgeon, Valentine Mott, of New York. Blaque Bey, a 
former Turkish Minister at Washington, married a siBter of the General, 
and through his influence Mott was at one time a great power at the 
court of the Khedive, but, after a visit to this country, he made his home 
at Constantinople. The disgraceful row of Consul General George H. 
Butler, the nephew of his " Uncle Ben," created a strong feeling in Cairo 
against the Americans, and by degrees the so-called American colony be- 
came decimated, most of the Confederate officers returning home, leaving 
Stone as the only American representative in the Khedive's army, where 
he has been for many years the Chief of Staff. Years ago Stone resigned 
from the U. S. Army and established a bank in this city, its place of 
business being nearly opposite that of Lucas Turner & Co., where General 
Sherman was the manager. A theft by one of his clerks of some sixty 
thousand dollars forced him to close his doors. During the civil war he 
was in command at the battle of Ball's Bluff, where Senator Ned Baker 
was killed. For some reason Secretary Stanton conceived that Stone's 
sympathies were with the Confederates, and he was arrested, placed in 
prison, and subsequently went through the form of a trial. After bis 
discharge he left this country with his family for Egypt. 



THE NEW BANK COMMISSIONER. 

The appointment of Colonel J. M. Litchfield to the position of Bank 
Commissioner is in every respect an admirable one, and reflects the high- 
est credit on the selective talent of the Governor. A better choice could 
not have been made. Colonel Litchfield is in every way exceptionally 
well qualified for this most important position. He is an honorable gen- 
tleman of unquestionable integrity, who can safely be entrusted with 
grave responsibilities, such as necessarily attach to the post of Bank 
Commissioner. As a business man, he is known to be one of the shrewd- 
est and most enterprising in our midst. He has conducted extensive busi- 
ness operations in this city for some decades, and, in his commercial pur- 
suits, has necessarily acquired a large experience in those financial mat- 
ters which this position will make it his business to investigate. He is a 
man of strong independence of character, and bank managers will not be 
able either to flatter or frighten him into making favorable reports when 
the facts do not warrant them, or glossing over circumstances that indi- 
cate, if they do not demonstrate, crookedness. 

In politics, Col. Litchfield is an avowed believer in Republican princi- 
ples, but he is not a bigoted enthusiast. He has the ability to think for 
himself, and the courage of his convictions; consequently he will not lend 
himself to the perpetration of wrong, even thougn it be perpetrated in 
the name of the Republican party. Colonel Litchfield served this muni- 
cipality in the capacity of Supervisor for two years, and during his term 
he made a record which is honorable to himself and satisfactory to those 
whom he served. 

ROBESON'S DEFENSE. 
The recent attack by ex-Secretary of the Navy Robeson upon the 
private character of the Member of Congress who was instrumental in 
unearthing the frauds which marked the administration of the Navy De- 
partment during the Robeson regime, was blackguardly in the abstract, 
and more than blackguardly when viewed in connection with the history 
of the case. It is like an attempt on the part of a thief to escape con- 
demnation on the ground that the person who caught him running away 
with the stolen property had, at one period of his fife, been seen entering 
a house of ill-fame. It matters not what the character of the Chairman 
of the Committee which investigated and brought to light Robeson's mal- 
feasance may be. As a matter of fact, there are strong grounds for be- 
lieving that Robeson's inuendoes were lies cut out of whole cloth; but 
even assuming them to be perfectly true, they are not of any particular 
public interest, and they do not alter or explain the fact that, under 
Robeson's administration of the Navy Department, millions of dollars of 
the public money were wasted in a way that can only be designated 
stealing, and our navy was allowed to go to the dogs. If Robeson wants 
to defend himself, let him explain what became of the navy during his 
incumbency of the Secretary's office; also, what became of the large sums 
of money which were appropriated for its maintenance. 



July 15, 1882. 



CALIFORNIA ADVERTISER. 



11 



THE TOWN CRIER. 

*Haar tha Ortar.'" "Whit tha da»il an thoo T" 
* On* that will play tha davil. air with yon." 

' lU'd a attnc n his uit aa lon« at a tlail. 
Which mad a him urow bolder and bolder." 



Daring a lengthy social intercourse with the fair sex of a tender age, 
in our youthful days, it was our lot on many occasions to have thrust be- 
fore us a certain instrument of brain torture which intellectual young 
ladies delight in wielding, to the discomfiture of their unsuspecting male 
friend.-* tit-wit, a mental photograph album — coupled with the request 
that we forthwith lake pen in hand and fill up one of the pages thereof 
with nur preferences and opinions, in the shape of answers to about the 
sillient set of printed questions the mind of man ever concocted. It has 
ever been a distasteful matter to us to give ourselves away in any manner, 
but gallantry, our distinguishing characteristic, always on these occasions 
got the better of our discretion, and we proceeded to tell our pet authors, 
painters, poetesses, and characters in history, with a dash that showed we 
knew all about it, and had in fact been lying awake the night before 
making up our mind. There was one question, however, which always 
got us, and that was: "What do you consider the hight of human hap- 
piness?" We never could fill up that blank. We wish one of those 
young ladies would put their book before us now, for now we can. One 
day last week we were standing in the Post Office, waiting for our over- 
land mail to be distributed, when a lady of quiet demeanor and uncertain 
age dashed through the line at the stamp window, and, with a swoop, 
stooped and grabbed something from the floor. As she rose and departed, 
clutching her treasure to her breast, we shall never forget the calm 
look of intensified delight depicted on her countenance. We inquired 
the cause. A friend near by informed us. She was a stamp collector, 
and had found an envelope with a three-cornered Cape of Good Hope 
stamp. 

Being naturally of an engineering turn of mind, our mental stamina 
has been sorely exercised of late over a problem, the unraveling of which 
might well have taxed the powers of greater craniums than ours, should 
such exist, which we doubt. We have been trying to find out the exact 
number of ladies' sealskin coats there are in the city. How many days 
and nights of ceaseless labor our investigations entailed we will not state, 
fearing that people might deem us prone to exaggerate. Nor need we 
dwell on intermediate statistics, culled from averaging Kearny street and the 
matinees every Saturday for four consecutive weeks. We will simply an- 
nounce the result, and confess at the same time to a deep regret that we 
ever tried to find the thing out at all, for we have been left with a heart 
oppressed with pain and a mind convinced of the axiom: "Where ignor- 
ance is bliss," etc. According to the last Census, there were in this city 
and county just 64,483 females, while our investigations show that there 
are but 37,291 seal-skin coats. Can it be believed ? Reflect — calmly re- 
flect for one single moment: Nearly one-half of our female population are 
without sealskin coats. Could anything be more dreadful ? Frequenters 
of our streets and places of public resort will scarce credit it, but 'tis 
even so. Cannot something be done to alleviate this deplorable state of 
things? Can fathers, husbands, sons and brothers stand idly by and let 
this slur rest on our city? Must nearly one-half of our women be debar- 
red from the sunlight of Kearny street, the excitement of shopping, the 
amusement of the theatre? Will not some noble-hearted philanthropist 
start a fund to supply the want? Refuse women a vote, if you will, but 
let her have her sealskin coat. 

It is our harmless habit, when walking about among the residential 

Suarters of the city, to cast our eyes upwards into second atory windows, 
f course we have no other object than to discover the size of the win- 
dow-panes, and ascertain the quality of the lace curtains draping the 
same. Why, the idea! What else should we want to see? Our fifty 
odd years of bachelorhood are proof against all that sort of thing, my 
friend. The time was, perhaps — but there. Well, for some months 
past we have been struck by the number of young women with band- 
aged heads which those windows contained. Was there a suddeu epi- 
demic of pronounced sick headache among the female persuasion, or had 
their beaux taken them all out buggy riding to the Park at once, 
and ended their happiness by a runaway and smash-up, or what was 
it? We couldn't make it out at atL At last, and only yesterday, it 
was we found out. We met a young lady friend on Market street, 
whom the day before we had seen bandaged at her window. "Hope 
you're better," we remarked. "Better!" Bhe exclaimed. "Better o' 
what?" " Why," we stammered, "I saw your head tied up yesterday 
when I passed, and—" "Oh, you thought I was sick, did you ? Why, 
no ; that's the. way we girls keep our Montagues down till they stick. 
I aint sick." 

An Associated Press telegram apprises the American People of the 
important fact that Madame Exilda La Chapelle's "Championship Ladies' 
Pedestrienne Belt " is displayed for sale in the window of a Chicago pawn- 
shop. Such is the value set upon glory in these degenerate days, and 
such is the result of awarding prizes which have any marketable value. 
The ancient Romans had an eye to this sort of thing when they gave 
the military or athlete or artistic victor merely a wreath of laurel. He 
couldn't very well put that up the spout, but hung it up on a nail in 
the best parlor. It probably had as much of the sanctity of well-won 
honor about it as the gold-headed canes and plated cup and bullion-laden 
belts which form the prizes of modern days. Give a hero a gold medal 
and he is likely to be minus his decoration the first time he is hard up, 
but pin upon his breast the bronze medal of the Victoria Cross, made 
from the metal of guns captured from the enemy, and he will treasure 
the emblem— because the pawnbroker doesn't want it. 

People who have been for a trip to Paris, and who consequently never 
after seem to be able to control their desire to wedge French into their 
remarks, don't one quarter of them know the meaning of half the expres- 
sions they have picked up and interminably use. We should like, for in- 
stance, one of them to explain what they mean when they saythat a lady 
is " Commc il faut aufond." 

Aa a reference, Punch's advice to those about to marry, viz. : "Don't," 
has grown painfully stale. Can't somebody give us something fresh to 
refer to ? A pamphlet from Dr. Czapkay, for instance, wouldn't be in- 
appropriate. 



The wise young man marries hit boarding. minsus. In her dwelleth 
perennial shelter and a security of meaK Though she may be forty, and 
not at all fair, so long as Bhe nossesseth a good run of paying boarderi 
she is a jewel of great price. These reflections are suggested to the T. C. 
by the fact that, of all women who want husbands in tint good city of 
ours, there are none who have •«> large a selection to c hoove from as the 
boarding -missus. And, heaven ble^t them! they don't mind if they run 
up a score on this line, ami wed a fourth «>r h fifth with the same ease and 
nonchalance with which the first was brought down. And if the wise 
youth fails in getting a paying actress -and ther-.- are not many in the 
market now, though Lotta and Mary Anderson are yet unmarried— he 
should fly atthe boarding- m issu s ; though, indeed, the experienced head 
of a milliner's shop iu a good locality is not to be despised by the philoso- 
pher who believes in the equality of the sexes to the extent of allowing 
his wife to furnish the fuel for the domestic pot. 

There was nearly a row a day or two ago in the Mercantile Library 
reading-rooms, the participants being the phlegmy cough fiend and the 
little rosy-cheeked man with the wig. The question at issue was one of 
prior possession, and the Bubject Frank Leslie's Budget of Fun. Both 
parties claimed to have exclusive and uninterrupted possession of it since 
a week ago last Monday, and things began to look as if a bombardment 
was in order. But just as the cough fiend had cleared his throat pre- 
paratory to opening fire, the moustache-stroking young fellow with the 
arched eyebrows and somnolent Btare crawled from under the desk and 
filed an intervention. He said he had had the periodical without inter- 
mission since Washington's Birthday, and had only absented himself for 
five minutes to take his mid-day dose of soothing syrup; in proof of which 
he abstracted from between the leaves the cork of the bottle, which bore 
the date of February 22, 1882. 

The unfortunate Baronet who is quarantined on board the Belgic 
is visited daily by some one or other of the reporters of the city press, 
who hand him a copy of their journal with a request to read it through. 
And this because some idle fellow started a rumor that Sir William Eden 
had conceived the idea of publishing a newspaper in San Francisco, by 
way of getting rid of his spare cash. Therefore those young men are 
anxious at the same time to direct him to the best models, and recom- 
mend themselves for the editorial stool. But the Baronet has sworn that 
the next reporter-laden boat that comes alongside the Belgic will be 
swamped by receiving one of his shoes just amidships. And the British 
tourist shoe, dropped with good aim, would go plum through an iron- 
bottomed barge. 

Those "airy, fairy Lillians,'' who go skimming along Kearny street 
Saturday afternoons, with heads erect and dark eyes beautifully rolling, 
should remember that a very bad case of scamp may often be enclosed in 
a very good suit of clothes. For, by the Charlie Dean's, the T. C. saw, 
not long ago, the daughter of a respectable house nod and smile at a ruf- 
fian, whose credentials for the State Prison are now almost completed by 
the Chief of Police. She did not mean to do wrong — it was only a trifle 
of coquetry, but, if those girls must flirt, let them smirk on the shop- 
man, who is legitimate game, and not shoot their arrows at the mixed 
riff-raff of the streets. Because it is horribly dangerous, and scares off 
eligible parties, as the bark of the bulldog speeds the timorous tabby. 

It is really wonderful how much the editors of our dailies know 
about Egypt. All through this difficulty they have been lavish and im- 
partial with their counsel to Arabi Pasha, Admiral Seymour, Gladstone 
and the Porte. But it was not until the bombardment took place that 
they came out with all their strength. They knew the whole business 
then, and grew particularly severe upon the practices of some of the Brit- 
ish ships. Bartlett Pasha, of the Bulletin, was the most implacable critic 
of the lot, and, had he been in Fort Mex, things would have gone hard 
with the squadron. However, as he did not find time to leave the Bulletin 
editorial rooms for the Mediterranean, the fleet is yet safe, and Admiral 
Seymour has met the approval of his Government. 

May the devil fly away with the fog! Nfeht and morning it is with 
us on this bleak and villainous peninsula. It creeps in the windows, sta- 
tions itself at the back-door, dodges through at every chance, and lays it- 
self to rest in the marrow of our bones. It has one great extenuating 
trait, and that is, it gives the lie to those mouthing eulogists who would 
have us pray every hour a thankful prayer for possessing such a delight- 
ful climate. And when the guileless tourist, who has heard about our 
blue Italian skies, comes this way, the fog leavens his soul. After he has 
swallowed a few gallons of its murkiness, the light of reason dawns upon 
him, and he goes away confessing that among the liars of this world we 
have no peers. 

It appears that Guiteau's skeleton, having been picked clean by the 
doctors, is to grin and chatter above the injured section of Garfield's 
vertebra in the United States Medical Museum at Washington. Can a 
morbid lust for the horrible be carried to a more disgusting extremity 
than this? We are told that in the same case which contains these un- 
savory relics are also the skull of Lincoln, several bones from the body 
of Wilkes Booth, and the skull of Wirtz, the Andersonville prison- 
keeper. Surely it is a weird and ghastly idea, this mixing up of the re- 
mains of murderers and their victims. Such an abominable and unnatural 
custom could obtain in no country that was not peopled by a nation of 
Barnums. 

The lop-sided gait of fashionable young men nowadays is due to the 
immense size and weight of their fob-chains. Among our yachting men (?) 
it is known as "a list to port," and is called the Escambia. 

With more truth than poetry one of our local medical cure-alls be- 
gins his advertisement : " I offer my valuable services to all who are so 
unfortunate as to require them." 

There are some people so ignorant of English ways and customs 
that they think that Knights of the Bath and Privy Councillors are a 
high-toned order of plumbers. 

Since the scientific maceration of the body of the defunct Guiteau no 
patron of a Washington City " three-f or-two " restaurant has had the 
temerity to order soup. 

Since the "Chronicle" people got "Gath" to contribute, they have 
had such a run on the capital I's as never was known in the history of 
the paper. 



12 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER AND 



July 15, 1882 



SUNBEAMS. 



My country 'tis from thee 
I long to get a fee, 

Of that I sing. 
Place me where Congress meets, 
Where I can fmd the sweets, 
Or in some ring. 

A smart peddler called a few days since at a 
roadside dwelling and asked if he could see the 
lady of the house. "Well, yes you can, if you 
ain't blind," snapped the woman who had an- 
swed his knock. "Oh, beg pardon, madam! 
You, then, are the lady of the house ? '* Yes, I 
am. What else should I be? Did you think I 
was the gentleman or the cat or turf -bin?" "I 
did not know, madam, but you might be the 
youngest daughter." " Ob, well, that was nat- 
ural, replied the lady; "what have you got to 
show, sir?" The shrewd peddler displayed his 
wares, aud when he left the door step half an 
hour later, the lady had fourteen yards of ribbon, 
a score or so of artificial flowers and a new shawl ; 
and in the peddler's pocket was twice the value 
of the articles just named. 

" Why, Milly, darling, are yon cold ?" ■' No," 
she said, with a light laugh ; " I t Qink it a g° ose 
must have been walkingovermygrave." " Happy 
goose !" he replied, with some vague idea that he 
was not only paying a compliment, but making 
an epigram. 

When Mrs. Homespun heard of the recent 
assassination in Ireland, and that it was attrib- 
uted to the Irish, she exclaimed: " Massy sakes! 
You don't tell methe Irish have got into Ireland? 
Well, well. I believe they're everywhere!"' 

"Don had many advantages," said old Simon 
Cameron, talking of his son the other day, " but 
I had oie that is worth more to any man start- 
ing in life than all he ever had." " What is 
that, General !" ' ' The advantage of starting poor. 

A New Orleans man has had bis wife arrest 
ed for spanking him. He says he doesn't wish 
to remain a boy all his life, aud be treated as if 
he had been in swimming against orders. 




BROAD GAUGE. 

SUMMER ARRANGEMENT. 

Commencing Monday. April 10, 1882, 

And until further notice, Passenger Trains will leave 
from, and arrive at San Francisco Passenger Depot 
(Townsend St., between 3d and 4thstreets,) as follows: 



AVE I 
.P. f 



DESTINATION. 



8:30 a.m. 
t 9:30 A M. 
10:40 a.m. 

* 3:30 p.u. 
4:25 p.m. 

* 5:15 P.M. 
6:30 P.M. 


f N , 

! ...San Mateo, Redwood,... . 
and Menlo Park .. | 


6:40 a.m. 

* 8:10 a.m. 
9.03 A.M. 

*10:02 am. 

* 3:36 P.M. 
t 4:59 r.M. 

6:00 P.M. 
t 8:15 P.M. 


8:30 A.M 

10:40 a.m. 

* 3:30 P.M. 

4:25 P.M. 


f \ 

I ..SantaClara,San Joseand.. ^ 
"j ..Principal Way Stations... | 


9:03 a.m. 

* 10:02 a.m. 

* 3:36 P.M. 
6:00 p.m. 

+ 8:15 p.m. 



10:40 
• 3:30 



JSH 



Gilroy, Paj;iro, Castroville 



. and Salinas.. 



TH; 



02 A M. 
00 P.M. 



10:40 t 
* 3:30 I 



.Hollisterand Tres Pinos.. J-j 6 . 



02 a.m. 

.00 P.M. 



10:40 A 
* 3.30 I 



{. .Monterey, Watsonville . 1 u.q, 
Camp Goodall, Aptos, Camp V g ; 
San Joae,Soquel,Santa Cruz, j I 



02 A.M. 
OOP M. 



10:40 a.m. . . .Soledad and Way Stations . 
♦Sundays excepted, t Sundays only. 



2^ Special Notice. *S& 

Sunday Excursion Trains to Monterkv and Santa 
Cruz.— First-class Excursion Train to Monterey and 
Santa Cruz will leave San Francisco every Sunday at 
7:30 a.m. Returning, leave Monterey at 4:35 p.m.; San- 
ta Cruz at 4:15 p.m., arriving San Francisco at 8:40 p.m. 
Fare for the Round Trip to either point. $3. 



Stage connections are made with the 10:40 a.m. 
Train, except Pescadero Stages via San Mateo, which 
connect with 8:30 A.M. Train. 



Ticket Opticus— Passenger Depot, Townsend street, 
and No. 2 New Montgomery street, Palace Hotel. 
A. C. BASSETT, H. R. JUDAH, 

Superintendent Asst. Pass. & Tkt. Agt. 

fW~ S. P. Atlantic Express Train via Los Angeles, 
Yuina, etc., leaves San Francisco daily via Oakland 
Ferry, foot of Market street, at 9:30 a.m. 



C. P. R - R. 

Time Schedule, Monday, May 15, 1882, 

Trains leave, and are due to arrive at, 

San Francisco as follows: 



LEAVE 

(for) 


\ DESTINATION. 


ARRIVE 
(from) 


9:30 a.m. 
♦4:00 p.m. 
•4:30 p.m. 

8:00a.M. 


. ...Antioch and Martinez 


2:i<J P.M. 
*12:40p.m. 
♦10:10 a.m. 

7:40 p.m. 
11:40 a.m. 
•10:10 A.M. 
*10:10 a.m. 

7:40 p.m. 

2:40 p.m. 

7:10 A.m. 

5:40 p.m. 
•12:40 p.m. 

5:40 P.M. 
•nO.lOA-M. 
111:40 A.M. 

2:40 p.m. 

5:40 p.m. 

8:40a.M. 

2:40 p.m. 
•12:40 p.m. 

5:40 p.m. 

5:40 p.m. 

4:10 P.M. 

9:40 a.m. 

8:40 a.m 
11:40 A.M. 

6:10 a.m. 

5:40 P.M. 

6:40 P.M. 

7:40 P.M. 

11:40 a.m. 

•10:10 a.m. 

•6:00 a.m. 

4:10 p.m. 

9:40 a.m. 

7:40 P.M 

2:40 p.m. 
Jll:40 A.M. 
•12.40 P.M. 
•10:10 A.M. 
11:40 A.M. 
•7:40 p.m. 
-•■10:10 a.m. 
•7:40 p.m. 


-■'4:30 p.m. 




*4:00 P.M. 

9:30 a.m. 

4:30 P.M. 

8:00 a.m 
*4 :00 p.m. 


.. 1 Deniing, El Paso \ Express.... 

. . | Gait aud 1 via Livermore 

. . 1 Stockton | via Martinez 






JS:00 a.m. 
9:30 a.m. 
8:00 a.m. 
5:00 p.m. 


...*. *' " {JSundays only) 

....Los Angeles and South 

.. . Livermore and Pleasanton. . . 


♦4:00 p.m. 




8:00 a.m. 
10:00 A.M. 
3:00 P.m. 
5:00 p.m. 


....Nitesand Haywards 


5:30 p.m. 

8:00 A.M. 

8:00 a.m. 

8:00 a.m. 

3:30 P.M. 
•4:30 p.m. 
*4:00 P.M. 


.. j" Sacramento, i via Livermore. 
. . < Colfax and Y via Beuicia. . . . 

. . ( Alta J via Benicia .... 

Sacramento, via Benicia. . . . 














3:30 p.m. 
♦4:00 p.m. 
-■■4:30 p.m. 








*4:30 P.M. 
*S:00 a.m. 


Willows and Williams 


Train let 
Pacific Ex 
Express fi 


vine San Francisco at 9:30 A.M. s 
press from " Ogden " at San Pablo : 
om "El Paso" at Antiooh. 


lould meet 
also Pacific 


LOCAL FERRY TRAINS, 

Via Oakland Pier. 


Froi 


ii "SAN FRANCISCO." I 


•ally. 



To EAST OAKLAND-'6.00, '6:30. 7:30, 8:30, 9:30 

10:30, 11:30, 12.30, 1.30, 2:30, 3:30, 4:30, 5:30, 6:30, 

7:00, 8:00, 9:30, 11:00, »12:00. 
To ALAMEDA— •6:00, -tt):30, 7:00, »t7:30, 8:00, -t8:30, 

9:00, 't9:30, 10:00, 11:00, 12:00, 1:00, 2:00, 3:00. <'t3:30, 

4:00, «t4:30, 5:00, '-t5:30, 6:00, *t<>:30, 7:00, »8:00, 9:30, 

11:00, »12:00. 
To BERKELEY - "6:00, »6:30, 7:00, "7:30, 8:00, «8:30, 

9:00, 19:30, 10:00, J10:30, 11:00, {11:30, 12:00, 1:00, 

2:00, 3:00, 4:00, 4:30, 5:00, 5:30, 6:00, 6:30, 7:00, 8:00, 

9:30, »1!:00. 
To WEST BERKELEY— '6:00, «6:30, 7:00, °7:30, (8:00> 

•8:30, 9:00, 10:00, 11:00, 2:00, 3:00, 4:00, "4:30, 5:00. 

•5:30, 0:00. "0:30, 7:00. 



To "8AST FRANCISCO," Dally. 



From BROADWAY, Oaklaxd -»5:32, *6:02, 6:32, 7:02, 

7:32,8:02,8:32, 9:02, 9:32, 10:02, 10:32, 11:02, 11:32, 12:02, 

12:32, 1:02, 1:32, 2:02, 2:32, 3:02, 3:32, 4:02, 4:32, 5:02, 

5:32, 6:02, 6:32, 7:02, 8:02, 9:32, 11:02. 
From EAST OAKLAND -*5:21, »5:51, 6:21,6:51,7:51, 

8:5l, 9:51, 10:51, 11:51, 12:51, 1:51, 2:51, 3:51, 4:51, 

5:51, 6:51, 7:51, 9:21, 10:51 
From ALAMEDA— «5:15, '5:45, 6:15, 7:10, "t7:35, 8:10, 

"+8:35, 9:10, *t9:35, 10:10, *tl0:35, 11:10, 12:10, 1.10, 

2:10, 3:10, 4:10, <t4:35, 5:10, <t5:35, 6:10, *t6:35, 7:15, 

*t7:35, 9:15, 10:45. 
From BERKELEY— *5:45, *6:15, 6:45, "7:15,7:45, «8:15, 

8:46, {9:15, 9:45, {10:15, 10:45, {11:15, 11:45, 12:45, 

1:45, 2:45, 3:45, 4:15, 4:45,5:15,5:45,6:15,6:45, 7:45, 

9:15, "10:45. 
From WEST BERKELEY — »5:45, *6:15, 6:45, «7:15, 

7:45, 8:45, 9:45, 10:45, 1:45, 2:45, 3:45, 4:45, «5:15, 5:45, 

•6:15, 6:45, *7:15. 



Creek Route, 

From SAN FRANCISCO— »7:15, 9:15, 11:15, 1:15, 3:15. 

5:15. 
From OAKLAND— »6:15, 8:15, 10:15, 12:15, 2:15, 4:15. 



All trains ran daily, except when star (•) denotes Son- 
days excepted. 

tTrains marked thus (t) run via East Oakland. 
Cf)Sundays only. 




On and arter Monday. April 3d, 1882, 
Boats and Trains will leave San Francisco as 
follows: 



7 "I f\ A.M. daily (Sundays excepted), via San Rafael, 
' * -1 *-* from Market-street wharf, for Petaluma, San- 
ta Rosa, Healdsburg, Cloverdale, Guemeville and way 
stations. Stages connect at Geyserville for Skaggs' 
Springs ; and at Cloverdale for Highland Springs, Kel- 
seyville, Soda Bay, Lakeport, TJkiah and Geysers. 



" Standard Time" furnished by Randolph & Co., Jew- 
elers, 101 and 103 Montgomery St., S. F. 

T. H. GOODMAN, Gen. Pass, and Ticket Agt. 
A. N. Towse, Generai Manager. 



Dally, Except Sundays. 

2 9A r.M., via Donahue, from Washington-street 
•0\J wharf. 

4^A r.M., via San Rafael, fromMarket-street wharf, 
•<-JU for Petaluma, Cloverdale and way stations. 
Stages for Navarro Ridge and Mendocino City leave 
Cloverdale daily at 6 A.M. 



Sunday Excursions. 

8 0A A.M., Sundays ooly, via Donahue, from Wash- 
•^" ingtou-street wharf, for Cloverdale and way 
stations. Round Trip Tickets on Sundays to Petaluma, 
81.50 : Santa Rosa, $2 ; Healdsburg, $3 ; Cloverdale, 
84.50; Guemeville, S3. Retumiug, will arrive in San 
Francisco at 6:45 P.M. 



ket-street wharf, for Miller's, Pacheco, Novato 
and Burdell's. Returning, will arrive in San Francisco 
at 7:45 P.M. 



GEYSERS! GEYSERS! 

The Greatest Natural Wonder of the 

World ! 



Immense Reduction in Hates. 

Hound Trip Tickets, via Cloverdale S8 50 

Round Trip Tickets, via Cloverdale and Calistojra.S12 50 



Passengers will leave San Francisco at 7:10 A.M. 
week days, from San Quentin Ferry, and arrive at the 
Geysers at 2:30 P.M. On Sundays, leave Washington- 
street Wharf, by Steamer JAMES M. DONAHUE, at 
8:20 AM. Returning, arrive in San Francisco by either 
route the following evening. 



ARTHUR HUGHES, 
Gen. Manager. 



PETER J. McGLYNN, 
Gen. Pass. & Tkt. Agt. 



SONOMA VALLEY RAILROAD. 

On aud after Monday, April 3d, 1882, 
Boats and Trains will leave San Francisco as 
follows: 

O Qf\ p. m. daily (Sundays excepted), from Washing- 
^•*J" ton-street Wharf, for the town of Sonoma. 
Fare, $1. Round Trip Tickets, from Saturday till Mon- 
day, tfl 50. 

SUNDAY EXCURSIONS. 

8 0A a.m. (Sundays only), from Washington-street 
.£i\J wharf, for the town of Sonoma. Round Trip 
Tickets, SI. 



ARTHUR HUGHES, 
Gen. Manager. 



PETER J. McGLYNN", 
Gen. Pass. & Tkt. Agt. 



L.H.Newton. M. Newton. 

NEWTON BROTHERS & CO., 

Importers and Wholesale Dealers in 
Teas, Foreign Goods and Groceries, 204 and 206 
California street, San Francisco, Cal May 26. 



H. 3. Williams. A. Ohesebrongh. 

W.H.Dimond. 

WILLIAMS, DIMOND & CO., 

Snipping and Commission Merchants, 

UNION BUILDING. 

Junction Market and Fine Streets. 

AGENTS FOR 

Pacific Kail Steamship Company, Pacific 
Steam Navigation Company, The Ca- 
nard Royal Mail Steamship Company , 
1 ' The California Line of Clippers ' * 
from New York and Boston, 
and * ' The Haw a i i an Line . * ' 
San Francisco, January 31, 1880. [Jan. 31. 



"What lunatic asylum is that?" asked a 
stranger in Philadelphia, pointing to a building 
from which the moBt horrible sounds were issu- 
ing. " Why, my dear sir," was the reply, " that 
is not a lunatic asylum. That is a female semi- 
nary ; this is the music practice hour." 

"Lost, a blue sapphire gentleman's scarf -pin, 
etc." School ma'am, meditatively— " What a 
jewel of a man he must be J" 



July 15, 1W% 



CALIFORNIA ADVEKTISKK. 



13 



THE LOVE OF THE PAST. 

A* tailor* watch from their prison 

r\>r the lonjj j^ay line oj the coasU, 

I look to the past re- Arisen, 

Ainl joys come over in hosts 

Kike the white sea-btni* from their roost*. 

I love not the indelicate present. 

The future's unknown to our quest. 
To-day is the life of the peasant. 

But the past is a haven of rest — 

The joy of the past is the best. 

The rose of the past is better 

Than the rose we ravish to-day ; 
Tis holier, purer and fitter 

To place on the shrine where we pray — 

Kur the secret thoughts we obey. 

There, are no deceptions nor changes, 

There, all is placid and still ; 
No grief, nor fate that estranges, 

Nor hope that no life can fulfill, 

But ethereal shelter from ill. 

The coarser delights of the hour 

Tempt, and debauch and deprave ; 

And we joy in a poisonous flower, 

Knowing that nothing can save 
Our flesh from the fate of the grave. 

But surely we leave them, returning, 
In grief to the well-loved nest, 

Filled with an infinite yearning, 

Knowing the past to be rest — 

That the things of the past are the best. 

— Spectators. 

L AMI DE LA MAISON. 

Of all the blots, among the many that bedim and tarnish the purity 
of married life in society, none is so disgusting in all its ingredients as 
the man who occupies in a family the position named above. The noi- 
some creature makes his appearance generally from two to four years 
after marriage. He may be either a new "mash," or an old and long- 
secreted flame of the wife. He is either a bachelor, a widower or a 
divorcee. Though he possesses no wife of his own, he affects happiness 
in the society of another man's. He is usually middle-aged. There is no 
gradual acquisition of his position. His appearance made, his status is 
assured, and he at once becomes, and seems likely forever to continue, as 
much an article of household furniture as the kitchen table or the front- 
door mat. Call when you will, he is there. Let you dine at the house, 
he is an inevitable guest. Be the husband delayed at his office, in the 
country on business, gone to the lodge or attending a meeting of the 
club, he never absents himself; his face will you see at the window 
should you pass. At theatre, concert, opera or ball, he is the wife's con- 
stant attendant and obedient poodle-dog. His arm is always on hand to 
release her partners when her dances are over; he takes her to supper and 
puts her into her carriage. He is ostensibly a warm personal friend of 
the husband's. They call each other Fred, Harry, George or Frank, and 
mutually appear devoted. 

When the husband takes his wife anywhere, he accompanies or meets 
them. He brings the children bonbons and hobby horses on New Year's, 
and sends them fire-crackers on the Fourth of July. Nothing occurs in 
the home that he is not cognizant of, is not consulted about, from the 

?ainting of the kitchen floor to the engagement of a family physician. 
n short, as the friend of the wife, he combines the qualities of brother 
and husband. But, to this extent and qualification, he is more than a 
brother and less than a husband — more than a brother, in that he is her 
devoted slave ; less than her husband, in that he sleeps out of the house. 
In the eyes of all but his whose happiness is most at stake, the presence 
in the house of this creature, and his intimacy with the wife, is fraught 
with untold danger; the innocence of the domestic fireside threatened, the 
sacredness of the marital relation invaded. His existence is a slur upon 
the wife, a reproach to the husband. If married men, who either indif- 
ferently permit or carelessly encourage these parasites at their hearth- 
stones, could but hear the things that are more than whispered about 
them and their wives, and be brought to realize the unspoken estimation 
in which they are held by all proper-minded and decently conducted men 
and women, they would awake to a consciousness of the despicableness of 
the position they occupy in the minds of the community. Let them be 
men, and as men, determining that a wife needs no "friend" but her hus- 
band, act accordingly. 

American Metallurgy.— Mr. Swank estimates the production of pig 
iron in the whole of the United States for 1881 at 5,000,000 net tons, or 
4,500,000 gross tons. In 1880 the production amounted to 4,295,414 net 
tons, or 3,831,191 gross tons. The production of iron and steel rails is 
never so much a matter of speculation as that of pig iron. The produc- 
tion of both kinds of rails in 1881 was probably 1,900,000 net tons, or 1, 
700,000 gross tons. The production of 1880 was 1,441,837 net tons, or 
1,305,212 gross tons, of which 440,960 gross tons were iron rails, and 864,- 
252 gross tons were steel rails. The estimated production of 1,700,000 
gross tons in 1881 may be divided into 1,200,000 gross tons of steel rails 
amd 500,000 gross tons of iron rails. 



Railway Over the Channel. — M. Gr^vy, the President of the French 
Republic, has been interviewed by M. Verard de 1' Anne, the promoter 
of the bridge over the Channel. He acknowledged that a bridge was the 
only possible means to develop the French commerce, by joining directly 
the French and English railways. Several Ministers have promised M. 
de 1' Anne that they would profit by the Parliamentary holidays to push 
on the examination of that question. 

Take the Autophone to the country. Ichi Ban, sole agent, has all 
the latest airs. 



COAL AND WOOD, 

Wholesale and Retail, 

At the Old Number 209 Sansome Street. 

GEORGE H. HUNT & CO. 

or Any Artic'e In the Line Supplied. -«a 
M»roh i. Telephone .Vo. 831. 

ROEDERER CHAMPACNE! 



NOTICE. 
Tbe Trade and (be Public are In formed that we Receive tbe 

GENUINE 

LOUIS ROEDERER CARTE BLANCHE CHAMPAGNE, 

Direct from lax. Louis Roederer, Reims, 
Over his Signature and Consular Invoice. 



CST" Each case is marked upon the side, ' * Macondray & Co . , San Fran- 
cisco," and each bottle bears the label, " Macondray & Co., Sole Agents 
for the Pacific Coast^ 

MACONDRAY & CO., 

Sole Agents for the Pacific Coast, 

[September 24.] 



M. A. GUNST & CO., 

203 Kearny Street San Franoisoo. 

IMPORTERS AND DEALERS IN 

HAVANA AND KEY WEST CIGARS, 

Also, Agents for Kimball, Gaulliener & Go's Guatemala Cigars. 
t3P~ Inform tlie Public that they receive large invoices of Choice 
Havana Brands twice a month. [Feb. 19. 

C. ADOLPHE LOW & CO., 

Commission Merchants, 

SAN FRANCISCO and NEW TORE. 

fi^T" Agents of American Sugar Refinery, corner of Union and Battery streets, 
San Francisco, California. Jan. 17. 

Olaus Spreckels. "Wm. G. Irwin. 

F WM. G. IRWIN & CO., 

Sugar Factors and Commission Agents, 

Honolulu, H. I. rMarch 25. 

j7D. SPRECKELS & BROS., 

Shippin and Commission Merohants. 

Hau/aiian Zrtne of Paclceta. 

326 Market Street San Francisco. 

May 28 . 

CALIFORNIA. SUGAR REFINERY, 

Manufacturers of the Standard Syrup, a superior article 
put up in barrela expressly for home consumption. AJso. Extra Heavy Syrup 
in barrels for Export. Refined Sugars at lowest market rates. Office 325 Market 
street, up stairs. Dec. 21. 

J. W. Sheehy. J. 0. O'Connor. 

y O'CONNOR & SHEEHY, 

Undertakers* 

Removed to 767 M issjon street, between Third and Fonrtb. 
Every requisite for Funerals furnished at the Lowest Rates and in the Best 
Manner. April 29. 

GEORGE C. HICKOX & CO., 

STOCK BROKERS. 

No. 314 Pine Street San Francisco. 

[May 20.] 

ALASKA COMMERCIAL COMPANY, 

No. 310 Sansome Street, 

San Francisco, 

WHOLESALE DEALERS IN FTTR8. 

[September 21.1 

JOSEPH GILLOTT'S STEEL PENS. 

Gold Medal, Paris, 187S. 

Sold by all Stationers. Sole Agent for tbe United States: 
MK. HENRY HOE, 91 John street, N. Y. Jan. 5. 

C. W. M. SMITH, /$&Sk 

The Leading and Oldest Patent Solicitor, /n)S9f«M 

Established in. 1862, \TKWW 

Removed to 22-1 Sansome Street.X&M^7 

635" MR. C. W. M. SMITH is the patent attorney for Marriott's Abroplahk Com- 
pany for Navigating the Air. Q ct - 22. 

TABER, HARKER & CO., 

I3TP0BXEMS AJfl> WHOLESALE 0BOCESS, 
108 and 110 California St., S. F. 

r April 19.] 



14 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER AND 



July 15, 1882 



LOCAL NOTES. 
The League of Deliverance places a man in front of a Market-street 
shoe store to warn people that that store sold Chinese-made shoes. As 
the Leaguers all wear that brand of foot- covering, they should know 
where it is sold.— —Steamship Carnamuir whitewashed, fumigated and 
allowed to dock. The builders of the dock were whitewashed long ago. 
Man from Solano jumps from a third-story window to the sidewalk. 
Man badly hurt — sidewalk all right.— —The Chinese Order of Free Mason 
applies to the Courts for protection from some other Chinamen who are 
making too free with the name of their society. ^—Female person named 
Ida Smith makes an eighth attempt, with the aid of poison, to visit 
heaven without a properly authenticated invitation card. Admission re- 
fused.-^— Tbe Mayor vetoes a street-railroad franchise. Level-headed 
old horse. ^—School Director Dunn goes for School Superintendent Tay- 
lor's scalp. He didn't set it, but he says he isn't half done yet.— Wil- 
liam Bell robs his frail paramour and marries another female of the same 
class. This Bell is morally uusound, and San Quentin yawnB for him. 
^— The Allonower sails for China, and it will take a big consideration to 
bring her captain back here.— —Illicit distillery, connected with saloon at 
corner of Shotwell and Eighteenth streets, seized. Man who "gave the 
business away " will also be seized with the possession of sundry sums of 
money as a reward.^— H. B. M. steamship of war Kinqfisher comes into 
port, and an escaped lunatic from Napa is captured. No connection be- 
tween the two incidents. Man hangs himself. " Kase why ?" "Whisky. 
First Regiment comes back from San Jose, hair oil, tooth-brushes and 
all.— Corn-doctor stabs a saloon-keeper. Says the saloon-keeper poisoned 
him with whisky, which is possible if not probable. ^—Street-car con- 
ductor blows out his brains. Hitherto people have presumed that street- 
car conductors had no brains. — ■■■Steamship ZeoUindia arrives from Aus- 
tralia with the usual supply of bearded, bob-shoed and short-coated tour- 
ists.— —City and County Attorney petitions for a re-hearing of the Spring 
Valley suits just decided. What is the sense of asking a Court to make 
a decision one day and reverse it the next? Dennis Toohy's Land 
League meets, and rubs its hands gleefully at the prospect of " England " 
getting licked in the Egyptian trouble.— —Seven of the twelve jurymen 
in the Moroney case say that to put a pistol behind a man's ear and try 
to blow his brains out is not an attempt to commit murder.-^— Another 
suicide. Too little of this world's goods and a prospect of a more equal 
division in the Beyond.-^— Board of Election Commissioners refuse to or- 
der a municipal election. If the Court should agree in that decision, the 
" boys " will weep loud enough to be heard on the top of Mount Shasta. 
—Ship launched. Moved "gracefully down the ways," of course. 
^— The legal existence of Police Court No. 2 challenged by a trio of 
swindlers. Far cheaper to put up straw bail and jump the ranch.— ^One 
of the Escambia crew drifts ashore. Too late for the Consular Court to 
examine him. Besides, he was dead and various portions of him missing, 
which would impair his utility as a witness. ^—Public schools reopen, 
and large numbers are turned away for want of accommodation. Brit- 

ish steamship Serapis libeled for coming to this port with improperly con- 
structed bunks.— —The alleged cases of smallpox on the Belgic are said 
not to be the simon-pure article, and the passengers threaten to sue the 
city for improper detention. Big job for the lawyers. —Captain of the 
Anjer Head invites a saucy Custom House employee to eat on shore. The 
wages of cheek are " pay for your own grub." «The Republican clubs 
organized all over the city. Purpose, beating the brains out of the De- 
mocracy.^— P. M. and 0. & 0. steamship companies propose carrying 
tea instead of Coolies in future. Bridget will make the tea.-^— IT. S. 
authorities looking round the bay for a suitable quarantine station. Some 
of the TJ. S. authorities need quarantining.^— Man from Eureka says 
George Ross, the man who says he is a descendant of Elizabeth Ross, is a 
humbug. 

PACIFIC COAST AND EASTERN NOTES. 
Member of Congress utters language unfit for publication. Common 
occurrence for Congressmen to utter language so destitute of common 
sense as to be unfit for publication.— Republican Senators hold a cau- 
CU8 — to cnss the Democrats, perhaps. A woman and three children 
starve to death in Kansas. Hunger in the midst of plenty. ^— Two men 
shot by desperadoes at Flagstaff, N. M. The whole town is said to be in 
pursuit of the murderers. New Mexican towns must run on wheels.^— 
More Billinsgate in Congress. ^— Two steamers collide in New York har- 
bor. Nobody hurt — except the underwriters.-^— Report of the experts 
says that the Doyle bond plates were forgeries, but that they were not 
made at a blacksmith's fortie.^— Antioch saloonkeeper shoots his wife 
and a young man. Green-eyed monster. ^—Captain of the steamer lost 
on the Ohio last week goes crazy. Loses both ship and reason ; big loss. 
^—Patent issued for the Rancho Los NosagleB, Los Angeles. Garden 
patch of 1,037 acres. -^— Rumor that Senator Kellogg will be indicted in 
connection with the Star Route frauds. Better get one conviction before 
any other indictments are found. ■ Postal officials still after fast trans- 
continental mails. Unofficially, some of them are after fast females.^— 
Three residents of San Bernardino try to enter in through the "pearly 
gates" by means of poison. Two fail, which is regretable.— —President 
of Guatemala visits New Orleans. The Mayor and other functionaries 
meet the visitor and offer to show him a Returning Board, a stuffed 
ballot-box, a primary, and one or two other implements connected with 
our system of self-government. —^Chicago broker shot dead by his 
mistress. Should not have had such an appendage. ■^—Baptist parson in 
Troy writes love letters to one of the young lady members of his flock, 
and gets yanked before the deacons in consequence. They all do it!— — 
State of Kansas said to be harvesting the largest wheat crop ever pro- 
duced in that commonwealth.— —Renegade Apaches attack an Arizona 
town. Work off a little of their exuberance of animal spirits. -^Strikes 
continue in the East. Strikers seem to be striking at the air — and hitting 
it.^— Roscoe Conkling is serenaded, and he talks to his neighbors of 
Utica, but he doesn't tell them anything about the three happy homes he 
invaded, in the guise of friendship, and broke up.^— O'Donovan Rossa 
prepares to blow up "England." " Send round the hat" is generally the 
first move.— Lightning knocks a building over on a saloon in Little 
Rock, Kansas. Twenty or thirty people killed in the saloon. Big sub- 
ject for a temperance lecture.— Iron strike in Chicago ended. Strikers 
strike higher wages.— Pennsylvania Republicans make desperate efforts 
to harmonize. Anything for victory and spoils.— —A locomotive fired by 
hydrogen gas runs from Patterson to Jersey City. If the superfluity of 



Congressional gas could only be utilized in that way!— Apacba Indians 
run off the horses of a force of Rangers who were pursuing them. Next 
time the Rangers had better do their pursuing on foot, and then they 
won't catch up with the pursued and be robbed.-^— Red Bluff woman 
takes laudanum because sne loves another man better than her husband. 
The usual method with ladies affected in. this way is to give the laudanum 
to the husband, aod take " the other man."^— Fresno man falls out of a 
wagon on bis head and breaks his neck ; head too hard to break.— A 
Shasta thermometer is reported as "standing at 106 in the shade." When 
it gets two degrees higher it will take a seat— One of the accidental 
tribe of guns goes off and kiDs a man at Calistoga. Better hang the gun. 
—Powder throws rocks at six people on a New York railroad, and kills 
them. Wouldn't have, only it exploded.-^— Stage robber stops coach ; 
W., F. Co.'s messenger stops stage robber with a leaden messenger.-^— 
School war in San Jose ; not so much in the cause of education as in the 
cause of spoils. Doctors submit a report on Guiteau's brain. Will 
some person now report on the report so that we may all know what it 
means ?^— New York Produce Exchange wants wheat to be uniformly 
graded, but not with a pick and shovel. ^— Three New Yorkers die from 
the effect of heat. There is a San Francisco journalist who dyes, but 
not from the effect of heat.— General O. 0. Howard, retired from West 
Point, sent off to the Southwest, where he will have a chance to pray 
while he is keeping out of the way of the Indians.— General Swaim 
and Secretary Lincoln fall out — what of or where to no one knows. 



FOREIGN NOTES. 

An amendment to the Repression Bill proposed by the Government and 
rejected by an overwhelming majority. Commons make an overwhelm- 
ing mistake.— British war preparations continue. The Lion is on his 
hauncnes getting ready for a spring.^— Revolutionary proclamations, 
signed by a cousin of the Emperor, found in Russia. The Emperor's rel- 
ative proclaims himself a traitor, as it were. General Skobeleff dies 
suddenly. Mystery darker than the Siberian mines. Murder, suicide or 
natural causes ? Sultan of Turkey changes his Ministry and also his 
underclothing.^— Sultan of Turkey confers with TJ. S. Minister Wal- 
lace ; wants to know how a primary election is manipulated in this conn- 
try. ^^Letters from Lord Byron's wife to his sister said to be in existence 
which disprove the horrible slander published by Mrs. Stowe in 1869. 
Stow Mrs. Stowe's story away with all other falsehoods.— Crop pros- 
pects in England gloomy, but not half so gloomy as the prospectors.— 
Coronation of the Czar fixed for 1st September — unlesB the Nihilists ob- 
ject. Forty Mexican soldiers attack 18 smucglers. Battle rages furi- 
ously for 15 hours. One smuggler killed. Had the battle continued to 
rage furiously for 216 hours all the smugglers would have been killed. 
-^—British Commissioners go to Madrid to purchase mules. Had to; the 
mule3 wouldn't go to them.^— " Phiz," otherwise H. K. Browne, who 
illustrated many of Dickens' works, dies. A dead phiz. ^— Admiral Sey- 
mour threatens to bombard Alexandria if the fortifications are not sur- 
rendered ' within 24 hour3. " —American Admiral sends word to the 
Egyptains that if his vessels are hit he will return the fire, either with his 
64-pound smooth-bore guns, his pistol, or his mouth.— —Bang ! bang! 
The guns of the British fleet open fire. " Victory or Westminster Ab- 
bey" once more. «^— The Repression BUI is signed. Murder in Ireland 
won't be half as much fun as it used to be.— Two Mexican army officers 
fight a duel. Both killed. That's business.— Flag of truce hoisted over 
Alexandria. Turns out to be a flag of humbug. City on fire in several 
places. Very sultry neighborhood.— Explosion of gas in Paris. French- 
men very gassy and explosive. ^— Train runs off the track in Russia; 175 
people killed; 170 Nihilists and the balance royalists. — —T wo Flahertys, 
from America, have been arrested in Ireland. They hail from the State 
of California.— James Gordon Bennett's yacht arrives at Constantinople. 
The forts fired a royal salute as it was passing up to the city. 

ENGLISH COKE. 

Best Old Company's Sugar Loaf 

Lump Lehigh Coal. 

Anthracite Egg Coal. 
Cumberland Coal, 
Pig Iron and all 
Stecixra. and House Coals. 

For Sale in Lots to Suit, at W LOWEST MAJtKET RATES. 

BLACK DIAMOND COAL 

M.'G CO., 

Corner Spear and Folsom Streets. 

ASSESSMENT NOTICE. 

Albion Consolidated Mining Company. —Location of prin- 
cipal place of business, San Francisco, California. Location of works, Eureka 
Mining District, Eureka, Nevada.— Notice is hereby given, that at a meeting of the 
Board of Directors, held on the 20th day of Jane, 1882, an assessment (No. 11) 
of Twenty-five Cents per share was levied upon the capital stock of the corpora- 
tion, payable immediately in United States gold coin, to the Secretary, at the of- 
fice of the Company, Boom 9, No. 327 Pine street, San Francisco, Cal. 

Any stock upon which this assessment shall remain unpaid on the THIRTY-FIBST 
(31st) day of JULY, 1382, will be delinquent, and advertised for sale at public auction, 
and, unless payment is made before, will be sold on MONDAY, the TWENTY-F1BST 
day of AUGUST, 1882, to pay the delinquent assessment, together with cost of 
advertising and expenses of sale. By order of the Board of Directors. 

D. B. CH1SHOLM, Secretary. 
065ce -Boom 9, No. 327 Pine street, San Francisco, Cal. July 15. 

PAINTING, TINTING, WHITENING AND PAPER-HANGING. 

Gentlemen about to nave work in tnis line done will ben- 
efit themselves by calling at my establishment, examine samples of workman- 
ship, and getting- estimat es of Cost. Orders sent by telephone (No. 433) from any 
part of the city promptly attended to. E XL GALLAGHER, 

July 8. 611 Sacramento Street, bet. Montgomery and Kearny. 



July 15, 1882, 



CALIFORNIA ADVERTISER. 



15 



CRADLE. ALTAR. AND TOMB. 



CRADLE. 

BoLLitniK In Oil* city, July 4, to the wife ol W, BotUnftW, a daughter. 
Huir. In tint til*. Jul\ '.». to Um wife <>f r'runk luker. twin*. 

Oi miiNutvis— In thi» citi, July i», to the wins .>i Jotopfa Cuniiurton, -\ duightar. 

Clark — In loll cltv, July '.*. bo tin- wifa ol William Clark, a daughter. 
IHlv alli In this dty, July 7. to the wife of S H Delvml 0, a son. 
KimiL bos -In this city. July 8, to Uw wtfo of If, K. hVrguson, a son. 
Oihrabd- lit this i-ily. July 10, to the wife .-f Win J. UtTrunl, iv son. 
BlNoi 1" Ihll oh\jr, July 7. to the wife of K. A QringV, a daughter. 
Ilcuitr— lu this cily, July 10. to the wife of M II. Himwy, ■ mm, 
HlLDUKANDT— In thit city, July 10. t-^ the wife ■ ■( Kn .1 \\ . Hil.l. hramlt, a son. 

Bon in tin* eity. July ii, to tito wlfo of H. 0. Hoyt ft daughter, 

Hi leaUDW— At wa, Juno 23, to the wife >•[ Oaptolo J. S. Hutchinson, twins. 
Jacobson In loll city, July 9. to the wife of S. Jacobson, a son 
Koiilhkko - In this iiiy, July 10, to the flrftl of Qoi. Kohlberg, a daughter. 
KOVftAD In this i-itj, July 6. to the wife of JoMOfl L Konrad, a daughter. 
McKUL— In tola city. July — , to the wife of Adolph McNeil, a daughter. 
McMAXl n -In toll city, July 7, to the wife of M. McMumu, a son. 
MORROW -In thin city, July 7, to the wife of Win. W. Morrow, a sou. 
HcKkcmh In this city, July 7, to the wife of William II. MeKenney, a sou. 
O'Brii.n In tina city, July :>, to the wife of John O'Brien, a daughter. 
PtutlR -In tins city, July 9, to the wife of L. Pciscr, a son. 
Pl.vtt -In this city, Juno SO, to the wife of S. Piatt, a son. 
Pkkkv -In thujutv, July D. to the wife of David Perry, a daughter. 
BUVUS— In this city, July 10, to the wife of John H. Sievers, a son. 
Shirk* —In this city. July B. to the wife of Rudolph Shirek, a daughter. 
Thomas-- In Alameda, July tj, to the wife of W. P. Thomas, a daughter. 
WiLOfs— In this city, July 7, to the wife of Chas. Wilgus, a daughter. 
WoODBQIV— 111 this "city, July 4, to the wife of B, Woodruff, a daughter. 
Wkllkr — In this city, July (f, to the wife of Thomas Weller, a daughter. 
Whitkhiao— In this" city, July 7, to the wife of W. C. Whitehead, a daughter. 

AIjTAR. 

Bi hiilkr-Homkikk— July S, Frederick Buehler to Katie Homeier. 

BllLsTdis-NtCKKL— July S, Leonhard Beilstein to Herraine Nickel. 

Di GiiBTALDi-O sski.manx— July 6, Emilio de Ghctaldi to Emma Cusselmann. 

Dl St. QuutAlK-SOBKUf— July 6, Ferdinand de St. Germain to Angele Sornin. 

FoRD-MooKK-At the Registry Offbe, Newton Abhott, Devonshire, England, on Sun- 
day, June 18, 18S2, Thomas Ford, Esq., to Mary Moore, of Ferndale, Torquay, 
hngland, Btepsister of Thomas Edwards, Esq., of Brunswick House, Victoria 
Parade, Torquay, 

FoLGKR-HosiosBKRQ— S. B. Folger to Mollie L. S. Honigsbcrg. 

Hbhbkkt-Vjsrdya.v — July 11, Richard H, Herbert to Catherine Theresa Verdyan. 

Jamiksos-Markscual— July 10, James Jamieson to Mathilda Mareschal. 

LlBBT-MELsi.so-July 0, Daniel Barnes Libby to Louisa Melsing. 

Lro-Tybos— July 2, John H. Leo to Jennie Tyson. 

McOlrrih-Mketkrr— June **9, Charles H. McCurrie to Mamie Meeteer. 

Nicrblsbcro-Cahn — July 2, Siegfried Nickelsburg to Palmyra Cahn. 

PrrKRa-SciiLLESBCRQ— July 9, George Peters to Henrietta Chr. Sehulenburg. 

Vestlra-Dklcamkr— July 11, Anton Ventura to Polly Delcamer. 

Wilkes-Coleman— Julv 9. William P. Wilkins to Elizabeth J. Coleman. 

Willcox-Hayiilrs— July 10, E. B. Willcox to Tillie E. Hayburn. 

TOMB. 

Bisciiorc— In N. V. City, June 7, Dr. Earnest W., son of Henry and A, Bischoff. 

Ferral— July 9, John Ferral, a native of Ireland, aged 82 years. 

Greek — July 8, Henry Green, a native of Pennsylvania, aged 60 years. 

GiLCURiST— July 8, Mary Gilchrist, a native of Ireland, aged 28 years 

Hulbkrt — At Dcrweut Lodge, Thornton heath, Surrey, England, June 13, William 

Henry Hulbert, aged 74 years, 3 months and l days. 
Hotchkiss — .July 6, Captain Henry W. Hotchkiss, a native of New Haven, Conn. 
Hoffmann— July 9, John Hoffman, a native of Germany, aged 40 years. 
Lucas— July 8, John, eldest son of John and Bridget Lucas. 
Mt'RPMY— July 7, Margaret Murphy, a native of Ireland, aged 40 years. 
Meyer — July 7, Louis C. Meyer, a native of San Francisco, aged 31 years. 
Priquet— July9, Peter F. Priquet, a native of France, aged 67 years. 
Reynolds— July 8, James H. Reynolds, a native of Ireland, aged 50 years. 
Rodqers— July 10, Sara Rodgers, a native of Ireland. 
Reicu— July S, Rosa Reich, aged 29 years. 
Stcmpf— July 8, Flora Stumpf, aged 33 years. 

Shkhy — July 7, Robert Sheehy, a native of Ireland, aged 61 years. 
Sweeten— July 10, John Sweeten, aged 36 years. 
Sloan— July 7. James Sloan, aged 2 years, 



MINING EXPERTS MINING DIRECTORS. 

In a recent issue of the Evening Bulletin, under the head of "Ex- 
ploiting Mines," appeared a very uncalled-for and, in some respects, un- 
truthful article, or attack, upon Professor Silliman, not only as a mining 
expert, but also as a scientist ; and under cover of this article there was 
an attempt to puff up Messrs. Price, Hogue and Ashburner, the old 
proverb, that " people who live in glass houses should not throw stones," 
being apparently forgotten. Did the editor of the Bulletin ever hear of 
such a mine as " The Little Amador," or the "London and California 
Mining Co J'* If not, we refer him to the London Times of December 2, 
1872, and the London Standard, November 23, 1872, also the London 
Mining Journal of the same date. The Little Amador was floated on the 
London market like the Little Emma, but, if anything, the reports had 
less truthfulness in them, particularly as to reserves, than those written 
to place the Little Emma. What about the " Robinson mine ?" see 
late New York papers respecting it; the " Sulphur Bank," with millions 
of reserves; the Tuolumne mines, with their valuable dumps; the El Do- 
rado county gold mines, and a host of others, the reports relative to which 
would double discount Professor Silliman's. No doubt all of these ex- 
perts have been thoroughly imposed upon, though there can be no pos- 
sible excuse for the mistakes made in the published geology of the Corn- 
stock, misleading many by their want of knowledge of the commonest 
rocks. Mining experts, so-called, are one of the evils incident to the 
growth of a new mining community. They know little or nothing of 
practical mining or milling, underground they are out of place, having 
spent fewer hours there than the practical miner has years ; they are a 
kind of mining lawyer, and generally report upon information derived 
from others, and in mining suits are like the " men of straw" in the Dub- 
lin Courts, ready to testify and give scientific evidence on either side for 
a consideration. They consist of two classes— the first, the wise men from 
the East — geologists, surveyors, schoolmasters, assayers, etc. The second 
grade are of a much lower order, persons whose former occupations were 
such as dealers in card-board and ivory, liverymen, mechanical assayers, 
and even draymen — their knowledge of mining consisting principally of 
some scientific expressions committed to memory, and loud, coarse, hood- 
lum vulgarity, Baid to be attractive in New York, where they regard it 



aa common mining terms. Thin chwN arc frequently employed here by 
certain capitalist* to make Loom and faat barnuiu, *<> that if the purchase 
of a mine turn* out well it belongs to the capTtsUit, otherwise to outsider* 
impOMd upon by the report-* of tQOM vulgar experts. In thin country it 
only naeiiin necessary to choose a profession ami, like the Irishman QDOH 
liiw arrival in New York, to bfl it. 

The geologist bsi only to Bod Rome fossil, even should it be ten miles 
from tin- mine be i* to report opon, and it is quite suffloient to enable 
him to know all about it. Others have only to look at a mine through a 
microscope to arrive at the same result The surveyor Iihh only to point 
his instrument, whether it be in ailjiiHtinent or not, at the mine, be the 
works ever ho far distant, and he at once buconies a mining expert, and 
will most likely swear that he has been a miner for twenty-five years. 
Me will report upon a gold or copper mine, and stake his reputation upon 
its being " no wildcat," or against a quicksilver mine by saying the " vol- 
canic action was too strong." The assayor knows all about the mine from 
assays made from the ore, and he, also, becomes a mining expert from the 
date of his first test, whether it be correct or not. The geological survey 
of the State cost hundreds of thousands of dollars. Its object was to train 
a number of men as mining experts at the public expense. The result 
was very different from that hoped for. We understand that a num- 
ber of most valuable gold specimens, etc., were given them for the use of 
this raining community. What has become of them ? Are they at the 
Bulletin office ? Do fie Regents of the University know anything about 
them ? Or have they been taken away by the " wise men from the East " 
for safe keeping ? Fortunately, California possesses a few gentlemen of 
learning, experience, sagacity and unblemished reputation, and parties 
wishing to invest in our mining enterprises need malte no mistakes. Un- 
der the recent decision of the Supreme Court, in the case of the Santa 
Cruz Company vs. Claus Spreckels, it appears that assessments cannot be 
collected upon stock issued as fully paid up. Mining Directors naturally 
feel somewhat alarmed, and, should they possess any financial responsi- 
bility, will be more careful in the future in lending their names to give 
respectability to and assist in floating worthless enterprises. 

PURE BAKING POWDER. 

Bread is an article of food which, in some shape or form, enters into 
every meal one eats. It is, therefore, of the first importance to have it 
made in a wholesome way, and with pure ingredients. In order to secure 
this result it is necessary to use a reliable, wholesome baking powder. As 
the market is perfectly overrun with all descriptions and kinds of vile 
compounds, sold under the name of baking powder, the housekeeper may, 
in fact must, naturally inquire which particular brand, if any, of those 
which are offered for sale can be regarded as pure, wholesome and reliable. 
This iB but a reasonable query, and, in order to answer it, one must, in 
the first place, define what constitutes a pure, wholesome, reliable baking 
powder, A pure and reliable leavening agent, or baking powder, can 
only be made out of two ingredients — bicarbonate of soda and cream of 
tartar properly dried and well mixed together in proportionate quantities. 
That which is compounded out of other ingredients — phosphates, alum, 
ammonia, starch, flour, etc.— or in which other ingredients in large or 
small quanties are used, is not and cannot be pure and reliable. That is 
the standard test of purity by which all reliable chemists try baking 
powders. This being so, the next query is, what brand comes up to its 
requirements? The answer is simple. Chemical analysis shows that the 
New England Baking Powder is up to the standard, and is absolutely 
pure ; chemical analysis also shows that almost every other brand offered 
for sale is adulterated with some ingredient that is foreign to its nature 
and purposes, and which impairs its strength or renders it absolutely 
dangerous. 

This being so, it naturally follows that careful housewives should use 
the New England. With the fact before her that it is pure, wholesome 
and reliable, while almost all other brands are impure and unwholesome- 
some being absolutely poisonous — the housewife who uses any powder 
other than the New England is little lesB than a murderess, for she is 
needlessly risking the health and lives of those for whom she is catering. 



BOYCOTTING THE AMERICAN SHOE STORE! 

To the Law-abiding: Citizens of San Frail Cisco: Having been, 
as I believe, unjustly slandered and persecuted in the past week by an Order 
calling themselves "League of Deliverance," and wishing to be judged aright among 
my friends and customers who are not acquainted with the facts of the case, I take 
this method of defending myself. On Wednesday morning, July 5th, a man appear- 
ed in front of ray store, placarded: "ENEMY TO WHITE LABOR-BUTTER. 
FIELD'S SHOE STORE, 777 AND 779 MARKET STREET." Another began dis- 
tributing bills: "CHINESE SHOES SOLD AT BUTTERFI ELD'S. LEAGUE OF 
DELIVERANCE RESPECTFULLY REQUEST YOU TO KEEP AWAY FROM HIS 
STORE." Later in the day a man named Frank Roney, with a number of men (sup- 
posed to be members of the League), waited upon me at my store, and told me that 
unless I joined their League they would break up my business. Never having been 
called upon by any of their Committees, and being very indignant at their proceed 
ingsand threats, I flatly refused to do so, ai.d told them, as a free American citi- 
zen, in free America, I would buy and sell when and where I pleased ; that I would 
not be forced to join any Order because I feared to make an honest livelihood. 
Will you, my fellow-citizens, countenance this outrage? Must I fight this battle 
single-handed ? or will you stand by me, as all should stand by one another, in the 
cause of freedom and right? I HAVE PATRONIZED WHITE LABOR by having a 
large stock of their goods on hand at all times, and shall continue doing so in the fu- 
ture ; at the same time, it is true I have bought and sold Chinese made shoes. Was it 
a crime, when others are doing the same thing? In no other way have I ever encour- 
aged Chinese labor. My help has been White in every capacity, and, had the 
League informed themselves, they would have found that I am as much opposed to 
Chinese labor as any of its members, and much more so than many of them. I will 
neither be threatened nor driven from the right, but will stand firm in my own in- 
tegrity ; and I am sure my friends and the friends of freedom will sustain me in my 
cause. Respectfully, B. O. BUTTERF1ELD. 
_ [ July 15.1 

Excellent Shirts made to order. Balbriggan and other fine under- 
wear at Carmany's, 25 Kearny. 



16 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER AND 



July 15, 1882. 



REAL ESTATE TRANSACTIONS. 

Recorded in the City and County of San Francisco. California, for 

the Week ending July 11, 1882. 
Compiled from the Heciyrds of the Commercial Agency , 401 California St. , S. F. 



Wednesday, July 5th. 



GRANTOR AND GRANTEE. 



Frederick Clay to T Lyons , 

G G Hurlbut to C McCormick 

T L Commrs to Maurice Long .... 
Lily H White to Silas A White. . . , 

Paul Rousset to Jno H Smyth 



Geo Strasser to LisetteK Strasser. 

Henry Mahon to J W Farren 

J Westbeimer to Adelia McEntire. 



J Schoenfeld to Jno Boyle 

Patb R Walsh to Ely W Piayter. 



J M ComerfordHib Sav & L Soc. 



Geo E Otes to Clara C Conroy 

Geo F Thornton to Robt Perrin . . , 



Root Perrin to F S Wensinser 
E C Maeten to I G Wickersham. . 



DESCRIPTION. 



Lots 13 to 20, blk 46, City Land Associ- 
ation 

E Cook, 464:7 n Pt Lobos avenue, n 25i 
120, being in Western Addition 641. 

Sw Garden, 75 nw Bryant, nw 25x75,be- 
ing in 100-vara 233 

W Larkin, 117:6 b Union, s 20x80, being 
in Western Addition 88 ; e Mission 
195n25tb, n 25x115 

Nw J st and 13th ave, w 240, n 60, e 120, 
n 341, e 120, e 401 to beg, being in 
Outside Land 685; n J st, 127:6 w 14tb 
avenue, n 357, w 98, s 357, e 64 to 
beg, being in Outside Land 686. . . . 

S Waller, 106:3 e Steiner, e 25x120, being 
in Western Addition 373 

Undivided H nw 26th ave and A street, 
n 125x165, being in Outside Land 258. 

Nw Chenery, 238 sw Roanoke, sw 50 x 
100 

Lot 32, blk 58, Dunpby Tract 

S O'Farrell. 39:6 w Webster, w 22:6x120 
being in Western Addition 307 ; lols 
2, 6, 8, 17. blk 364, and lots 10, 15, blk 
364, and lots 10, 15, blk 365, Great 
Park Homestead 

Sw Dolores and Duncan, s 51:6x100, be 
ing in Harpers Addition 56 ; sw Guer- 
rero and Duncan, s 114x110, being in 
Harpers Addition 36 

Property recorded in liber 994 Deeds 
page 282 

Lots 42 to 48, blk 170, O'Neil and Haley 
Tract 

Same 

Ne 3d, 237:6 se Bryant, nw 137:6 x ne 28, 
being in 100-vara 96 



5 
Gift 



Gift 
1,000 



Thursday, July 6th. 



Hib Sav & L Soc to B Pfeiffer 

Jno R Springer to Adolph Grimm. 

M A Eldemann to J N Straub 

Mary J Blair to Geo H Dana et al. 

DPorterto J W Blake 

M A Smith to Jennie Smith 

T L Commrs to Ann MorriBBey 

I Glazier etal to Danl Speyer 



Nw Jessie, 306 sw 3d, sw 24x80, being 
in 100-vara 15 

W Stockton, 28 s Chestnut, s 27x74, be- 
ing in 50-vara 680 

Ne Guerrero and Ridley, e 30x75, being 
in Mission Block 22 

Nw Howard, 91:8 ne Beale, ne 45:10 x 
137:6, being- in Beach and Water 382. . 

Ne Geary and Steiner, n 75x67:6, being 
in Western Addition 358 

N Vallejo, 1Z5 w Jones, w 25x137:6, be. 
ing in 50-varas 866 and 873 

Se Harrison, 225 sw 6th, sw 25x75, being 
in 100-vara 232 

N Sutter 137:6 w Franklin, w 65x120, 
being in Western Addition 128 



Friday, July 7th. 



H Scbniedersto H L Koeford.. 



Tbos Magee to Bertha Lanzendorf 
H Hinkel to C L Hinbel 



Fannie M Samson to W J Sinon. 
Eli Hochstadter to S W Glazier. . 



S W Glazier to F Blake. - . . 
S L Theller to H A Crane. . 



L HnBsey to Bridget Hussey . 



Same to Same 

Caroline Koster to Alfred Koster. 



Same et al to Christian Hess. . 



E Guerrero, 111:6 8 27th, e 30, e 75:2, n 
30:5%, w 80:7 to beg, being in HarperB 
Addition 3 

N Vallejo, 109:6 w Polk, w 25x122:6, be- 
ing in Western Addition 47 

S Bash, 90 e Buchanan, e 47:6, s 71:6, w 
35:6,' n 23, wl2,n 68:6 to beg, being 
in Western Addition 233 

S Union, 68:6 e Hyde, e 23x67:6, being In 
50-vara 1294 

N Sacramento, 142:2 w SnnBome, e 25:6x 
59:9, being In Beach and Water lota 
182,183,184 

Same 

W Valencia, 80 n 18th, n 25x100, being 
in MiBSion Block 70 

Nw Perry st, 500 sw 4th, sw 25x75,being 
in 100-vara 178 

Lots 142 and 148, Spring Valley Hd.. 

Undivided % nw Clementina, 275 sw 4th 
sw 68:9x80, being in 100-vara 142 . . 

Same 



$ 450 
1,700 

5 
150 

5 
13,200 



5 

Gift 



Saturday, July 8th. 



N Atkinson to J J Lane.. 



Silas Sellecb to C H Wakelee., 
C H Wakelee to A Crawford.., 



Edw Dunscomb to F H Bnrke. . . . 

T H Porter by shff to Same 

Geo W Haight to E S McLaren. . . 



P Craig to O D Baldwin 

Milton A Wheaton to J Duffy.. 



S L Theller et al to Same 

Asa Fisk to ChaB F Merrifield ... 



W Murphy to Mary E Pleasant. . . , 



Same to Same 

Same to Ricbd Carroll . 



David Stewart to B McManus 

Jas Nolan to Hannah Wortsmith. 



Catharine ChrlBt to K Wahler .... 



S Sacramento, 165 e Baker, e 27:6x132:6. 
being in Western Addition 341 

Same 

Sundry lots in Outside Land blocks 755 
and 782 

W Columbia, 234 n 23d, n 26x100 

N 23d, 25 e Columbia, e 50x104 

E Scott, 125 s Ellis, B 25x00, being in 
Western Addition 431 

Nw Jessie, 275 sw 5th, sw 22:6x80,being 
in 100-vara 201 

E Valencia, 160 n 17th, n 25x87:6, being 
in Mission Block 40 

Same 

Lot 195, Mission and 30th Street Home 
stead Union 

N Broad Aveune, 420 e Marengo street.e 
220x125: lot 9 and part 8, blk K, Rail- 
road Hd Assn 

S Clementina, 525 sw 5th, sw 25x75, be- 
ing^ in 100-vara 205 

Sw Harrison and Garden, sw 25x75, be- 
ing in 100-vara 232 

Se Natoma, 75 sw Rubb, bw 25x75 

3 Glover, 252:6 w Jones, w 22:6x60, be- 
ing in 50-vara 875 

W Nebraska, 450 s Yolo, s 25x100, being 
in Potrero Block 84 



900 
500 



3,500 

12,000 

5 



1,S 



800 

7 

7 
1,500 

600 

300 



Monday, July 10th- 



GRANTOR AND GRANTEE. 



Frances H Lowndes to J Whelan. 
Saml J Bridge to Theo Dehon .... 

Louisa Welti to Chas Welti 

Jno Reynolds to Geo Werner 



Henry Casebolt to Same 

Jno Sephton to Adam Ritchie. . 



Jno Graham to Saml Crim _ 

Francis Donohue to KateDonohue 
Geo W Frink to Patk Duffy & wf., 



Same to Margt Fiely et al , 

Lucy A Briggs to Jos Nichols.. 



Enos Nichols et al to Same 

Thos Gallagher to Frank Locoste. 



DESCRIPTION. 



E Hoff avenue, 123 n 17th, n 60x102, be- 
ing in Mission Block 40 

Ratifies deeds recorded in liber 81 deeds 
page 287 

Lot 4, blk 515, Bay View Homestead 
Association 

N Union, 122:1 w Octavia, w 30x137:6, 
being in Western Addition 189 

Same 

Se Howard, 405 sw 1st, sw 25x85, being 
in 100-vara 47 

Lot 3, bib 24, West End Map No 2 

N Duncan, 125 w Guerrero, w 59x114 .. 

Ne Chesley, 250 nw Bryant, nw 25x80, 
being in 100-vara 273 

Ne Chesley. 225 nw Bryant, nw 25x80, 
being in 100-vara 273 

E Stockton, 81:6 s Clay, s 55:8, e 68:9, n 
46:10, w 68:9; se Stockton and Clay, e 
68:9x59:8 

Same, life interest 

W Dupoot, 20 n Pine, w 57:6 x n 40, be- 
ing m 50-vara 283 



2,600 
1 



1 

2,000 

3,345 

5 

Gift 

275 

275 



Gift 
11,000 



Tuesday, July I lth. 



Henry C Campbell to W D St Clair 



W F Lapidge to Thos Ridlington . 



Mary Joyce to Thos Cunningham. 
Francis B Wilde to G W Frink. . . 
H F Williams to Jas D Connel.... 



H M Cox to A J Morrell 

E H Miller, Jr, to Mary E Logan. . 



M H Turrill to Robt Sherwood. . 



Peter Craig to Alex W Wilson . 
Vincenzo Guscetti to T Gianuinni 



J E Davis et al to J B Lewie.. 



Sw Market and 16th, bw 154:91$, 
100:7J<S, e 117:8* to beg, being in Mis- 
sion Block 126 

E Lapidge, 300 n 19th, n 25x80, being in 

Mission Block 71 

C E Nougues to Robt C Johnson.. 'Potrero Nuevo block 107, etc 

Thos Bartnett to E Crummy Lot 29, block 210, Gardeuville Home- 
stead Assn 

Lot 32, block 39, City Land Assn 

Lota 10 and 11, blk 1, JohnBon Tract... 

Lots 13 to 24, 37 to 42, bib 94, O'Neil & 
Haley Tract 

Part lot in Laurel Hill Cemeterv 

N California, 70 e Webster, e 35x132:6, 
being in Western Addition 271 

N Vallejo, 137:6 w Buchanan, n 137:6. w 
4, e 7:6 to beg, being in Western Addi- 
tion 264 

S Eddy, 25 e Mason, e 50x70, being in 
50-vara 962 

Undivided # lots 27, 28, bib 13, Univer- 
sity Mound Survey 

EChnrch, 171:10 e Reservoir, n 28:2, e 
67:6, se 100, se 75, w 172:2#, nw 101:3 
to beginning 

Se Center and Connecticut, e 20C 
257:1X. aw 181:10, sw22:8,n263:5)j'to 
beginning 

N Host, 125 w Baker, w 25x137:6, being 
in Western Addition 584 

Same 



Mason & Bensley to Same . 



Margt Menar to Jno Tanner 

Jno Tanner to Robt Van tright... 



$4,000 

550 

13,000 

1,050 

35 

5 

1300 

5 
13,500 



1 
29,400 
1,000 

12 



1 

1,500 



GEO. STREET, Agent News Letter, 30 Comhill, E. C, London. 

JOYCE'S SPORTING AMMUNITION. 

[ESTABLISHED 1820.] 
rilhe attention of Sportsmen is invited to the following 

J Ammunition, of the best quality, now in general use throughout England, 
India and the Colonies : Joyce's Treble Waterproof and F 3 Quality Percussion 
Caps; Chemically-prepared Cloth and Felt Gun Wadding; Joyce's Gas-Tight Car- 
tridges, for Pin-fire and Central-fire Breech-loading Guna ; Wire Cartridges, for killing 
game at long distances, and every description of Sporting Ammunition. Sold by 
alt gun-makers and dealers in gunpowder. 

FREDERICK JOYCE & CO. , Patentees and Manufacturers, 
Oct. 29. 67 Upper Thames street, London. 

LIEBIQ COMPANY'S EXTRACT OF MEAT. 

inestand Cheapest Meat* flavor ing: Stock for Soaps, Made 

Dishes and Sauces. 

LIEBIQ COMPANY'S EXTRACT OF MEAT, 

An Invaluable and Palatable Tonic in all Cases or Weak 
Digestion and Debility. " Is a success and boon for which Nations should feel 
grateful." See " Medical Press," " Lancet," -" British Medical Journal," etc. 



F 



LIEBIG COMPANY'S EXTRACT OF MEAT. 

Caution—Genuine only with fac-simile ol Baron Llebig's 
Signature, in blue ink, across Label. 
This caution is necessary owing to various cheap and inferior substitutes being in 
the market. 

LIEBIG COMPANY'S EXTRACT OF MEAT. 

To be had of all Store- keepers, Grocers and Chemists. Sole 
Agents for the United States (wholesale only), C. David & Co., 9, Fenchurch 
Avenue, London, England. Sold wholesale by RICHARDS & HARRISON, San 
Francisco. June 10. 

he Summer Sun and Dust. Ladies and all exposed to the scorching 
rays of the sun and heated particles of dust, will find that the most 
cooling and refreshing preparation for the face, hands and amis, is 

owlands- Kalydor, which eradicates all prickly Heat, Sunburn, Tan, 
Freckles, Stings of Insects, etc., and produces a beautiful and delicate 
complexion. 

Rowlands* Macassar Oil prevents the hair failing off or becoming dry 
during the hot weather, and eradicates scurf and dandruff. 

Rowlands' Odonto is the purest and most fragrant Tooth Powder ever used, 
and contains no acid or mineral ingredients, which are so detrimental 
to the teeth and gums. Its purity especially adapts it for the teeth of 
young children. Ask any dealer in perfumery for Rowlands' articles, 
of 20, Hatton Garden, London. 



T 
R 



S' 



MILLARD F. BRADLEY, 



earcher of Records, Room 37, 118 Post St.. 
Office Hours: 6 to 9 P.M. 



San Francisco. 

Jan. 28. 



July 15, 1882. 



CALIFORNIA ADYKUTISKU. 



17 



NOTABILIA. 



THE PEDDLERS SONG. 



Lawn u while u rtriren inow ; 
Cvprvai black mi o'er ww crow ; 
Oluvca «.* «»wi aj damatfc rosea ; 
Maaks Cor tatxm and fur note* ; 
Uutclo- trace let, necktaw, amber ; 
Perfume for a lady's chamber ; 



Gold <lunt|M and stomachers, 
Kur my lailt to gift their Atari; 

l'inn aiul pokinMtkki >>f ttoal. 

What maid* lack from bead to heel : 
i.'. nut l>uv of me.wnw; come buy .conic buy, 
Bnji 1»<1». or «!*« your 1iuhk.ii cry. 
Wi 



William Siiakhi'rakk. 

"Anything taken place to-day?" aaked Mr. Frelink'huysen, w h« 
walked in ami elevated his boots to the top of the Cabinet table. 
" Nothing." replied Mr. Arthur, without looking up from the tantalizing 
pages of the Patent Office Report. *' There were lots of fellows here 
who wanted to take one, however." Thus does the oasis of innocent 
mirth lighten the barren waste of official life, and every person who 
•ends $2.50 and a photograph to the News Letter MkLULLIOH COMPACT, 
receives in return 100 photograph medallions, already gummed and per- 
forated, and just the size of a postage-stamp. 

Mary had a little lamb, 

The lamb was very thin ; 
And so the butcher blew his breath 

The lam by 'a flesh within. 
The butcher's breath was very bad ; 
His teeth were much decayed ; 
ii *T w iH make the lamb look, fat," he said, 
" And lucre will be made." 

A preacher, raising his eyes from his desk in the midst of his sermon, 
was paralyzed with amazement to see his rude boy in the gallery pelting 
the bearers in the pews below with horse-chestnuts. But while the good 
man was preparing a frown of reproof, the young hopeful cried out: 
"You tend to your preachiug, daddy, and I'll keep em awake; and don't 
forget to tell them that James 11. Kelly & Co., Market street, below 
Beale, have always on hand the Imperishable paiut, which comes already 
mixed, covers three times the space that ordinary paint does, and is im- 
pervious to sun or rain." 

She slipped upon a banana peel ; 

This was sad, 
She felt older than she uaed to feel, 

This made her mad ; 
Madder yet was she at the man 

Who threw it there ; 
But maddest was she, because like a man 

She couldn't swear. — Ex. 

A Royal Hunt for Food.— Last week the Court Circular informed us 
that " Her Majesty left Bagshot after luncheon." Aunt Towzer thinks 
it '* scandalous " that the Queen of England couldn't have luncheon pro- 
vided for her, but had to leave Bagshot and go "after" it. This re- 
minds us that if Her Majesty wants to enjoy a real nice lunch, she should 
go to the Original Swain's Bakery, 213 Sutter street, San Francisco, 
where she could obtain delicious ice-creams, mince pies, confections, etc., 
and meet the very nicest class of people. 

The palm-leaf fan begins to flutter 

Along Broadway, 
Where lemonade 's sold at the gutter 

Throughout the day. 
The dog has donned his airy muzzle ; 
The thing that now his mind doth puzzle, 
Is how to grab the fly that flits 
Around and on the muzzle sits, 
With feelings of serene repose, 
About two inches from his nose. — Puck. 

Senator Sawyer, we are told, was so well pleased with a dinner pre- 
pared entirely by his two daughters, that he gave each of them a check 
for $25,000. The story, of course, is true. At least, it has an air of 
truthfulness about it that is convincing. It teaches that after a man 
has boarded some time at a Washington hotel, he is perfectly willing to 
pay $50,000 for one appetizing dinner cooked on one of those Arlington 
Ranges, which can be obtained from De La Montanya, Jackson street, 
below Battery, San Francisco. 

There was a young girl had two beaux ; 
The best-looking one was named Meaux 
But toward the cleaux 
Of his call he would deaux 
And make a great noise with his neaux. 

— Louisville Courier- Journal. 

An utterly too young married lady with a still tooer husband, 
living in one of the fashionable homes (?) of the day, worked a motto with 
the inscription, " God Bless Our Flat." And a neighbor, to whom it was 
shown, had the hardihood to ask her whether she referred to her resi- 
dence or her husband. The insinuation was impertinent and uncalled-for, 
because the young lady's husband is not a flat. He wears stylish, well- 
made hats, which he buys from White, 614 Commercial street, thus show- 
ing that he is a shrewd, clear-headed man. 



Miss Lemon was a maiden Bour- 
As any acid know — 
But tartar she had married Crab 
More crabbed she did grow ; 



And when her sisters came to call, 
Such shrieks she did begin 
Her husband said the Lemon's peal 
Did fright the Lemon's kin. 

— Home Sentinel. 



"Do boldly what you do at all." Boldly do we affirm that Kidney- 
Wort is the great remedy for liver, bowels and kidney diseases ; rheuma- 
tism and piles vanish before it. The tonic effect of Kidney- Wort is pro- 
duced by its cleansing and purifying action on the blood. Where there is 
a gravelly deposit in the urine, or milky, ropy urine from disordered kid- 
neys, it always cures. 

J. F. Cutter's Old Bourbon. — This celebrated whisky is for sale by 
all first-class druggists and grocers. Trade mark — star within a shield. 



They were out rtrfgMng. " (iuuie, dear," aaid she, an nhe leaned a 
tender cheek on hU manly ckeeked ulster. " why are theae unowflakua like 
your muatioh*? N Thii pleand him, av«n to have it noticed. " I don't 
Know, pet,*' ho murmured innocently. "Why are they?" " Because 
they Wftllow OumiDR down." He drove with both bft&dl for the remain- 
der of the trip, ami since then he has married a millionaire's daughter, 
whose grandfather says that Noble Bros., 642 Clay steet, are the beet 
house and sign painters in the city. 



Cries Sylvia to a reverend Dean: 
" What reason** can lie given, 
Since marriage is a holy thing. 
That there is none in Heaven ?" 



"There are no women," ho replied ; 
She quick returns the jest: 
" Women there are, but I'm afraid 
They cannot find a priest." 

— Dodsley. 
An old lady who had no relish for modern church music, was express- 
ing her dislike of the singing of an anthem in a certaiu church, when a 
neighbor said: " Why, that is a very old anthem. David sang it to Saul." 
To this the old lady replied: " Weel, weel, I quo for the first time un- 
derstan' why Saul threw his javelin at David." And then the old lady 
wandered off to Bradley & Rulofsou'a celebtated photographic studio, 
corner of Montgomery and Sacramento streets, and had her picture 
taken. 



Some men of might 
Go out at night 
And get so tight 



They want to fight 
Which isn't right 

By a sight. 

-Frank ford, Pa. t Herald. 



It is related of the late Earl of Derby, who was a martyr to gout, 
that on one occasion a merchant sent him a supply of sherry, informing 
him that as long as he confined himself to it he would continue free from 
his enemy; to which the statesman laconically replied that he had " found 
out that the way to avoid gout was to buy pure and unadulterated liquors 
from P. J. Cassin & Co., corner of Washington and Battery Btreets, San 
Francisco." Families supplied in retail quantities at wholesale rates. 

Did you ever have your wife tie a string on your finger to remember 
something by, and then find yourself an hour afterward trying to remem- 
ber what it was you was to remember? Not yon, you old bald-headed, 
knobby-toed bachelor. — Hello. 

The term hydra may be used to represent any manifold evil. If you 
would battle successfully with this many-headed monster of disease you 
will find it expedient to keep Mrs. Pinkham's Vegetable Compound al- 
ways at hand. — Dr. Banning. 



Between the river Styx 
And William Watkins Hyx 
I'm in a fatal fix. 



-Guiteau. 



More than half the newspapers in the world are printed in the Eng- 
lish language — that is to fay, in such English as the writers happen to 
have on hand. And every well-dressed lady goes to J. J. O'Brien & Co., 
Arcade House, near the Baldwin, and buys the Foster Kid Glove. 

This seasonable hint is from a New York paper: " To be 'thirsty ' 
is not the right way to say it, now that technical terms are fashiouahle. 
To 'suffer for the want of a draught of Napa Soda ' is the correct ex- 
pression. " 

"The parting gives me pain," as the man said when he had a trouble- 
some tooth extracted. 

Best pictures taken at the Imperial Gallery, 724£ Market street. 



POISON OAK STING 

Can be Cured by 
Calvert's Meclieal Soap, 
{20 Per Cent. Carbolic, Add). 
SST To be bad at all Drug-gUts. 



April 8. 



JAMES G. STEELE & CO.. 

DRUGGISTS AND CHEMISTS. 

Agents for RICORD'S RESTORATIVE PTT.T.S, 

635 Market Street Sun Francisco, Cal. 

I'AI.ACK HOTEL. June 24. 

R. CUTLAR, D.D.S., 

Has Removed His Dental Office 

From 715 Clay Street to No. 23 Post Street. 

Office Hours—From 10 A.M. to ti P.M. 

[May 6.] 

WILLIAM F. SMITH, M.D., 

OCULIST, 
lormerly at No. 313 Buwli street, dan removed to Pbelan's 

to 3 P.M 

May 27. 



F 

Take the Elevator. 



DR. JAMES W. KEENEY, 

AND RESIDENCE: 22 MONTGOMERY STREET. 

HOURS: 2 to 4, 7 to 7:30 p.m. 
SUNDAYS: 3 to 4 p.m. April 9. 



OFFICE 



DR. WILLIAM E. TAYLOR. 

215 GEAST ST. RESIDENCE: THE BALDWIN. 

OFFICE HOURS: 1 to 4 P.M. 



OFFICE 

Feb. 5.) 

$72*" 



$12 a day at home easily made. Costly Outfit Free. 

Address True & Co, , Augusta. Maine. 



18 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER AND 



July 15, 1882. 



BIZ.' 



The intelligence received from Europe, the past few days, baa been of 
a startling character. First, the bombardment of the port of Alexandria 
by the English Admiral, and the threatened closing of the Suez Canal by 
the Egyptians. This has been followed by wet and stormy weather 
throughout Great Britain, threatening serious injury to the ripening crops 
of Cereals, causing a sharp advance in Wheat and Flour in the English 
marts and a corresponding rise in this city. As one of the results of this 
European intelligence, shipowners here have advanced their ideas 
respecting Grain freights to tbe United Kingdom — rates now being 50s.@ 
55s., for wood and iron respectively. The disengaged fleets here, and 
near-by ports, is about 40,000 tons register, while the tonnage now on the 
way, to arrive, is about 290,000 tons, against 350,000 ton3 same date last 
year, and 150,000 tons (register) in 1880. 

WTieat exports thus far in July have not come up to general expec- 
tations, although there is a good supply of tonnage on the berth for U.K. 
Considerable old Wheat has been sold during the week in the regular way 
at $1 67^@1 72h per ctl., but the closing rate for No. 1, on Call, Spot and 
Futures (3 months) rules fromfSl 75 down. A Spot sale of Amber was 
made this week at §1 67i for export. Speculation is now quite rife, with 
large sales at both Call boards, and at rising prices. The ship Samuel 
Watts has cleared for Antwerp with 62,925 ctls., value, $103,940. 

The Wheat trade has suffered a great loss during the week by the 
death of Robert Sheehy, who for two years past has been our largest grain 
exporter. He was the owner of a large tract of land in Napa county, had 
also a 40,000-ton warehouse and wharf at South Vallejo, from which point 
he has loaded hundreds of ships since tbe death of our old friend Isaac 
Friedlander, July 11, 1878. Mr. Sheehy was a personal friend of Fried- 
lander, and has ever since the death of the " Grain King " (Friedlander) 
very worthily kept up to the top of the list of wheat exporters on the 
Pacific Slope. 

Barley has, within the past few days, recovered somewhat from the 
depression noted last week, with large speculative Bales at the Call 
Boards, notably in No. 2 Feed, which may at this writing be quoted at 
$1 20@S1 24 per cental for Spot, and near by Futures. Old Brewing 
Barley is yet scarce, and very readily commands §2 per cental. 

Com, Oats and Rye have each come to the front during the week 
with considerable transactions at the Call Boards at hardening prices. 

Wool continues in very large stock, with some slight increase in the 
demand, but no sales are reported that will justify us in giving quo- 
tations. 

Our import trade with China the first six months of the current year 
falls short S1,000,000, as compared with a corresponding period of last 
year, while our import trade with the Hawaiian Islands in same time has 
increased 81,000,000. 

Rice imports by sea from January 1st to July 1st are as follows: 
From China, 8,657,387 lbs.; British East Indies, 9,860,556 lbs.; Hawaiian, 
4,986,238 R)s. The Zealandia, from Honolulu this week, brought 773 bags, 
and the Gaelic, from Hongkong, 6,168 bags. The price of Hawaiian is 
now 5£@5$c; China, 5@6c. 

Teas. — Imports from January 1st to July 1st: China, 760,876 lbs.; 
Japan, 4,736,452 lbs.; British East Indies, 12,000 lbs. The O. and O. 
steamship Gaelic, from China and Japan on the 10th inst, brought us 
1,107 pkgs., and in transit for Eastern cities by rail 17,720 pkgs. 

Sugar. — The Consuelo, from Honolulu, brought us 7,447 bags, and the 
Zealandia, from same, 11,081 bags. Refined is now 10i@12^c. 

Coffee. — The market is overstocked, causing very low prices to rule — 
say 10@12£c. for good to choice Central American grades. 

Bags.— The Gaelic, from Hongkong, brought 865 bales Calcutta Gun- 
nies. There has been an increased demand for Grain Sacks during the 
week. Present Spot price, 8!@9£c. 

Coal and Iron. — Advices from Australia lead us to expect very large 
supplies from that quarter, and this has caused no little depression here. 
Pig Iron is out of first hands, but Pacific Coast supplies will soon be 
coming on to the market, now that the Clipper Gap mines at Hotaling 
have resumed operations. Sydney Pig Tin is the turn dearer, and the 
price 23@23fcc. 

Quicksilver. — There is no life in the market. Sales from the wharf 
continue to be made at 37c; the same holders ask 37£c. The output is 
less than last year, and the Spot stock is light. 

Grain Charters.— The latest Wheat charters reported are the British 
Bhip Carnarvonshire, 1,336 tons, Liverpool direct, £2 10s, and ship Rence, 
1,924 tons, Liverpool direct, £2 lis 3d. 

The Pacific Mail steamship Zealandia has arrived from the 
Colonies since our last, bringing her full compliment of passengers, Gov- 
ernment mails, and for cargo Sydney Pig Tin 1,376 ingots ; also, from 
Honolulu, Sugar 11,081 bags, Rice 773 bags, Opium 113 cs. 

From the Orient — The O. and O. steamship Gaelic arrived here on 
the 11th inst., bringing 600 Chinese ; also, for cargo, Rice, Sugar, Coffee, 
Teas, Gunnies, etc. ; also, in transit for Eastern cities, to go overland by 
Pacific Railroad, Teas 17,220 pkgs., Silk 349 pkgs., Mdse. 187 pkgs. 

Flour. — Prices have advanced some this week — Superfine, S5@5 25 ; 
Extra S. F., $5 50@4 75 ; Baker and Family Extras, $5 25@5 75 per 196 
lbs., all in cloth. Tbe steamer Rio de Janeiro for Panama carried en 
route to Central America 3,190 bbls. 

Tallow. — The export demand is good. The steamer for Central Amer- 
ica had 31,152 lbs., and the Mexico, for Mexican ports, 14,000 lbs.; 
} price, 10c. 

St John's Presbyterian Church, Post Street— Tbe Rev. Dr. 
Scott, pastor, will preach Sunday at the usual hours. The public cor- 
dially invited to attend. 

Krug Champagne, from Reims, France.— Private Cuvee in quarts 
and pints. Shield — Krug — in quarts and pints ; Premiere Qualite, in 
, quarts and pints. For sale by Hellmann Bros. & Co., corner Front and 
1 Jackson streets. 



RSMOVAIj 

A. F. NYE & CO. 



609 a,*x<3. Oil Market Street, 
GRAND HOTEL, 

WEEBE THEY HAVE JTJST OPENED 
A. New Stock of 

GAS FIXTURES ! 

Of the Latest Patterns and Designs. 
PACIFIC MAIL STEAMSHIP COMPANY. 

Tbe Company's steamers will sail for Yokohama and 
Hongkong: CITY OF PEKING, on or about August 1, at 2 p.m. Excur- 
sion Tickets to Yokohama and return at special rates. 

For NEW YORK via PAVAMA: GRANADA, July 19th, at 12 o'clock M-, taking 
Freight and Passengers to MAZATLAN, SAN BLAS, MANZAN1LLO and ACAPUL- 
CO, and via Acapulco for Lower Mexican and Central American ports, calling at SAN 
JOSE DE GUATEMALA and LA LIBERTAD to land Passengers and Mails. 
Fare to New York— Cabin, $139; Steerage, $65. 

Tickets to and from Europe by any line for sale at the lowest rates ; also fur Ha- 
vana and all West India ports. 

For HONOLULU, AUCKLAND and SYDNEY: ZEALANDIA, July 29th, at 2 
p.m., or on arrival of the English mails. 

$10 additional is charged for passage in Upper Cabin. Round the World Trip 
Tickets, via New Zealand and Australia, $650. 

Tickets must be purchased at least one hour before time of sailing. 

For freight or passage apply at the office, cor. First and Brannan streets. 

July 15. WILLIAMS, DIMOND & CO., G eneral Agents. 

OCCIDENTAL AND ORIENTAL STEAMSHIP CO., 

For Japan and China, leave wnarf, corner First and Bran- 
nan streets, at 2 p.m., for YOKOHAMA AND HONGKONG, connecting at 
Yokohama with Steamers for Shanghai. 

ARABIC Tuesday, May 23d I ARABIC Saturday, Aug. 12th 

OCEANIC Tuesday, June 6th OCEANIC Thursday, Au»f. 24th 

COPTIC Saturday, June 17th | COPTIC Tuesday, Sept. 5th 

BELGIC I BELGIC Thursday, Sept. 2$th 

GAELIC Saturday, July 15th | 

Excursion Tickets to Yokohama and Return at Reduced Rates. 

Cabin Plans on exhibition and Passage Tickets on sale at C. P. R. R. Co.'s General 
Offices, Room 74, corner Fourth and Towasend streets. 

For Freight, apply to GEORGE H. RICE, Freight Agent, at the Pacific Mail Steam- 
ship Company's Wharf, or at No. 202 Market street, Union Block. 

T. H. GOODMAN, General Passenger Agent. 

LELAND STANFORD, President. July 15. 

PACIFIC COAST STEAMSHIP COMPANY. 

Steamers of this Company will sail from Broadway Wharf 
as follows : 
For Victoria, B.C., and Puget Sound Ports: On the 10th, 20th and 30th of each 
month [except when such days fall on a holiday, then on the day previous). Steamer 
of the 30th connects at Port Townsendwith steamer "City of Chester" for Alaska. 
For Portland, Oregon, in connection with the 0. R. & N. Co.: Every* days. 
For San Luis Obispo, Santa Barbara, Los Angeles and San Diego: 5th, 10th, 15th, 
20th, 25th and 30th of each month. 

For Santa Cruz, Monterey, San Simeon, Cayucos, Gaviota, Santa Barbara and 
Ventura: Every Wednesday at 8 A.M. 
For Eureka, Areata, and Hookton, Humboldt Bay: Every Wednesday, 9 o'clock. 
For Point Arena, Mendocino, etc.: Every Monday. 
Ticket Office, No. 214 Montgomery Street, near Pine. 
GOOD ALL, PERKINS & CO., Agents, 
Nov. 26. No. 10 Market stree t. 

FOR PORTLAND AND ASTORIA, 0REQ0N. 

The Oregon Railway and Navigation Company and Pacific 
Coast Steamship Company will dispatch every four days, from Spear-street 
Wharf, for the above ports, one of their new Al Iron Steamships, via. : COLUMBIA 
OREGON and STATE OF CALIFORNIA. 

Sailing Bays 
July 1,8, 10, 14, 18,22, 26.30- j Aug 3,7. 11, 15, 19,23,27,31. 

At 10 o'clock A.. M. 
Connecting at Portland, Oregon, with Steamers and Railroads and their connecting 
Stage Lines for all points in Oregon, Washington and Idaho Territories, British 
Columbia and Alaska. 

Ticket Office 214 Montgomery Street 

GOODALL, PERKINS & CO., Agents, 
June 24, No. 10 Market street, San Francisco. 

DANCING ACADEMY, 

IN RED MEN'S BUILDING, 
No. 320 Post Street Opposite Union Sqnare. 

PROF. 0. A. LUNT respectfully announces that his new Academy, No. 320 Post 
street, is now open for Juvenile and Evening Classes. Office Hours, for Terms, etc., 
10 a.m. to 12 M., and 1 to 5 p.m. Oct. 22. 

ZEITSKA INSTITUTE, 

NO. 922 POST STREET. 

Day and Boarding School for Yonnjr Ladies and Children. 
KINDERGARTEN. Next Term will commence July 24th. To secure admis- 
sion for boarding pupils, applications should be made as ear] v as possible. 
May 13. MADAME B. ZEITSKA, AM., Principal. 



MRS. JULIA MELVILLE-SNYDER, 

613 Mason Street, between Bush and Sutter. 
rocal Mnslc for Opera, Concert or Parlor. Piano and 

Elocution. Dramatic Elocution and Voice Culture Specialties. [April 29. 



July 15, 1882. 



CALIFORNIA ADVERTISER. 



19 



THE FOURTEENTH OF JULT. 

To blue eyed Frano© bcwm the sea 

Columbia greeting t*'ii.ir*. 
And in the cause of Liberty 

A sister's hand extends. 
The festival* of Freedom make 

All hearts as kindred feel. 
Thus 'tis we, also, celebrate 

The fall of the Bastile. 
It is but ten short days ago 

Since we revived our past. 
And, France, we well remember how 

Thy lot with <turs was cast. 
When bravely, in those old-time wars, 

Like brethren, side by side. 
The Lilies with the Stripes and Stars 

For freedom fought and died. 
Fair France, we never ehall forget 

Thy aid in those dark days; 
Our Washington, thy Lafayette, 

We crown with equal bays. 
Our hearts shall throb to suit thy mood— 

We'll laugh when thou art glad, 
And, as a loving sister should. 

We'll weep when thou art sad. 
San Francisco, July 14. 1882. 

FASHION'S VOICE. 

What shall my theme be to-day? Let me see: I think I will deal in 
generalities, rather than tie myself down to any particular department ; 
and, so tint it be dress in some form, my lady triends will not make one 
little murmur of discontent. 

Among the Summer fabrics which just now claim our particular atten- 
tion are some novelties in the shape of striped velvet. The stripe is of 
the narrowest, and the material is light. A dress made of this, as a whole, 
is very lovely, though it is more generally combined with other materials, 
and is more especially adapted for young ladies' wear. Another inno- 
vation is cashmere trimmings, with glints of gold thread sparkling 
throughout. Those ladies who have old cashmere shawls too blase for 
use may cut them up to advantage, and lay them on the skirts of their 
dresses. For example, a black silk skirt, or any dark color chosen, may 
be made with box pleats reaching from the waist ; bands of the cashmere 
may be placed on each pleat, and sewed on with the finest gold thread, or 
even with gold beads, very small, at short intervals from each other. The 
basque should have bretelles to match — that is, bands placed round the 
neck and continued to the edge, about two inches on either Bide of the 
buttons, and then, of course, the cuffs match the whole. The effect is 
very rich and odd looking for those who do not wish to dress like the 
whole city; for, unfortunately, when a novel caprice is introduced every 
woman has it, and by and by the entire female community come out like 
a band of sisters who have bought certain goods wholesale. For instance, 
last month almost everybody had a ruby vehet suit, and now it is navy 
or cadet blue. Chaeuneu son (/out. The hair-striped velvet, by the way, 
makes an admirable bodice with long points, to wear over a light silk 
skirt, or white, for evening indoor wear. Vests and chemisettes are very 
much used at present. Thus an embroidered chemisette lined with light 
silk is most effective with a dark dress, which must be cut low, and the 
chemisette removed. Should the wearer wish to appear in demi toilette, 
lace may be substituted for embroidery with effect. 

Flounces being so fashionable, it is a pretty idea to have the edges 
pinked instead of hemmed. A skirt having four or 6ve flounces coming 
np to the waist, simply pinked out, with a basque falling over the last 
flounce, also pinked, is a simple and charming mode of making a young 
lady's dress, but the material must be silk or cloth. Young girls look 
much better in simple attire, divested of a heavy mass of trimming, which 
should be more wisely left to their mothers. As it is, the girl of the pe- 
riod seems to aim at loading down her garments with passmenterie, etc., 
while her mother apes the simplicity that should be seen in her daughter's 
toilette, both forgetting that they are doing the greatest detriment to their 
respective ages. When I see mother and daughter exchanging styles in 
this way I always wish to present them with the little couplet : 
" Oh, wad some Power the giftie gie us 
To see oursel's as ithers see us !" 
For demi toilette, bonnets are mure in favor than hats. They are small, 
and show off the chignon, which should be exquisitely dressed, and the 
ornamentation of these is simply a tuft of feather tips, or a apray of flow- 
ers. A capote of finely beaded lace thus ornamented is elegant, and re- 
member that the strings must be very wide, well tied close to the left ear 
in a large bow, and fastened by a pretty pin or fancy clasp, or a flower 
may be pinned in the center ol the bow. Black lace capotes are another 
variety. 

Fancy braid hats seem popular in Paris and London. The trimming 
for Buch is altogether feather — long, drooping plumes, which commence 
in front and are carried round the crown, falling over the back hair. I 
saw a hat of fancy braid, with an immense feather drooping over the aide, 
while sitting on the front, with her head nestled down upon her neck, 
waa an entire bird, large enough to extend tail and piniona over to the 
back. She looked mighty cosy, and appeared to be hatching, but the egga 
were not revealed to view. Another hat had a young rooater covering up 
the crown, which was low. I have no doubt that a neat of eggs will be 
the next departure, which I will faithfully chronicle when I see it. 

Jewelry is very elegant nowadays, slim and refined looking. The pon- 
derous bracelets heretofore worn have given way to thin, round circles of 
reddish-colored gold, which are fastened by a padlock, locked with a fancy 
key. Some have hearta, with a key, in lieu, and it is well to lock up the 
heart in this depraved age, ladies fair, take notice. Rings, with small 
charms attached, are in high favor. For those who lack natural charms, 
it is not a bad idea to place golden ones upon some fingers, and, as a rule, 
these have more effect in the market of Hymen, where fashion ia as con- 
servative as in dreas. With which remarks I will say au revoir. 

Silveb Pen. 



A prominent physician, who has the habit of looking below the sur- 
face when he is called in cases of illness, and who does not prescribe until, 
by the most careful diagnosis, he has made himself acquainted with all 
the symptoms of an ailment, said, in conversation the other day, that 
when the trouble is with the Htomach lie generally asks what brand of 
baking powder is in use by the tamily. If he is not satUfied with it, he 
does nut hesitate to say: " You bad better throw this sort out of doors 
and take the New England" Physicians have not much occasion to visit 
families professionally where the New England Baking Powder is used. 

The Twenty-ninth Annual Fair of the State Agricultural Society 
of California will open at Sacramento on the 11th of next September, 
and close on the lb'th. The exhibition will, as usual, include live stock, 
machinery and mechanical inventions, textile fabrics, agricultural pro- 
ducts, horticultural products, fine arts, and a variety of other attractions. 
Over $20,000 has been appropriated for premiums, and an endeavor will 
be made to make this year's fair an unusually successful one. 

Messrs. James M. Litchfield & Co., merchant tailors, of 415 Mont- 
gomery street, are now prepared to apparel their customers in well-made 
garments cut out of the very best quality of cloths. Messrs. Litchfield 
& Co. have on hand a large and well-selected stock of all the latest and 
most unique novelties in gents' furnishing good-*, and there ia no article in 
a gentleman's wardrobe which they cannot supply the best quality of. 

"The Great Burlington Route," via the Chicago, Burlington and 
Quincy Railroad, continues to hold its position in popular favor as the 
most comfortable transcontinental line of travel. Tourists from Australia 
almost invariably travel by this route, and all speak of it in terms of the 
highest praise. Mr. McKay, the genial Agent, is a perfect encyclopedia 
of useful knowledge, and is as courteous as he is well informed. 

The Neptune and Mermaid Swimming Baths, foot of Hyde and 
Larkin streets, North Beach, are always kept in a state of delightful 
cleanliness, and are so handy to reach that every one should patronize 
them. 

The Diamond Dyes always do more than they claim to do. Color 
over that old dreas. It will look like new. Only 10 cents. 

Ladies by using German Corn Remover, can wear "glove-titting " boots 
with ease and comfort. 

STATEMENT 

OF.... 

THE NEVADA BANK OF SAN FRANCISCO, 

Ou tbe Morning of July 1, 1882, in compliance Willi tbe 
laws ol the State ol California: 

ASSETS. 

Bank premises $500,000 00 

Otherreal estate 48,663 20 

United States bonds $3,000,000 00 

Miscellaneous bonds 108,406 20 

3,108,406 20 

Loans on real estate 142,640 39 

Loans on stocks and bonds 390,584 06 

Loans on warrants 32,693 46 

Loans on other security (grain, etc.) 1,165,697 01 

Loans on personal security 1,045,465 82 

2,766,981 84 

Due Irom banks and bankers 5,534,884 95 

Cashonhand 915,415 00 

Bullion and other cash items 1,044,607 49 

1,959,922 55 

40,167 47 

$13,965,029 81 

LIABILITIES. ~ 

Capital paid in coin $3,000,000 00 

Reservelund 4,000,000 00 

7,000,000 00 

Due depositors and payable on demand 4,474,046 10 

Due banks and bankers 1,794,048 43 

6.268,094 53 

Undivided profits 596,187 17 

Apportioned lor taxes 76,858 26 

Other liabilities 23,889 85 

$13,965,029 81 

State of California, County ol San Francisco, ss.— George L. Brander, Vice- 
President, and J. S. Angus, Cashier, ol the Nevada Bank ol San Francisco, being 
each and severally duly swom, each lor himsell, deposes and says that the foregoing 
statement is true to the best ol his knowledge and Debet. 

(Signed) O. L. BRANDER, Vice-President. 

J. S. Angus, Cashier. 
Subscribed and Bworn to before me this 11th day ol July, 1882. 

(Signed) J. H. BLOOD, Notary Public. 

State of California, County ol San Francisco, ss.— George L. Brander, Vice- 
President, and J. S. Angus, Cashier, of the Nevada Bank ol San Francisco, being 
each and severally duly sworn, each for himsell, deposes and says that the amount 
of Capital actually paid into such corporation is Three Million Dollars ($3,000,000) in 
United States Gold Coin. __ _ 

(Signed) GEO. L. BRANDER, Vice-President. 

J. S. ANGUS, Cashier. 
Subscribed and sworn to before me this 11th day of July, 1882. 
(July 15) (Signed) J. H. BLOOD, Notary Public. 

C OOS BAY COA L. 

The Cleanest and Cheapest. 

No Soot! No Dirt! 

The Best Coal for Domestic Use ! 

All Coal Dealers Keep It ! 

[May 27.] 



20 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



July ]5, 1882. 



^ »^, -Oiwwmm* nnw. 




COMMENTS ON FOREIGN AFFAIRS. 

We present above a map Bbowing location of the principal fortifi- 
cations of Alexandria, and the positions of the British men-of-war during 
the most important period of the bombardment. 

A Herald telegram, dated on board the United Scates steamship Quen- 
nebaug, says: "Everybody on the American ships were much disap- 
pointed at the inaction of the English Bbips yesterday. They say that 
Americans would have done the work in half the time." With much 
pride we reprint this dispatch from yesterday's papers. Comment upon 
it would be BUperflous. It tells its own story. It is too bad that the 
"American Admiral," with his brace of canal boats, wasn't given an op- 
portunity to exhibit his might and valor to the Egyptian gunners. He 
said the other day that if he was hit he would return the fire. The reason 
he wasn't bit was that bis engines were accidentally reversed just before 
tbe firing began, and the Egyptian gunB haven't a range of fifteen miles. 
To make up for this, however, we are told, in rather singular language, 
that "the American Admiral performed an act on Tuesday. He steamed 
around, and his men cheered each ship in succession. " Bully for the 
"American Admiral !" But the forts had just been silenced. 

There is much hostile comment upon the instructions sent by Glad- 
stone's Government to Admiral Seymour — and very properly, too. Such 
feeble and almost Bervile orders were never before issued to an English 
commander. There is consolation in tbe fact, however, that Seymour 
paid very little attention to them. He was told to be careful not to dis- 
mantle the forts or injure the guns; but he has knocked the former to 
smithereens, and has blown up the latter with dynamite. He was told to 
pat the Khedive on tbe back, or, if that functionary couldn't be found, 
to " act in concert with any native authority in Alexandria." He let the 
Khedive take care of himself, and blew Arabi Pasha — who was the only 
other native authority — into the interior. He was told to invite the co- 
operation of other European men-of-war. He invited them to get out of 
harm's way, and they promptly did so. Gladstone ought to bury himself, 
and plant John Bright as a headstone for his grave. 

The fleet has done its work, and the fight henceforth will be left to tbe 
military. There can be no doubt about the result, but the struggle will 
be an interesting one from several points of view. The employment of the 
British Indian troops will be a novel feature of European warfare, and 
the experiment will he anxiously watched by military men the whole world 
over. Should it prove a success, it will cause jEngland to be recognized 
as formidable a military Power as Germany, Russia, or France. With 
India's uncounted millions to draw upon, England can overrun the world 
with bayonets. A still more important feature of the war involves the 
ultimate fate of Egypt. On this head there is only one thing certain so 
far, and that is that England will insist upon having complete control of 
the Suez Canal. Whether she will # temporarily occupy the country, es- 
tablish a permanent protectorate over it, or absolutely annex it to her 
Empire, are questions which cannot yet be answered. 

The action of Arabi in throwing open the jails, letting loose the crimi- 
nals and encouraging the Bedouins to aid in the sack and pillage of Alex- 
andria, is abundant proof of the sort of " patriot" he is, and will alienate 
from him the modicum of sympathy which he might otherwise have en- 
joyed. He can no longer claim to be a civilized soldier, or a man possess- 
ing feelings of humanity. It is a pretty patriot who will wantonly and 
vengefully destroy and plunder the finest and most historical city of his 
country. Even the enemy respected the grand old town. Admiral Sey- 
mour could have blown it to fragments, but when his ironclads were roll- 
ing in a heavy sea he went so far as to cease firing at tbe forts, lest his 
shot might fly high and injure the city. More than this. By last ad- 
vices, he is dropping shells among the flaming ruins in order to drive out 
Arabi's pillagers and incendiaries. 

The Repression Act having become at last a law, it is intended that it 
shall be "proclaimed" in no fewer than thirteen Irish counties. Its 
provisions are severe, but they are necessary to meet the emergency. The 
Bill will doubtless make things hot for the United Order of Hedgerow 
Assassins, but then they don't exactly deserve to be left out in the cold, 
as it were. By the way, we notice that Mr. Crowe, of Peoria, is organiz- 
ing a Society of Iriph Americans for the avowed purpose of " blowing up 
the British." Mr. Crowe has acquired fame as a clever concoctor of 
infernal machines. Most Americans would like to see him sample one 
of his own manufacture. 



Bismarck's spasmodic appearances in public are always marked by an 
increased circulation of the pithy sayings for which he is celebrated. The 
latest of these dicta is as follows. Hie description of Mr. Gladstone as 
"his colleague" having been called in question, Bismarck replied: "We 
really are colleagues. I grow trees and he fells them." Of a different 
quality is an older Baying of the Prince's, which is revived by the Cologne 
Gazette in an article on the Egyptian question. "The Eastern question," 
so runs this apophthegm, "must be settled not on the salt-sea flood, but 
on the broad earth." This view of the case is not confined to Bismarck, 
but has been gaining adherents for some time past both in Germany and 
Austria. It has been preached with great ability and persistency by the 
well-known Austrian publicist, Lorenz von Stein. According to him, the 
lordship of the Mediterranean always ultimately belongs, not to the 
Powers which can command the sea, but to those who can command the 
land. The dominion over its waters appertains to the master of its 
shoreB. There is something very attractive to the ambition of the two 
allied Empires in a theory which promises them, by the pressure they can 
bring to bear upon Turkey, the control of half the Mediterranean. 

" ALBION. ' 

So much has been said up to the present time regarding tbe " Albion 
mine," its management and its prospects, and as there seems to be so 
many conflicting statements regarding the same as an unproducing prop- 
erty, we some days ago concluded to obtain such facte in the premises that 
our readers could depend upon. To that end we have selected a compe- 
tent correspondent in Eureka, who is instructed to examine into the sub- 
ject and advise us weekly of all matters pertaining to the mines of that 
district, in which our mining cummunity are interested. The first will be 
the Albion, its past history, its present condition and future prospects, 
with fair comments upon its management. The " Richmond," " Eureka 
Con." and other leading mines of Eureka, will also receive our attention 
in due time. In our reviews of each and all of them we shall not hesitate 
to praise where it may be deserved and denounce where we can see reasons 
for doing so. The Albion mining property joins the Richmond mine on 
the west, and the Eureka Con. joins the Richmond on the east. The 
Albion property has a known width between " quartzite and Bhale " 
(hanging and footwalls) of about 800 feet and a length on the ledge of 
4,500 feet. The ground that has been in dispute, and over which litiga- 
tion has been going on for the last three years, is about 650 feet along the 
ledge by its entire width {between hanging and footwalls). This piece of 
ground joins the Richmond's west end line, and it is along this line that 
so many thousands of tons of rich ore have been taken by the Richmond 
company in the past two or three years. These rich ore bodies have been 
worked up to and over the Albion east end line B0 feet or more before the 
Richmond was enjoined from going further (pending litigation), and it is 
this latter ore body that the Albion company are about to extract (the 
ground being theirs by the late decision of the Courts), and which has 
occasioned so mnch discussion as to its extent and value. 

Our correspondent says: " The statements made by the Albion manage- 
ment at Eureka as to the extent of this particular ore body (known as 
ore body B) has not been exaggerated in the least ; if anything, the amount 
of ore in sight to-day (July 3d) exceeds the amount that was claimed to 
be in sight June 21st. The ore body in sight, it is safe to say, now measures 
120 feet long, 40 feet wide and 50 feet high— say 18,000 tons. This is 
fairly in sight. Its value I arrive at by the following facts: 297 car-loads 
were taken from the same while cutting away for timber sets, and the 
openings carefully sampled in forty different places. The average value 
of this ore was: silver, $45.50; gold, $14, and lead, 344%. The cost of 
extracting this ore cannot exceed $4 per ton ; hauling, $2.50 ; reduction, 
$11; total, $17.50. Making the proper deductions for loss, etc., this ore 
body Bhould net at least $35 per ton, and it is claimed by many experts 
who have of late visited the property that it will net the company, when 
they work their own ores (which will be done as soon as they can procure 
a furnace), at least $45 per ton. 

The last ore taken from this ore body by the Richmond Company (one of 
late date) paid $85 per ton, by their own statements before Judge Reves in a 
late contempt case. Independent of the ore body B just mentioned, a 
very extensive and valuable body of ore exists in the Albion mine, about 
100 feet below ore body B and 80 feet south of same. This is known aa 
the "Cave," and-it is daily increasing in size and value as it is being ex- 
plored. Again, the Albion has opened up and is now exploring an ore 
body 40 feet above ore body B and 150 feet south of same. This is a very 
promising development, and the ore of high grade. A number of assays 
taken from this part of the mine shows a value of about $60 gold and 
silver, and over 50 per cent lead. All these ore bodies are so connected 
by ehutes and outlets that after the ore is mined it is not handled again 
until it reaches the ore bins at the surface. So far as the ore bodies in 
the Albion mine are concerned, they are certainly extensive and rich at 
the present writing, and every department in and around the mine de- 
notes careful attention, with convenient and economical methods for 
mining and handling ore." Our next will be devoted to the past compli- 
cations with the Richmond Mining Company, and the reasons therefor. 

It Is well known that the News Letter is no admirer of the com- 
munistic principles which the Chronicle is so fond of supporting, but at 
tbe same time we can fairly compliment that sheet upon its account of 
the bombardment of Alexandria, contained in its columns last Wednes- 
day. It was complete, accurate, interesting and instructive, and was 
derived from reliable sources, which our other dailies could not command. 
The expense must have been enormous, but this feature was evidently 
disregarded by the publishers. Journalism of this sort merits praise and 
disarms prejudice. __^_ 

Cholera Morbus. — That awful scourge, which is almost epidemic, has 
been traced in many instances by prominent physicians to the use of 
baking powders compounded with ammonia, starch and alum. Be warned 
in tires, and insist upon your grocer furnishing you with New England 
Bnking Powder. 

Implacable : " If I have ever used any unkind words, Hannah," said 
Mr. Smiley, reflectively, "I take them all back." " Yes, I suppose you 
want to use them ov er again," was the not very sooth ing reply. 

The Bodte Tunnel Company shipped $2,100, tbe result of five days 
run of their mill. Then the price of the Btock dropped 20c. a share. 





California ^dirrtteer. 




Vol. 33. 



SAN FBANOISOO, SATTIEDAY. JTJLT 22, 1882. 



NO. 2. 



G 



OLD BAR8—890@91O— Repined Silver— 114@11$ $ cent, discount 
Mexican Dollars, 8A(u 9 per cent. disc. nom. 



" Exchange on New York, 5c tf $100 premium ; On London Bank- 
an. 49jpL ; Commercial, 49j3<§49;M. Paris, sight, 5-12£ francs per 
dollar. Eastern Telegrams, 10c 



ter Price of Money here, t>@10 per cent, per year — bank rate. In the 
open market, 1(2)1$ per month. Demand light. On Bond Security, 
3@4^ per cent, per year on Call. 

tar Latest price of Sterling in Xew York, 486@4S9. 



PRICES OF LEADING STOCKS AND GOV. BONDS. 

San Francisco July 91, 1S89. 



Stocks and Bonds. Bid. 

BONDS. 

Cal. SWte Bonds, 6's,'57 .... L06 

S. F. Cttv * <-'<>. B'ds. fist, "58 Nom. 

S. F. City & Co, B'd9,7s ... Nom. 

Hontfrt Av. Bonds 37 

Dupont Street Bonds JO 

Sacramento Cttv Bonds 50 

Stockton City Bonds 305 

Yuba Count v Bonds 90 

Marysville City Bonds 90 

Santa Clara Co. Bonds 105 

Los Angeles County Bonds.; 106 

Los Angeles Citv Bonds | 110 

Vire'a & Truck ee R. R. Bds. 101 

' 110 



Asked Stocks and Bonds. 
mauRunm companies. 

— State Investment 

{Tom. Home Mutual . 

Nom. [Commercial 

45 Western 

60 , RAILROADS. 

521 C. P. R. R. Stock 

— C. P. R. K. Bonds.. . . 

100 iCity Railroad 

100 lOmnibus R. R 

107 N. B. and Mission R. R. 

110 'Sutter Street R. R 

!Geary Street R. R 

Central R. R. Co 

! Market Street R. R 

iClav Street Hill R. R ... 
[S. F. GaslightCo 

Oakland Gaslight Co ... 



103 
114 
125 
109 
107 
121 



Sac'to Gaslight Co 

Calilor*a Powder Co 

Giant Powder Co (new stck) 

Atlantic Giant Powder 

Gold and Stock TelefrTi Co 
S. V. W. W. Co. 's Stock... 
S. V. W. W. Co' Bonds.... 
Pacific Coast S. S. Co's Stock 
California Street R. R, 



122 
130 
126 
105 

92 
117 

95 

45 

96 

80 

98 

50 

Nom, 

Nom. 

63 

31 

52j 
115 
105 



64J 
113J 
119 

107 



128 
109 



100 

55 

Nom. 

Nom. 



34 



110 
67J 
65J 

114 

120 

110 



Nevada Co. N. G. R. R. Bdsl 

Oakland Citv Bonds I - 

Oregon B& N. Bonds, 6s.. 107 

S. P. R. R. Bonds ; 105 

S. 4s 120} 

BANKS. 

Bank of California (ex-div).. 168 

Pacific Bank(ex-div) 125 128 

First National (ex-div) 128 

lSSl'RANCK C0MFAX1E8. 

Union (ex-div) 123 125 

Fireman's Fund (ex-div) : 128 132 

California (ex-div) 125 126 

Pacific Rolling Mills, 116, 122J. Cala. Dry Dock, 55, 60. Safe Deposit Co., 45, 45J. 

Vulcan Powder, 66J, 67J. 

The activity in the various leading Powder stocks continues, and during 
the week quite an active business has been done in the California Electric 
Light Co. , showing a growing interest in that enterprise. In other things 
there is but little doing, as the firmness of holders retards operations. 
Money is almost useless, as there is no employment for it, even at nom- 
nal rates of interest. At the same time, collaterals are investigated with 
as much care as formerly. Andrew Baibd, 312 California st. 

Meteorological Summary, week ending 7:58 p. m., Thursday, July 
20th:— Highest barometer, 30.120— 17th ; lowest, 29.902— 14th ; average 
during the week, 30.035 ; maximum temperature, 66 — 16th ; minimum, 
54 — 14th, 15th and 20th ; average during the week, 58.4 ; highest relative 
humidity, 93 per cent. — 14th and 20th : lowest relative humidity, 60 per 
cent. — 16th ; average during the week, 81.7; prevailing direction of wind, 
west ; maximum hourly velocity of wind, 28 miles per hour, 20th ; aver- 
age weather during the week, fair ; rainfall during the week, .00 ; total 
rainfall, season of .1882-83, 0.00 inches. 



Latest from the Merchant's Exchange.— New York, July 21, 
1882. United States Bonds— 4s, 120}; 44s, U4| ; ex-5s, 102|; ex-6s, 1021. 
Sterling Exchange, 4 86@4 89. Pacific Mail, 471. Wheat, 120@125; West- 
ern Union, 90i. Hides, 24@24^. Wool — Spring, fine, 20 @ 32; Burry, 
15@20 ; Pulled, 20@45 ; Fall Clips, 15@18 ; Burry, 12@14. Lon- 
don, Julv 21.— Liverpool Wheat Market, 10s. ld.@10s.4d., Cal.; 10s. Id.® 
10s. 9d. Red Am. Spring. Bonds, 4s, 122; 44s, 116}; ex-6s, 103. Consols, 
99 7-16@984. Money, 99 7-16 ; aect., 99|. Silver, 61 J. 



Californians Abroad, July 1st, 1882.— Paris: Mrs. Dussol, Hotel 

Dominici. London: R. H. Brown, Judge French, W. R. Hall, Miss 

Klumpke. Geneva: Miss Houston, Mr. and Mrs. J. H. Maynard, Mrs. 

Elisha Cook and family, N. M. Smith. Heidelberg: Mrs. C. L. Simon. 

— Continental Gazette, Paris, France.- 



Coolie Exit — The British steamship Serapis returned to Hongkong 
on Wednesday last, cleared by Macondray & Co. She carried homeward 
upwards of 500 Chinese — a poverty-stricken lot and a good riddance. 

For New York via Panama. — The steamship Granada., for the Isth- 
mus, carried en route for New York : Barley, 2,334 ctls., new crop Chev- 
alier; salmon, 300 cs. ; wine, 38,000 gals., native grape, etc 



From Cardiff. — The British ship Grassendale has arrived, 138 days 
from Cardiff, with Coke, 1,533 tons ; Fire Brick, Steel Blooms, Old Iron, 
etc. 

London, July 21.— Latest Price of Consols, 99 7-16@99 1-S. 



MARRIOTT'S AEROPLANE COMPANY, 

For Navigating the Air. 

Office of the Aeroplane Company for Navigating the Air, 609 Mer- 
chant street. Office hours from 1 to 2 P.M. 

OrderH for IIh-tiuIh; in the Photo-Engraving; Process can 
now be executed at the "News Letter" Ofllce tor less than 
half the cost of Wood Engraving, and In one-hall the time. 
Remember, we f nrnlsh n hard metal Electrotype ready for 
the Press. 

TABLE OF CONTENTS. 

New Officers 2 

Notabilia 17 

ourselves 10 

Our London Letter 8 

Opium and Alcohol 9 

Pleasure's Wand 6 

Pacific Coast and Eastern Notea 14 

Remember or Forget (Poetry) 10 

Real Estate Transactions 16 

Regarding Civil Service Reform 2 

Royalty's Generous Impulse 2 

Sporting Items 7 

Society 3 

Sunbeams 12 

The World, the Flesh and theDevil 13 

The Bobolink (Poetry) 9 

Town Crier 11 

The Bulletin in Mask 10 

The Euphrates Route to India 2 



A Kiss for Sister (Poetry) 2 

A Magnificent Display 2 

A Curious Club '. 5 

"Albion" 1 

Another Trial 15 

Assessment Mines 20 

Biz 18 

Comments on Foreign Affairs 20 

Cradle, Altar and Tomb 15 

Credit where Credit is Due 19 

Cum Grano Salis 20 

Electricity, Etc 9 

Fashion's Voice 3 

Foreign Notes 10 

HowLordLydbrookCame to the Rescue 4 

Hymn of Pittsburg (Poetry) 5 

Happy Love (Poetry) ■ ■ ■ 8 

Local Notes r ...14 

Literary Notes 5 

Miscellaneous Items 19 



ALBION. 
The market continues sadly demoralized, prices having fallen as low 
as -SI 65 during the current week, a decline of some §200,000 since start- 
ing the furnaces on the 13th ultimo. The receipts have been some $10,- 
000, and an additional shipment is promised presently. Dealers appear 
unwilling to touch the stock, and an attempt to unload any considerable 
amount of shares would still further depreciate prices. The assessment 
now due, the present heavy indebtedness, and large sums required for 
current and contingent expenses, combined with the inability of owners 
to learn anything reliable or definite relative to those claims, about the 
enormous value of which they have heard so much for the past two to 
four years, thoroughly disgusts holders. Even creditors are becoming 
somewhat alarmed, and, unless better results are produced within the 
next three months, it is safe to predict that these claims will be in the 
hands of the Sheriff, instead of being manipulated by the insiders at an 
expense of §25,000 per month to shareholders. Superintendent Robinson 
remains in the city. We are not advised when he will return to his field 
of labor. 

Mr. James G. Bennett's yacht Namouna, having on board her dis- 
tinguished owner, a few male companions and a fair trinity of young la- 
dies, has arrived at Constantinople, and is to sail at once for Alexandria. 
It is said that Mr. Bennett wishes to test the strength of the Egyptian 
guns, and, with this object in view, propuses to offer his own cheek for a 
target. If the guns penetrate that, they ought to have riddled the 24- 
inch plates of the Inflexible. 

French Goods.— The French bark Gers, 177 days from Bordeaux, has 
arrived, bringing a valuable cargo of assorted French Goods. 



Grain Bags. — We note sales of 200,000 Calcutta Standards at 9.70, 
9.72i@9.75 July delivery; 20,000 Oakland Jute, July, 9.20. 



For Liverpool. — The ship Siren has 30,000 quarter-sacks Flour on 
board, for account of the Co-operative Millers' Association. 



September Wheat.— At the Produce Exchange Call 1,000 tons No. 1 
White sold for September delivery at SI 73 per cental. 



Flour for China. — The British steamer -Cairnsmuir, for Hongkong via 
Honolulu, carried 5,000 bbls. flour, all in cloth. 



Charter lor Wheat.— The latest grain charter, British ship Rock Ter- 
race, Cork, U. K., Havre or Antwerp, £2 19s. 



Ho for China! — The British steamer Cairnsmuir sailed on Thursday 
for Hongkong with 502 Chinese. 



For Sydney. — The German bark Astrea carries to Sydney 4,348 bbls. 
and 455 sks. wheat bran. 

JEntered at the Post-Ojflce at San Francisco, Cat., as Second-Class 
Matter. 



Printed and Published by the Proprietor, Frederick Marriott, 607 to 616 Merchant Street, San Francisco, California. 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER AND 



July 22, 1882. 



A KISS FOR SISTER. 
The artless innocence of childhood is delightful. The havoc that a 
very little girl created may be found in the simple verses that follow: 

She was a very little girl, The little girl came romping in, 

And as I bent and kissed her, And unto me she said, 

"There, that is for yourself," I said, " I div that tiss to sisser Bell, 
"And this ib for your sister." 'Ou left for her wiz me. 

Last night I called in a friendly way, " She tisRed me lots o 1 times, an' said : 
Some gay girl friends were there, When folkses 'ouldn't see, 

And laugh and jest went gaily round, I might div 'em to 'ou — dus' wait 
To banish weary care. 'Til on's alone wiz me!" 

I blushed and so did sister Bell, 

The gay girl friends, ah me! 
I wished the horrid things 

A thousand miles at sea. 
—St. Louis Criterion, 

THE EUPHRATES ROUTE TO INDIA 
Under tbe auspices of the National Club, Sir William Andrew, C. I. 
E., delivered a lecture on June 16th, on " The Euphrates Route to India," 
in connection with the Central Asian question. Sir William Andrew, in 
the course of his remarks, said the present position of affairs in Egypt 
forced once more to the front the necessity of having an alternative route 
to our Eastern possessions, even were the alternative an inferior one in 
every respect to that of the Suez Canal. Anything would be better than 
to leave our communications with the East at the mercy of such men as 
Arabi Pasha and his ignorant soldiers. He had but to sink a single ves- 
sel to obstruct the Canal, or to take a few spadesful of earth at certain 
portions of the embankment to reduce the magnificent water-way to the 
condition of a dry ditch. Sir Bartle Frere, referring to the lecture, said 
they had lately heard from the very highest authority in Parliament that 
engineers had represented to the Government that it woidd be very diffi- 
cult to make the Suez Canal impassable. But their statement probably 
had reference to the idea of draining the water out of che Canal, which, 
of course, would be a very difficult matter, as the Canal was on the same 
level as the Red Sea and the Mediterranean. 

It was a fact, however, that any large vessel by running aground could 
block tbe canal, and any small vessel placed in an advantageous position 
would be equally efficacious. He would ask people who had read papers 
of all shades of opinion, during the last fortnight, whether, in their opin- 
ion, the Suez Canal might not be closed to England any day in the week, 
and the danger had even advanced since Sir William had compiled his 
paper. Questions had been asked as to whether the projected railway 
through the Euphrates valley was likely to pay, but the same question 
was asked when the local steamboat companies were started, and were 
they not paying now? The suggestion was quite practical. The Turkish 
Government would one day have given 6 per cent, toward the expense of 
construction, and Lord Stratford de Redcliffe, than whom no man of the 
earlier part of this generation knew more about Turkey, was willing to 
take it up, but these times were past now. This was one of the undertak- 
ings which should commend itself to every one who wished for the con- 
tinuance of the Turkish Empire, and he (the speaker) thought the con- 
tinuance of the Turkish Empire was essential to the interests of 'England. 

A MAGNIFICENT DISPLAY. 

Just at the entrance, inside the elegant new depot building which 
the C. P. R. R. has erected on the Oakland wharf, Mr. I. W. Taber, the 
photographer of No. 8 Montgomery street, has fitted in some twelve large 
panels of photographs. These photographs embrace views of the Yosem- 
ite Valley, of the Cascades, of Mount Shasta, of San .Francisco — in- 
cluding some of our hotels, buildings and prominent men — and some mis- 
cellaneous views of choice bits of Californian scenery. The whole forms 
the most magnificent display of photographic results that has ever been 
seen outside of a photographic gallery or an Industrial Fair. The photo- 
graphs themselves are perfect specimens of the highest possibilities of the 
art by which they were produced, and reflect the greatest credit on the 
capacity of the artists who executed the work. To travelers, this collec- 
tion of gems — which it is hardly incorrect to designate an art gallery — is 
so interesting and instructive that it is no unusual thing for them to stop 
over one, and even two, boats, in order to properly examine the display 
and appreciate its merits. The new depot building is admittedly an ele- 
gant and completely arranged structure, and this collection is about the 
most appropriate ornament it possesses, presenting, as it does, to each visi- 
tor to our State, on the moment of landing from the overland train, a 
panorama of some of the most interesting of our attractions. 

ROYALTY'S GENEROUS IMPULSE. 
The Prince of Wales forwarded a telegram to the Mayor of Leicester 
respecting Charles Walkerdine, the man who attempted to shake hands 
with the Princess of Wales on the occasion of tbe Royal visit to Leicester 
on Whit- Monday, and who was sentenced to seven days' hard labor for 
being "drunk and disorderly." The telegram was as follows: " From the 
Prince of Wales, Great Yarmouth, to the Worshipful the Mayor of Lei- 
cester — Having seen in the newspapers that the man who ran up to our 
carriage has heen imprisoned with hard labor, I sincerely hope that you 
will remit the remainder of the sentence at my especial wish, in which 
the Princess fully concurs." On receipt of this message the Mayor pro- 
ceeded to Her Majesty's prison, and in the absence of the governor saw 
the chief warden, to whom he showed the telegram, and the man was set 
free. The governor, on his return a few minutes afterward, was greatly 
surprised to find the prisoner gone, the release, of course, being wholly 
irregular. He at onue took steps to inform the Home Secretary of what 
had occurred, and later in the day the necessary order for the prisoner's 
pardon was forwarded from the Home Office, thus giving legal force to 
the generous desire of the Prince and Princess. 



No Government was probably ever beset with so many difficulties — 
Parliamentary, domestic and foreign— and it is only the gigantic reputa- 
tion of Mr. Gladstone that keeps it together. If he were withdrawn, it 
would tumble to pieces in a week. 



NEW OFFICERS. 

At the annual meeting of the Central Railroad Company, the fol- 
lowing Board of Directors were elected for the ensuing year : S. C. Bige- 
low, A. W. Bowman, A. J. Gunnison, T. R. Hayes, Charles Main, C. P. 
Le Breton, G. W. Prescott, Joseph Rosenberg. E. H. Winchester. Sub- 
sequently tbe Board organized by electing S. C. Bigelow, President ; 
Charles Main, Vice-President ; A. J. Gunnison, Treasurer; 0. P. Le 
Breton, Secretary. 

The Directors of the California Central Railway, San Joaquin Division, 
elected at the annual meeting of stockholders, have organized as follows : 
W. W. Walker, President ; Lyman Bridges First "Vice-President, Chief 
Engineer and General Superintendent ; A. H. Washburn, Second Vice- 
President ; P. W. Johnson, Secretary and Treasurer; Robert Turner, 
Samuel Miller, J. H. Kinkead, R. P. Layton, W. L. French, Directors. 

The Directors of the Yosemite Division of the same road have orga- 
nized as follows: W. W. Walker, President ; Lyman Bridges, First Vice- 
President, Chief Engineer and General Superintendent ; A. H. Wash- 
burn, Second Vice-President ; P. W. Johnson, Secretary and Treasurer ; 
H. P. Stanwood, Samuel Miller and J. H. Kinkead, Directors. 

The Directors of the Mountain Division of the same road are the same 
ae the San Joaquin Division. Francis Bridges was elected Assistant 
Chief Engineer and Assistant General Superintendent for each division. 

REGARDING CIVIL SERVICE REFORM. 

How debauching and demoralizing the spoils system, under which 
our Civil Service is at present worked, is, may be judged from the follow- 
ing two advertisements which we take from the columns of the Washing- 
ton Republican, the organ of the spoilsman's administration: 
dj» 1 (^O— A lady with eood indorsements will give S100 for a good, permanent 
«JD -*- \J v/ position in one of the departments. Address G. G. , Republican Office. 

WILL give $50 cash and 25 per cent, of silary as long as retained to any person 
procuring me a position under the Government. Address "Money," Re- 
publican Office. 

The offices of the Government have become a matter of commerce all 
around. The friendless must pay the hangers-on to get appointments, 
then they must be robbed by assessments, and then they must obey the 
orders of boss leaders or be dismissed. It is not surprising that the whole 
country, including the better elements of the Republican party, is in re- 
volt against the system which not merely tolerates but encourages this 
iniquity. 

Mme. Rive-King, the distinguished pianist, will give a farewell 
matinee recital at Piatt's Hall to-day, at 2 P. M. Mme. Rive-King came 
among us as a stranger, heralded by a great reputation, and she had to 
maintain that reputation. This is as trying an ordeal as an artiste can 
be called upon to pass through. This lady did pass through it with honor 
and credit. Our musical people expected great things, and they were not 
disappointed. Mme. Rive-King will, we have no doubt, be greeted 
with a full and appreciative house this afternoon. 

There is now on exhibition at Eugene F. Badgley's store, 205 Mont- 
gomery street, a magnificent piece of California handicraft in the shape 
of a punch bowl worked out of gold and silver and other minerals found 
in California, Nevada and Oregon. The design is unique, tasteful, rich 
and massive. Two side pieces to hold goblets, and also a ladle are now in 
process of manufacture. The whole will form a present from Mr. D. 
Humbert, Jr., General Manager of Las Nueve Minas de Santa Maria 
Gold and Silver Mining Company, New York, to Governor Carlos R. 
Ortiz, of the State of Sonora, Mexico. 

The yearly report of the Boys' and Girls' Aid Society, an institution 
designed "to better the condition and elevate the tastes of the friendless 
and neglected boys and girls of this city," has just been published. It 
shows that this admirable institution is accomplishing a great deal of 
good, and that, if it had larger financial resources, it could accomplish 
still more good. We commend this institution to the attention of the 
philanthropic. 

Spring Valley Election.— At the annual meeting of the stockholders 
of the Spring Valley Water Company, held on Wednesday, the following 
officers and Trustees were elected to serve for the ensuing year: Charles 
Webb Howard, President ; Oliver Eldridge, Vice-President ; William 
Norris, Secretary, and Will Brooks, Assistant Secretary ; Trustees — 
Charles Webb Howard, Charles Mayne, Oliver Eldridge, George W. Gran- 
niss, A. B. Forbes, J. D. Fry, J. H. Dobinson. 



Bhe Knew Better. — Last week a lady came rushing into a store in 
Oakland with a can of baking powder, partially empty, in her band. 
"Look here!" she exclaimed to the store-keeper, " I want you to take 
this back and give me something I can depend on — the New England 
Baking Powder. This stuff of yours has made my children sick." The 
can returned was one of the kind sold with a gift as an inducement. The 
lady left that store with a can of New England Baking Powder in her 
hand, perfectly contented. Yet, the proprietors of the New England 
Baking Powder do not claim to be indorsed by the United States Gov- 
ernment, either by act of Congress or otherwise. 

PAINE'S HOUSEHOLD ART 

.... 1XD.... 

BRIC-A-BRAC ROOMS, 

35 GEARY STREET, 9*. E. 

I have purchased the stock and store lately owned by Mr. C. E. 
Locke, and am enabled to offer the choice collection of Floor and Wall 
Cabinets, Music Stands, Writing Desks, Tables, Eaaels, Pedestals, Fine 
Potteries, Porcelains, Bric-a-Brac, etc., in all of the NEWEST wares 
and of the CHOICEST designs, at EXCEEDINGLY LOW PRICES. 

H~£f Visitors are cordially invited to inspect the Show-rooms, and will be politely 
received, whether intending buyers or not. 

E. PAICTE, ----- S5 Geary Street 



.Inly 22, 1882. 



CALIFORNIA ADVKHTISKK 



8 



SOCIETY. 



July 20,1883: For thoae who admire variety in climate, 'Frisco 
must certainly b« * charminc plaoa t<> vi-.it, for in the last week no two 
days have bsen quit* alike. People say that the earthquakes which have 
recently vioited it are to blame, and thai wa are to have mors and plenty 
>>i Ibtu. If to. I expeut w« ihaU have a livtdy ihaidng op in 
as that h, 1 Ik'Iu-v,-, iy carded a* th< earthquake month of the year. But 
it h tinif enough to outlier ftbaul Ihom when that time comes, and mean- 
while I ihoold ad vine {romblen to be thankful we are Hpared the cyclones 
and tonudoM "f tl"- other aide oi the continent, and rest contented with 
the aodoJ tompttti tool now :uid then visit this place, of which one il, 1 
hear, looming in the distance. Hut attain I say, "sufficient to the day is 
the evil thereof." 

i-diiv moningj the rang little French Church on Bush street was 
well tilled I'v the friends of UndaffiO Regrnier, among whom I noticed 
quite a number of our elit* : , who assembled there to witness the nuptial 
aanmoniei between her and Mr. H. R. Hudson, of the Chronicle. 
Promptly »t half-past eleven the bridal party entered the edifice, the 
bridesmaid. Miss Lyons, and her groomsman, leading the procession. 
Then followed the bride and groom, arm-in-arm, and after them came 
the intimate friends of the bride, her sister, Mad'lle Truffert, and the 
bride's two witnesses, Mr. E. G. Lyons und Dr. De Vecchi. The cere- 
mony was performed by Father Robert, after which the usual signing 
t* Nik place in the sacristy, and theu all was done. A decided improve- 
ment, I tbui] k 'lit, on the tedious and wearisome marriage rites I have re- 
cently witnessed, at both St. Mary's and St. Ignatius. The bride was 
most becomingly and very appropriately attired in a mauve silk made en 
fr.ituc, a white lace scarf round her shoulders, and a pink bonnet of deli- 
cate shade. Miss Lyons was dressed in a greenish yellow (I do not know 
how else to describe it) gauze, made short; a hat, with feathers to match, 
completing her costume; and looked remarkably well. The happy pair 
were the recipient of some very handsome presents, and no end of good 
wishes for their health and happiness. They will spend their honeymoon 
at San Jose, and then settle down in a home of their own in this city. 

Excursionists in stage-coaches seem to be having a hard time of it, as 
news has just been received of another upsetting, on a mountain-side, of a 
coach containing a party composed of Messrs. Redding, Cole, Durbrow, 
Wilson and Smith, on pleasure thoughts intent. This time, happily, un- 
like the late accident near Santa Cruz, the vehicle remained on the grade, 
and nothing more serious occurred than the dislocating of shoulders to a 
couple of the young gentlemen, Harry Durbrow and Charles Cole, and a 
sprained ancle to young Redding. I say happily, as they had a miracu- 
lous escape from an awful death. Beu Burling, who came so near being 
a victim of the other disaster, has nearly recovered from his injuries, and 
has made his appearance again on Montgomery street. By the way, apro- 
pos of accidents, I hear that the display of flowers at Mr. Garrison's fu- 
neral, who lost his life by the railroad disaster near Long Branch, was 
something wonderful even for New York, there being no less than forty 
exquisite set pieces, besides other beautiful floral offerings. 

Mrs. Savage departed for Europe last week, intending to make a round 
of visits among relatives and friends there before returning again to 
America. She was the recipient of an elaborate dinner given in her honor 
by Mrs. Lemmen-Meyer, at her South Park residence, the Wednesday 
previous, when Mrs. Savage's health and bon voyage was drank with all 
honors. Mrs. Lemmen-Meyer herself anticipates a trip to Europe in the 
near future, going on a visit to her daughter, the recently wedded Mrs. 
Bartning, who is most pleasantly domiciled in the city of Hamburg. 

Another departure, which will be a real loss to society, is that of Mrs. 
J. C. Fall, who goes to see for herself what the new home and surround- 
ings of her daughter, Mrs. Steuart Taylor's, are like, in the far off Territory 
of Wyoming, and where, she says, she hopes to make the acquaintance of 
the noble red man, whether his visit be made in a peaceful guise or other- 
wise. Courageous woman ! Let us hope she will return with her scalp 
entire and her curiosity satisfied. 

The Heads have returned from Monterey, and the D. J. Staples from 
Etna Springs; and the Irving Scotts, Mrs. L. A. Boothe and Mrs. Requa 
are back fmm Southern California. Mr. and Mrs. Sam'l Wilson and their 
son Moii t ford arrived home from the East yesterday, and to-day's train 
brings Gen. Beale, on a brief visit to look after his sheep and wool in- 
terests before plunging into the Congressional campaign that he is anti- 
cipating in the East. 

The report that we were soon to have back with us again Captain 
Costar and bis beautiful wife is, I am sorry to say, quite set at rest by 
the announcement that he has been placed on the retired list, bo his ser- 
vices, in a military light, at least, are of no further possibility on this 
coast. Lieutenant Milton, of the Navy, and his wife, nee MissSteele, a 
niece of Willie Cunningham, left for the East yesterday. Lieutenant 
Milton has been attached to the Ranger for some time back. The usual 
run of Saturday and Sunday visitors continues at Monterey, and, in 
fact, at nearly all the Summer resorts. Among those at the Tamalpais 
last week were the Misses Lake and Mrs. Lebreton, the two young la- 
dieB having recently returned from Del Monte, which, I am told, they 
voted most awfully slow and stupid, but I don't see that San Rafael can 
be much of an improvement on it, if all that I bear be true. _ 

Amusements in town seem to be looking up a bit, as it is generally 
understood that the Olympic Club gathering to-morrow night will be 
gayer and better attended than usual of late. For to-morrow night, also, 
invitations are out for a "full-dress surprise" (I) party, to be given by 
Mrs. Gladwin at the Galindo Hotel, in Oakland, which the committee in 
charge are doing all they can to make a success. I include this in the 
gay items for town, as I have always regarded Oakland as a suburb of 
'Frisco, for which confession I expect to have my wool pulled the next 
time I visit that city of the oaks. 

I fear I was premature in congratulating our citizens not long since in 
so soon possessing a new place to visit within its limits. The Observatory 
on Telegraph Hill has been finished and opened to the public, but the 
projected railroad thither is, I hear, abandoned, as the promoters feared 
there was no money in it, and wisely gave it up in time. So the Observa- 
tory remains for those who dwell on the hill and thereabouts, or for others 
who are fonder of climbing steep grades on foot in gales of wind than 
the majority of 'Frisco's dwellers, among whom let me include Felix. 



Take the Autophone to the country, 
the latest airs. 



Ichi Ban, sole agent, has all 



FASHIONS VOICE. 

To-day being one ol gloom, with which my thoughts necesftarily corre- 
spond, and at such times feeling averse to discourse Hweet fanciea 
in blue and red, I propose to treat my lady friends to a symphony In 
black, whit h, as ;i dress nquflftlon, I think the most perfect of all toi- 
lettes under the sun; for you can never go astray in choosing a black gar- 
ment, which is as becoming to the dainty, pretty- com pi exioned girl on it 
is to the staid beauty of maturer years— and if you are not a beauty, 
black is the most effective color for concealing your plainness. Black Is 
not only beautiful at all times, either in its own sombre perfectness or re- 
lieved by blots of color, but it is a positive god-send to jwople who cannot 
afford a change of robes. One handsome black dress answers admirably 
for all occasions. You may wear it in the early morning, walk out in it, 
and when evening comes place carelessly a few bouquets here and there, 
or some suspicion of brilliant color in satin bows, or even a profusion of 
white lace, discriminately applied, and you have at onco a perfect lady's 
dress. Some people invest in one gorgeous dress of brown, green, or even 
ruby, and, lacking a change, those individuals are always known by that 
one unfortunate garment; but black relieves us of the necessity of constant 
change, and frees us from the invidious remarks of those who cannot 
count their dresses on their fingers. The black grenadines now so exquis- 
itely effected by satin and velvet reliefs are made positively nude of orna- 
mentation, their own intrinsic beauty being deemed sufficient without 
adjuncts. The modes of making such are various; plain skirts over silken 
petticoats, with a richly draped overskirt, caught together with handsome 
bows, is the most distanuuee, though another mode may be mentioned as 
charming — a skirt liued with very thin silk, and box-pleated in double 
pleats from the waist, with full paniers taken back and looped in two long 
ends reaching to the hem of the skirt, is an elegant conceit; and be it ob- 
served that when the material is rich in itself a preponderance of trim- 
ming is simply ridiculous, and in bad taste. Black net dresses for young 
ladies are made with three skirts, which may be picked up with roBes, 
gold fernB, or ribbon bows. For evening wear black silk dresses have the 
skirts very finely pleated, with rows of shirring at intervals throughout 
the entire skirt, over which a black velvet basque looks effective, and may 
be enlivened by steel buttons or frogs. 

For mourning, crape dresses shirred across the entire front breadth, and 
draped at the back with a plain basque, having a plastron of shirring let 
in square, back and front of the corsage, is de riguer. Another mode of 
making an elegant mourning robe is to have the black silk underskirt ef- 
fected by alternate knife pleatings of crape and heavy lace, while a crape 
overskirt, cut in points, falls plain over the top frill. The corsage must 
be pointed, having a corresponding garniture round the edge. 

The great and only Worth is particularly partial to black, therein 
showing his perfect taste. His dresses in black are generally formed in 
combinations of two or three fabrics, and have often a color introduced. 
One special novelty .is a black grenadine made over white moire", and 
trimmed with Spanish lace and moire" ribbon. Another original dress has 
a black satin skirt without flounces, with many festoons of thread lace, 
while the basque and drapery are of the black brocaded China crape. 
The festoons are made of two rows of gathered lace that is three inches 
wide. These are near the foot on the front and side breadthB, while the 
back has three breadths of satin nearly a yard deep, falling in box plaits 
to the foot. The brocaded crape is draped as paniers, and edged with 
lace. There are also many rows of jet passementerie down the front. 
Plain sewing silk grenadine forma the deep plaits of another black dress, 
and this has bands of Spanish lace or open embroidery laid on before the 
plaits are pressed in. Above this is a black watered silk overskirt deeply 
pointed in front and forming a Watteau plait behind. Spanish lace 
grenadine and all-silk Spanish laceB are made up over terra cotta, bronze 
and orange- colored satins. 

If women considered and studied the science of dress, or rather of look- 
ing well in their dresse?, they would, as a rule, wear black. Certainly, for 
those of a certain age.it is the most rejuvenizing color that can be se- 
lected. Also in hats, while only one woman in twenty looks well in the 
violent shades that are so common, almost every one appears to advantage 
in sombre black. It is true the wide hats surmounted by plumes of black 
feathers are rather suggestive of a funeral, but then think of the effect 
when a pair of brilliant eyes glance up from beneath the overshadowed 
brim. 

Black lace scarfs are moat fashionable pinned into form with jet or gold- 
headed pins, and black Bilk hose are now an indisputable addition to a 
lady's toilet. On the whole, my word may be taken, ladies, that for per- 
fection of effect, there is nothing like black, and so I conclude my sym- 
phony. Silver Pen. 

The pretty cotton dresses have quite lost their charm of simplicity 
thiB year. They are like Lady Teazle when she became a woman of fash- 
ion—frilled, flounced, furbelowed, fluted and flooded with flowing lace. 
Many are not even recognizable as cottons. 



THE ftR EAT X IK I Xj 

MAMMOTH DISPLAY OF 



THREE HUNDRED CASES OP 

Men's and Boys' Straw Hats 

TO SELECT FROM. 

Amongst this Spring's Importations are some of the Nobbiest Styles 
of STRAW HATS FOK YOUNG MEN that have ever been offered 
in San Francisco. Strictly One Price. 

FLAVIN'S 
GREAT 

Corner of Kearny and Commercial Streets, S. F. 



I 2C Hi 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER AND 



July 22, 1882. 



HOW LORD LDYBROOK CAME TO THE RESCUE. 

Among other letters which Lord Ldybrook found at the Club on 
his return from a six months' yachting cruise, was one from his sister, 
Lady Julia Marchmont, containing the startling news that her daughter 
Eva had actually engaged herself to the second coachman. Lord Ldy- 
brook very rarely allowed anything to disturb Mb equanimity, but his 
sister's letter caused him genuine uneasiness. He knew that his niece 
was a willful, headstrong girl, with romantic notions, and a strong-minded 
contempt for conventionalities. Considerable sensation had been caused 
last season by a young lady of good family eloping with her father's groom, 
and Lord Ldybrook did not wish a niece of his to disgrace herself by 
a similar escapade. He considered his sister the silliest woman of his ac- 
quaintance, and as utterly devoid of tact and discretion as she was amia- 
ble, weak and indolent. He trembled to think of the risk of leaving his 
niece under the Bole control of her mother in such an emergency, and 
mindful of the promise he made to bis bosom friend, John Marchmont, 
on his death-bed, to befriend his children when he was gone, Lord Lyd- 
brook summoned sufficient energy to take the next train to Highnam 
Hall. 

Highnam Hall is in Hertfordshire, within two hours of London. By 
the time he arrived there, Lord Lydbrook had decided on his course of 
action, and had resumed his usual placid, imperturbable frame of mind. 
He had a long conversation with Lady Julia, whose complete helplessness 
convinced him of the necessity for his interference. It appeared that 
when Lady Julia and her family were in London last season, Miss Eva 
used to ride in the Park every morning, attended by the second coach- 
man as groom. The man was a good-looking young fellow, superior to 
his class both in manners and appearance, with some little education. 
His civility attracted the notice of his young mistress, who got in the 
habit of exchanging a few words with him during their rides. Some good- 
natured friend warned Lady Julia of the danger, real or imaginary, to 
which her daughter was exposed, and the anxious mother, by her injudi- 
cious remonstrances aud reproaches, succeeded in rousing Miss Eva's defi- 
ant temper. The groom was immediately dismissed with ignominy, and 
Miss Eva Marchmont, who probably had not thought much about him 
before, began to fancy she had a regard for him. The young man worked 
upon tbe girl's feelings, and at length persuaded her to listen to his ardent 
protestations of love and devotion, until she one day horrified her mother 
by announcing that she was engaged to him. Lady Julia left London in 
the middle of the season, in the hope of removing her daughter out of the 
man's reach, but the young fellow followed his lady love into the country, 
and was at present staying in the village. The girl seemed so determined 
to have her own way, and so indifferent to her mother's remonstrances, 
that Lady Julia had almost abandoned herself to despair, and talked in 
the most foolish manner of the possibility of a mrrriage actually taking 
place. 

Having learned all the details of the unfortunate affair, Lord Lyd- 
brook joined his young nephews and uieces at luncheon. Lady Julia had 
several children, all plain and uninteresting excepting Eva, whose face 
was decidedly intellectual, if not handsome. She was her uncle's favorite, 
perhaps because he was the only person who could manage her. But 
Lord Lydbrook owed this ascendancy rather to his tact and coolness 
than to the respect due to his age and relationship. Miss Eva's rebellious 
Bpirit and passionate temper made her resent the authority of her elders, 
and her uncle was perfectly alive to the delicate nature of the task which 
lay before him. 

Lord Lydbrook's manner was charming when his favorite niece made 
her appearance. The young lady had heard of her uncle's arrival, and 
was prepared to defy him, as she had done her mother and sisters. She 
entered the room with flushed cheeks and glistening eyes, ready to hold 
her own against all the uncles in the world. To her surprise, however, 
Lord Lydbrook greeted her affectionately, and paid her a flattering com- 
pliment. He even inquired after "Mr. Charles," and hoped to have the 
pleasure of making his acquaintance. There was no suspicion of sarcasm 
in her uncle's tone, so the girl was forced to believe his sincerity. The 
"Mr. Charles'* sounded contemptuous, but when she reflected that she 
herself did not know the surname of her lowly admirer, she could not ac- 
cuse her uncle of disrespect. Lord Lydbrook did not embarrass his 
niece by asking further questions, but proceeded to give an interesting 
account of his recent expedition, describing the places he had visited and 
the people he had seen in that inimitable vein of dry humor for which he 
was famous among his friends. 

After lunch, Lord Lydbrook lit a cigar and strolled leisurely across 
the park to the village. He called at the " Three Cups " inn and asked 
for "Mr. Charles." The young man looked very ill at ease when he saw 
the Peer. But when his Lordship politely said he had called on purpose 
to make his acquaintance, and offered him a cigar, " Mr. Charles" recov- 
ered himself a little. Lord Lydbrook ordered a bottle of wine to be 
brought into the coffee-room, and while Waiting for this refreshment, he 
had time to take stock of the young man's appearance. Mr. Charles was 
quite good-looking enough to turn the head of a young and impressionable 
girl, but there was an expression of low cunning on his face which con- 
vinced Lord Lydbrook that he was shrewd and unscrupulous — in short, 
a dangerous man to deal with. 

" Mr. CharleB " showed his wisdom by leaving his Lordship to explain 
the object of his visit. Most men in Lord Lydbrook's situation would 
have felt embarrassed, but the cool-headed Peer was quite unperturbed. 
He said, with charming frankness, that his niece's family could not pre- 
tend to be gratified at the choice she had made. On the other hand, it 
was impossible to ignore the fact that she was old enough to know her 
own mind. Her family objected very much to the young lady carrying 
on a clandestine love affair, and yet they were not prepared to recognize 
the engagement. Under these circumstances, Lord Lydbrook suggested 
that the best course would be for " Mr. Charle3 " to visit at the house as 
a friend of the family, and perhaps in time the engagement might be de- 
clared. Lord Lydbrook concluded by saying that Lady Julia would be 
delighted if " Mr. Charles" would dine at the Hall that evening. 

When Lord Lydbrook told his sister what he had done, her Ladyship 
nearly had a fit. The Peer was obliged to use all his influence to reconcile 
her to his project. Any other evening, protested poor Lady Julia, in a 
flood of tears, would not have mattered so much ; but to night, when Mr. 
and Mrs. Travers were dining at the house, and young Mr. Mapleton, 
who admired Eva bo, and would be such an excellent match! But Lord 
Lydbrook prevailed, as usual. Mr. and Mrs. Travels, he replied, were 



old and intimate friends, to whom everything could be explained, and he 
would make the necessary apologies to young Mapleton, if any should be 
needed. Lady Julia calmed down after awhile, and just before dinner 
was announced, when all the other guests had arrived, the astonished but- 
ler ushered in " Mr. Charles." 

Lord Lydbrook advanced to meet his guest with perfect affability. The 
poor young man looked so sheepish and awkward that his appearance was 
quite pitiable. All his good looks seemed to have vanished ; his face 
shone with soap, his hair glistened with pomatum, his clothes did not fit 
him, and hishands looked painfully large and red. Poor Lady Julia shud- 
dered as she gave him the tips of her fingers, and her daughters bowed 
and were fairly horror-stricken. " Mr. Charles'" arrival was a surprise 
to every one but Lord Lydbrook and Lady Julia, and especially to Eva. 
The poor girl was covered with confusion, and though she gallantly ral- 
lied and went and sat by her lover, it was evident to her uncle's keen eyes 
that she was as much shocked as any one. 

The dinner was like a dreadful nightmare to the hostess and her daugh- 
ters, whose worst anticipations were realized by "Mr. Charles " behavior. 
If he had only had the sense to keep silence, his awkward habit of putting 
his knife in his mouth, and the innumerable social solecisms he committed, 
might have escaped notice; but whether from extreme nervousness, or 
from the idea that he ought to assert himself, he persisted in talking loud- 
ly to every one, and every word he uttered was a flagrant offense against 
good taste and the Queen's English. Lord Lydbrook was in his wicked- 
est mood, and, to his sister's horror, amused himself by drawing out the 
unsophisticated guest. Affecting a deep interest in the young man's 
opinions on all subjects, his Lordship mercilessly caused him to betray 
his ignorance, his innate vulgarity, and his coarseness of mind with hid- 
eous distinctness. Flattered by the notice he received, "Mr. Charles" 
soon became offensively familiar, and as dinner proceeded showed symp- 
toms of intoxication. He grew quarrelsome and noisy, contradicted Lady 
Julia, let fall an oath (for which he had sense enough to apologize), and 
even snubbed Eva herself when she attempted to restrain him. The un- 
fortunate girl sat upon thorns the whole evening, and never felt so bit- 
terly humiliated in her life. But she was too proud and too loyal to de- 
sert her lover, and though inexpressibly shocked by the exhibition he was 
making of himself, she addressed her conversation to him and did her 
best to smooth matters over. Her uncle was so touched by her ardent 
distress, that he signaled to Lady Julia to lead the way to the drawing- 
room immediately after dinner. 

Lord Lydbrook did not allow "Mr. Charles" to join the ladies in the 
drawing-room ; in fact, the young man was not in a fit state for ladies' so- 
ciety. With some difficulty he persuaded him to leave the house, and 
sent him back to the Three Cups under the escort of one of the stable 
boys. The look of intense relief upon his niece's face when the other 
gentlemen entered the drawing-room alone, gave him strong hopes as to 
the success of bis experiment. 

But Lord Lydbrook was by no means easy in his mind next morning, 
when he awoke and reflected on what had passed. However upset his 
niece might have been at the conduct of her lover, she was tbe sort of girl 
who would revenge herself on her relatives, for the humiliation Bhe had 
suffered, by marrying the man in spite of everything. His lordship was 
therefore more disgusted than surprised when his valet brought him the 
news that the house was in a commotion, because Miss Eva had disap- 
peared, and was supposed to have run away in the night. 

Without losing a moment, Lord Lydbrook dressed himself, and rode 
down to the "Three Cups." He was very much relieved to find that 
"Mr. Charles "was still in bed and asleep, but his uneasiness revived 
when he recognized his niece's handwriting on a note addressed to the 
young man, which had been brought by one of the railway porters. If 
ever Lord Lydbrook felt inclined to violate the sanctity of a letter it was 
on that occasion. He restrained his first impulse, however, and carried 
the letter to "Mr. Charles" in person. The young man was sleeping 
heavily when Lord Lydbrook woke him, and put the missive in his hand. 
"Mr. Charles" was evidently dull of comprehension after the previous 
night's dissipation, for he read the letter once or twice with a very blank 
expression, and then handed it to Lord Lydbrook, and asked him, peevish- 
ly what the deuce it meant. The note ran thus : — 

"Miss Marchmont presents her compliments to 'Charles' and regrets she has mis- 
taken her feelings towards him. Miss Marchmont is sure ' Charles ' will agree with 
her that they had better not meet again. Miss Marchmont is leaving home for a long 
time, to stay with her sister, and trusts Charles will forget her, and encloses a bank- 
note for ten pounds." 

"What the does it mean? repeated the young man, using a very 

strong expletive, and eyeing Lord Lydbrook savagely." "It means, said 
my Lord quietly tearing the letter into shreds, and laying the bank-note 
on the bed, " that you have made a most confounded fool of yourself, and 
deserve to be thrashed for your impertinence. My niece has been obliged 
to leave home on purpose to avoid you, and if you ever attempt to annoy 
her again, or any of her family, I'll horsewhip you." — Truth. 

ENTERPRISE MILL AND BUILDING CO., 

Sawing-. Planing and Manufacturing—Doors, Sashes, Blinds and 

Mouldings—Turning-, Scroll and Jig Sawing— Counters, 

Bar and Store Fixtures. 

Finishing Work for Buildings on Hand and Made to Order. 

217 to 225 Spear SI., aud 218 to 226 Stewart St., S. F. 

The largest and oldest established niiH on the Pacific Coast. 
D. A. Macdoscald, Pres't. R. S. Falconer, Sec'y. W. N. Miller, Supt 
[March 26.] 

F. N. Neuval. W. S. Somervell. 

PACIFIC ASPHALTUM COMPANY. 

Established 1865. 

Proprietors of the Celebrated Corral de Piedra Asphaltum Mine, 

(San Louis Obispo County). 

Healers in Crude and Refined 

ASPHALTUM, FELT AND ROOFING MATERIAL. 

Prepared Asphaltum for Country Orders always on hand. Contractors for Side- 
walks, Roofs, Floors and General Asphaltum Work. All Work Guaranteed. 
Office and Depot, 420 Jackson. \ Branch Office, 422 Montgomery ,8.F. 



July 22, 1882. 



CALIFORNIA ADVERTISER 



OF PITTSBURG. 

My father was a mighty Vukmi ; 

I am Smith of the land and w« ; 
The cunning spirit of Tubal. Cain 

Came witli inv marrow to me. 
I think great thought*, strong-winged with ateel, 

I coin vast iron acta, 
And orb the iui|>al|iuble dreams of seers 

Into comely, lyric fact*. 
1 am Monarch of all the Forges, 

I have solved the riddle of fire, 
The Amen of Nature to cry of Man, 

Answers at my desire. 
I search with the subtle soul of flame 

The heart of the rocky Earth, 
And hot from my anvils the prophecies 

Of the miracle-years leap forth. 
I am swart with the soota of my furnace, 

I drip with the sweats of toil ; 
My fingers throttle the savage wastes, 

I tear the curse from the soil. 
I fling the bridges across the culfs 

^That bold us from the To-Be, 
And build the roads for l .he bannered march 

Of crowned humanity. —Richard Realf. 

LITERARY NOTES. 
^— The Prussian Government, always liberal in granting historians 
acceas to its archives, has now permitted the publication of the most au 
thcntii- materials for a very modern chapter of history. This iB a volume, 
edited by Von Poschinger and published by Hirzel, of Leipzig, contain- 
ing the confidential correspondence between Prince Bismarck and Count 
Manteuffel during the years 1851 and 1854, when the former was the 
Prussian representative at the German Diet at Frankfort, and the latter 
Minister of Foreign Affairs at Berlin. A second volume will carry the 
correspondence down to 1859. 

— The Publishers' Circular states: Mr. George H. Ellis, of Boston, 
U. S., will issue at once " Gems of the Orient," a volume of aphorisms 
and selections from the Hindoo, Chinese, Persian and Arabic literatures, 
edited by Rev. C. D. B. Mills, of Syracuse, New York, one of the few 
Americans who have achieved distinction in Oriental studies. The work 
will contain nearly eight hundred very carefully selected extracts in prose 
and verse, including many passages which have never before been put into 
English. 

•^— A new volume of poems from Mr. Longfellow, including all the 
lyrics that he wrote after the publication of "Ultima Thule," is pub- 
lished by Houghton, Mifflin & Co., and is called "In the Harbor: Ul- 
tima Thule, Part II.," a title chosen by Mr. Longfellow himself. The 
same publishers announce that Mrs. Ole Bull is writing a life of her hus- 
band, which they will issue in the autumn. 

— A literary treasure of singular appositeness, says the London Ath- 
BMBttm, has just turned up in the form of a preface, written by Thackeray 
for the second edition of his " Irish Sketch Book," but suppressed by the 
publishers as being too outspoken. The paper is said to be written in 
Thackeray's most vivacious and most characteristic style, and will soon 
be published in the Century magazine. 

— The first two numbers of the Breeder and Sportsman have made 
their appearance, and the paper is fairly launched upon the troubled sea 
of journalism. The style and appearance of the paper is good, and it 
contains a large quantity of well written matter relating to sporting and 
breeding affairs. The tone of the new journal is dignified, and its literary 
quality unquestionable. It is beyond question far ahead of any paper of 
its class ever published on this coast, and it deserves to succeed. 

-^— Uncle Sam's Weekly, a new publication, founded, its salutatory 
says, on the ruins of the Herald, has just made its appearance. What mis- 
sion it came to this world of sin upon, we do not know. Its editor exhib- 
its a good deal of selective talent. 

— Wilkie Collins is engaged in writing a new serial story, the publi- 
cation of which will begin at once. In this work the question of vivisec- 
tion is placed in a new point of view, by tracing the effect of the ha- 
bitual practice of cruelty on human character. 

— Mr. Thomas Hughes is engaged upon a memoir of the late Daniel 
Macmillan, who, with his younger brother, the present much respected 
head of the house, founded the firm of Macmillan & Co. 

— A complete edition of the prose works of the Italian poet, Giosue 
Carducci, is announced. 

A CURIOUS CLUB. 
Some members of Parliament who have been to America talk of 
establishing a counterpart of the " State in Schuylkill " Club of Phila- 
delphia. This is an eccentric institution 150 years old. Among its pecu- 
liarities one is that when the members and guests dine together the at- 
tendance of servants is absolutely dispensed with. A caterer is selected 
from among the members, and under his direction the dinner is prepared 
by the members and guests. They also lay the cloth, wait on themselves 
at dinner, and wash up the dishes afterward. The Club is held in high 
repute, chiefly on account of its age. It is among its records that George 
Washington in America once dined there. It is certain that only the 
other day President Arthur was a guest, and with sleeves rolled up took 
his part in peeling the potatoes, and subsequently helped to wipe the 
dishes, which the Attorney-General and two Chief Justices had washed. 
This, of course, casts a halo of respectability over the Club. To the snob- 
bish mind, however, there is an element of vulgarity in the idea, and 
neither the eccentricity nor the fun that may arise out of it will make it 
popular with that class who think it degradation to black one's own boots 
or brush one's coa t. 

Just opened, choice Scarfs, Cravats and Hosiery, at Carmany's Shirt 
Store, 25 Kearny street. 



BANKS. 



THE BANK OF CALIFORNIA, SAN FRANCISCO. 

Capital f3.000.000. 

WM. ALVORD President. 

THOMAS BROWN, Cashier | B. niKKAV, Jr., Aaa't Caahler 

Agents: 

New York, Agency of the Bank of Calfomla ; Boston, Tremont National Bank , 
Chicago, Union National Bank ; St. Louis, Boatman's Saving Bank ; Now Zealand, 
tho Bank of Now Zealand. Corrcupondeiil in London, Messrs. N. M. Rothschild Ac 
Suns. Correspondents In India, China, Japan and Australia, the Oriental Bank 0or- 
po ration. 

The Bank has Agencies at Virginia City, and Correspondents In all the princi- 
pal Mining District* and Interior Towns of the Pacific Coast. 

Letters of Credit issued, available in all parts of tho world. Draw direct on Lon- 
don, Dublin, Paris, Berlin, Bremen, Hamburg, Frankfort-on-tho-Maln, Antwerp, 
Amsterdam, St. Petersburgh, Copenhagen, Stockholm, Christiana, Locarno, Mel- 
bourne, Sydney, Auckland, Hongkong, Shanghai, Yokohama. Nov. 4. 

BANK OF BRITISH COLUMBIA. 

Incorporated by Royal Charter.— -Capital paM up, 81,800,- 
000, with power to increase to 810,000,000. Southeast corner California and San- 
some streets. Head Office— 28 Cornhill, London. Branches— Portland, Oregon; Vic- 
toria, New Westminster and Cariboo, British Columbia. 

riiis Bank transacts a General Banking Business. Accounts opened subject to Check 
and Special Deposits received. Commercial Credits granted available in al parte of 
the world. Approved Bills discounted and advances made on good collateral security. 
DrawB direct at current rates upon Its Head Office and Branches, and upon its Agents 
as follows : 

New York, Chicago and Canada — Bank of Montreal; Liverpool — North and South 
Wales Bank ; Scotland —British Linen Company ; Ireland — Bank of Ireland ; Mex- 
ico and South America — London Bank of Mexico and South America ; China and 
Japan— Chartered Bank of India, Australia and China, and Oriental Bank ; Australia 
and New Zealand— Bank of Australasia, Commercial Banking Company of Sydney, 
English, Scottish and Australian Chartered Bank, and Colonial Bank, Panama. 

May 18. FREDERICK TOWNSKND, Manager. 

FIRST NATIONAL GOLD BANK OF SAN FRANCISCO, CAL. 

Paid up Capital 81,500,000, Gold. President, R. C. Wool- 
worth Vice-President, D. Callaghan ; Cashier, E. D. Morgan. 

Directors :— R. C. Woolworth, D. Callaghan, C. G. Hooker, George A. Low, Peter 
Donahue ,4saac Wormser, James Phelan, James Motfltt, N. Van Bergen. 

Co 8.EBSP0SDKST8— London : Baring Bros. & Co. Bank of Montreal, No. Biruhin 
Lane, Lombard street. Dublin : Provincial Bank of Ireland. Hamburg : Hesse, 
Neuman&Co. Paris: Hottlnguer& Co. New York: National Bank of Commerce. Bos- 
ton : Blackstone National Bank. Chicago : First National Bank. This Bank is pre- 
pared to transact a general Banking business. Deposits in Gold, Silver and Currency 
received subject to check or on special deposit. Exchange for sale on the principal 
cities of the United States, Great Britain, Ireland and the Continent. Commercia 
Credits issued available in Europe, Chii.a. and Japan. Collections attended to and 
prompt returns made at the lowest market rates of Exchange. Jan. 19. 

LONDON AND SAN FRANCISCO BANK, LIMITED. 

Capital. 82.100,000. 

San Francisco Office, 424 California street; London Office, 
22 Old Broad street. Portland Branch, Ainsworth's Building. Manager, 
ARTHUR SCRIVENER; Assistant Manager, WILLIAM STEEL. London Bankers, 
Bank of England and London Joint Stock Bank; New York, Drexel, Morgan Ai 
Co. ; Boston, Third National Bank. This Bank is prepared to transact all kinds 
of General Banking and Exchange Business in London and San Francisco, and 
between said cities and all parts of the world. Oct. 9. 



THE NEVADA BANK OF SAN FRANCISCO. 

Capital Paid Up 53,000, 000. 

Heserve, TJ. S. Bonds 4,000,000. 

Agency at New fork, 62 Wall street. 
A.geney at Virginia, Nev. 

Buys and sells ExchaDge and Telegraphic Transfers. Issues Commercial and Trav- 
elers' Credits. This Bank has special facilities for dealing in Bullion. Nov. 8. 

THE ANGLO-CALIFORNIAN BANK, LIMITED. 

422 California St., San Francisco. 

London Office, 3 Angel Con re ; New York Agents, JT. W. Sel- 
igman & Co., 21 Broad street. Authorized Capital Stock, Sti,000,000. Will re- 
ceive Deposits, open Accounts, make Collections, buy and sell Exchange and Bullion, 
loan Money, and issue Letters of Credit available throughout the world. 

FRED. F. LOW, IGN. STEINHART, Managers. 
P. N. Liliem thal, Cashier. Sept. 13. 

SECURITY SAVINGS BANK. 

UlTAKANTEE CAPITAL. 8300,000. 

Officers: Vice-President, Jerome Lincoln; Secretary, W. 
S. Jones ; Attorney, Sidney V. Smith. Loans made on Real Estate and other 
Approved Securities. Office : No. 216 Sansome street, San Francisco. Oct. 14. 

THE GERMAN SAVINGS AND LOAN SOCIETY. 

Deutsche Spar nnd Leihbanh, So 526 California street, San 
Francisco. Officers : President, L. GOTTIG. Board of Directors.— Fred. 
Roeding, Chas. Kohler, Edw. Kruse, George H. Eggers, N. Van Bergen, H. L. Simon, 
Peter Spreckels, Ign. Steinhart. Secretary, GEO. LETTE; Attorney, JOHN R. 
JARBOE. May 18. 

SELBY SMELTING AND LEAD COMPANY, 

416 Montgomery Street San Francisco. 

Gold and Silver Refinery and Assay Office. 

Highest Prices Paid for Gold, Silver and Lead Ores and Sulphurets. Manufac- 
turers of BLUESTONE. Also, Lead Pipe, Sheet Lead, Shot, etc. This Company 
has the best facilities on the Coast for working GOLD, SILVER and LEAK in their 
various forms. 

June 18. PRENTISS SELBY, Superintendent. 



TO LEASE, 

For a long- term—IiOt on north side of Townsend street, 
between Fourth and Fifth, 183 4-12 feet easterly from Fifth. Size 91 8-12 feet 
by 120 feet. Apply to JOHN ROACH, 

April i_ 219 Montgomery street. 



$66 



a we«k in your own town. Terms ;*nd *5 outfit free. 

Address H. Hallett & Co., Portland, Maine. 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER AND 



July 22, 1882. 



"PLEASURE'S WAND." 

''We Obey no "Wand but Pleasure's."— Tom Moore. 

The merest thread of a story drawn through three acts of grotesque 
pantomime, of wonderful stage mechanism and of marvelous antics, acro- 
batic and otherwise, is the entertainment given by the Hanlon troupe. It 
has not a plot of any dramatic merit, its characters have no particular 
individuality, and its dialogue is neither striking nor witty ; quite the 
reverse. But it serves its purpose admirably. It is simply a raison d'etre 
for all the fun, the cleverness and the capers of the remarkable fellows 
who constitute the troupe. Associated with the performers of the name m 
of Hanlon — of which there are five — there are two or three others, who 
have been identified with the troupe since the commencement of its career 
in this style of entertainment. All of these are remarkable for their in- i 1 
dividual agility. The outsiders, so to speak, who bear the burden of the 
dramatic part of the story are not only fully satisfactory in that respect, 
but are themselves quite expert in the physical tours de force that form 
the striking episodes of the show. In the French original there was a 
little more development of the dramatic part of the farce (to call it by 
some name), wholly in a spicy, naughty direction, for which the sleeping 
car scene afforded manifold opportunity. The English adaptor has seen 
fit to modify this, to the detriment of his work, I think. The charm of 
the performance lies in the rapidity and neatness of execution of the 
different tricks. The fun is produced by the suddenness of these capers 
and antics, and their invariably humorous form. The perfection of 
ensemble action is attained by the clever performers. Everything runs 
along smoothly, without a bitch of even the minutest kind. The brothers 
William and Frederick, who assume the roles of the two footmen, are the 
only ones whose performances are of the legitimate pantomimic order. 
They possess sufficient mobility of features, expression of countenance 
and significance and appropriateness of gesture to make their work most 
highly amusing and entertaining. The other brothers, and besides them 
Francis C. Wyatt and K. Jones, have to combine dialogue and acrobatics 
to carry out the requirements of their respective parts, anil that they do ' 
so most satisfactorily is a compliment to both their mental qualifications 
and their physical agility. Richard M. Carroll, Charles Arnold and E. 
V. Sinclair, who play the still more legitimate dramatic characters, are 
also more or less involved in the physical difficulties with which the enter- 
tainment abounds, but less so aggressively and decidedly more so objective- 
ly. On the female side of the cast, there is nothing of enough importance to 
deserve particular mention. Miss Kate Foley's character is the only one 
that rises above the ranks of the chorus girls, and as the author has, with 
due gallantry isolated the heroine from the breakneck situations, she has 
nothing to do but to sing a song and look pretty. The former require- 
ment she fills very badly, the latter she possesses most uudeniably. As 
a whole, this is a performance that, from its unique and novel character, 
presents a bountiful repast of food for amusement and laughter — laughter 
of that healthy kind that ripples forth naturally and heartily, and amuse- 
ment of that sort that refreshes the brain, tired of its routine workings. 
I have always thought that a Christmas pantomime, aa given at the Lon- 
don theatres, would be a big draw here, and the success of rhis entertain- 
ment substantiates my opinion, for, in its mechanical devices, Le Voyage 
en Suisse bears a strong resemblance to a Boxing Night show. A word of 
credit ib due to Robert Cntlar, on whom, as machinist, falls the responsi- 
bility of a successful manipulation of the stage machinery, and one of re- 
proach for the man who arranged the programme. The est, as printed, 
must be full of errors, for it does not contain the name of Alfred Hanlon, 
to whom reference is made in an appended note, and there are only two 
of the Captain's nephews on the stage, instead of the three on the pro- 
gramme. One of the two is young Carroll, the other must be either 
George or Edward Hanlon. What, then, becomes of the missing one 1 
It seems strange, too, that such a clever fellow as the one who plays the 
waiter should be at the foot of the list, under the humble name of R. 
Jones. The orchestra are playing in a most agreeable way under 
Schmidt's leadership; but the cornet-player seems to be a weak and in- 
different instrumentalist. The theatre is crowded nightly, and the audi- 
ence fairly beamB with jollity. 

***** 

No change to report at the California. Billy Rice is as fat and jocund 
as ever. There is a wealth of humor in his very appearance, and with 
his unction and decided aggressiveness of manner, is naturally in the fore- 
most ranks of end men. Thatcher's forte is a peculiarly mild way of speak- 
ing, that makes his jokes very effective. I would suggest, though en 
passant, that we have heard " Willie's Wishes" before, and a great many 
times, too, and that we all regret that we can't grant them, so they 
need not be expressed any more. This to Rice. To Thatcher I would 
apprehensively remark, that that whistle story was currently told long 

before well, long before whistles were invented. I say " apprehensively 

remark," for I understand that it is sacrilege to make any unpleasant re- 
marks about minstrel jokes, and I don't know but I may be struck by 
lightning. The septette sing their selections with very good taste. The 
programme is a good one, but here and there it is decidedly hackneyed 
and worn. 

***** 

I did not see Pinafore, as played by the Mitchell Pleasure Party. I 
put off going until this week, and they put off this week themselves — 
to the East. lam told that as far as Emma Carson, Calice and Bishop 
were concerned it was a very meritorious performance. As to the others, 
charity suggests silence. The theatre is now closed. 

Nothing new about the Bush street Theatre. Locke has recovered 
from his illness and is about. The amount of his indebtedness is larger 
than at first supposed. 

At the Tivoli and at the Winter Garden spectacular opera is in full 
sway. Both pieces are doing a tremendous business, and their respective 

bills are up for an indefinite period. 

***** * 

By my Eastern exchanges 1 see that there is a dearth of good leading 
men for stock companies. Why don't some one go to England and en- 
gage Charles Coghlan! He is an actor of the highest talent and ability, 
but did not seem to catch the public while in this country. I remember 
his unsuccessful engagement at the Baldwin some few years ago. He 



gained the appreciation of the cultured few, if not that of the ignorant 
many. 

***** 

Louise Panllin, one of San Francisco's girls, has "caught on" in New York. 
She was well known here in the past as a child actress, and latterly ap- 
peared with Emilie Melville. Her voice is said to have greatly improved. 

****** 

Sardou has declared his intention of ceasing to write for the stage as 
soon as he has finished some five or six plays now projected. He says hiB 
intention is based upon two things, the perversion of public taste and the 
want of actors. He says there are no longer any comedians ; there are 
only tenorini of operetta. He is right about this, and also when he refers 
to the perversion of public taste. Audiences now-a-days are so stupid 
and lacking of intelligence that they suffer exaggeration and convention- 
ality in place of demanding nature and art. 

* * ***** 

Sidney Cowell, a delightful soubrette, who recently finished a tour 
with one of the Hazel Kirke companies, objects to any more traveling. 
She aptly remarks : " Time spent on the wing is wasted time, profiting 
nothing to mind or body, further than the consciousness of working 
harder than is necessary for one's daily bread. And there is the melan- 
choly fact that the actor is obliged to degrade rather than to elevate his 
art. He cannot act up, but must act down to the level of the average 
country audience's appreciation." The little lady is quite right. The 
combination Bystem has worked, and is still working, deadly injury to 
dramatic art. It is a system that is all for the manager, and leaves noth- 
ing for the actor. 

***** 

Gilbert and Sullivan's new opera will be produced in London, Boston, 
New York, Chicago, Philadelphia and San Francisco simultaneously. For 
the next five years they cannot write anything for anybody but Michael 
Gunn and D'Oyley Carte, as per contract.— —•RuBsell Bassett is going to 
star! Do you remember him ? A weak, commonplace, alleged actor at 
the California some years ago. An " author," with a roll of manuscript 
under his arm, approached McConnell in front of the California yester- 
day. " Understand you want a new play, sir. I've got one here, sir, with a 
lighthouse in it." " Thank you," interrupted Mac, " but I am not play- 
ing lighthouses just now."— -Sothern's amusing book, Birds of a Feather 
Flock Together, is having a large sale. ■ < ■■ ■Manbury, who married Emma 
Cliefden, owns a yacht and is enjoying it.^— Ella Wesner is to the sur- 
face again. Some friends have been presenting her with jewelry. For 
what ?— Parsloe has a neat Summer-place at Long Branch.— Joseffy 
is at Newport.— ^Wilhelmj's tour of Australia was a financial failure, 
and he is on his way back to Europe. ^Euryanthe was sung in London 
recently for the first time in forty-three years.-^— John Gilbert says that 
the stage never was lower than it is now, and that he sees no art and no 
promise iu it. 'Catherine Lewis and hubby sailed for England under 
the name of Mr. and Mrs. Smith.^— Heme is still making money with 
Hearts of Oak, that watery drama — one-half sea and one-half tears.— 
Elsie Moore — pretty little Elsie — will play in one of Campbell's 
White Slave combinations next season. —Since my last, no more 
variety performers have joined the ranks of the legitimate.— 
A hotel-keeper, who engaged a concertist to play dance music at his house, 
boasted recently that he had a " private tooter " in his family.^— Whit- 
tier thinks we shall have trouble and annoyances in heaven. We may 
have to criticise the harp playing !— — A Boston paper, in a poem <>n the 
late Emerson, makes a bad typographical slip, and says, " We brayed and 
sang together." Must have been thinking of Billy.— It costs a good 
deal to go from New York to England and back, then to San Francisco 
and back, and about the same time, so managers all over the East are 
going to substitute an English tour to a Pacific Coast one for their compa- 
nies.^— The Philadelphians have issued a ukase abolishing the trustful 
monkey on top of the tuneful hand-organ. -^— The Frohmann Company 
takes away nearly all the familiar local theatrical people. Bradley, Jen- 
nings, Grismer, and Phtebe Davis are about the only ones left. Hold on ! 
there is also our old stand-by, Miss Clara Walters, alias '* Shamus 
O'Brien." I have heard her recite that over seventeen times. »■ There 
will he fourteen eccentric comedians on the road next season, Raymond, 
Joe Jefferson, Billy Florence, Nat Goodwin, Neil Burgess, Sol Smith 
Russell, C. B. Bishop, Curtis, Willie Edouin, John Howson, Mestayer, 
Roland Reed, Harry G. Richmond and Bob Graham. There is fun 
enough for all tastes. Besides these, J. J. Mackay and Jacques Kruger 
have stellar aspirations. ^— One scene in Romany Bye will cost S3.000 to 
get up. It is the foundering of the steamship, and is said to be the most 
intricate setting ever seen on the stage. In the third act of this same 
there will be an aviary containing five hundred live birds. In the cast 
there will be forty-two people ; and all this for a play that is nothing 
but rot, rot, rot. The hegira of local dramatic talent has not yet 
taken place, but is sufficiently near at hand to fill the " can't get-away ( 
crowd with envy and despair. Beauclerc. 

BALDWIN'S THEATRE. 

Great Success or 
T I-I K HANLON8, 

In Their Laughable Parisian Absurdity, 

Le Voyage En Suisse. 

Brine the Chi' da-en to the Matinee on Saturday Afternoon, 

And let them Enjoy Themselves for Two Hours and a Half, and be 

Kept Screaming with daughter. 

[July 22.| 

WINTER GARDEN, 

Stockton street, between Post and Sutter streets.—StAhl A 
Maack, Proprietors. Con tinned Success Nightly ol the WINTER GARDEN 
OPERA COMPANY, in John Burnett's Romantic Spectacular Opera of 

^EOLIA ! 

OR, THE MOUNTAIN SYLPH. This evening and until further notice will be con- 
tinued with its Mysterious Illusions, Startling Mechanical Effects and Gorgeous Scenic 
and Transformation Achievement. MISS ETHEL LYNTON and MR. FRED. BOR- 
NEMANN in the title roles. Grand Incantation Scene and Rendezvous of the 
Wizard of the Glen. Salamanders, Caverns, Sylph Land on Silver Lake, Palace of 
the ijueeu and Home of the Sylphs. July 22. 



July 22, 1882 



CALIFORNIA ADVKKTISKK 



SPORTINC ITEMS. 



Almost the (nile topic of rmiverMtioo in iporthlg drelei during the 
pant werk wtui the glove (exhibition between Sullivan, of Ho*ton, and 
ii. "f England, in tfndboo Ekjoara Gttdsu, on hut IVfondAjj 
night. The result of the mill am] how Sullivan failed to " knock out " 
his Mualler opponent were known to all the world long iffO, but the riurlit. 
for tight it may well be called, seems to me to teach a leeson well worthy 
of more than passing oirameot When the result of th« inutch came to 
ham) the people in the clubs, in aalomiH, in stores, barbershops, on 
'Change, and ftll places where men congregate, appeared to be lost in 
wonder and admiration at the vast strength and skill of Sullivan, who 
had managed to knock down " Tog " Wilson twentv seven times in half as 
many mlnntss. When it became known that "iW" Wilson had chal- 
lenged Sullivan to fight ■ fiat ti^ht, the indignation of the people here at 
the prasamption ol Wilson know no bounds. The idea of any nian darine 
t»» challenge Sullivan seemed to be absurd in the extreme. That Sullivan 
failed to knock his opponent out was to them only a proof that Wilson 
possesses a tremendous capacity to receive punishment; that he knocked 
Wilson down twenty seven times was accepted as proof that no man in 
the world has any show with Sullivan at all in a fight whose length is only 
limited by the defeat of one of the contestants. To me the fight tolls an 
utterly different tale. I am no great believer in the prowess of "Tug" 
Wilson ; I do not believe that he is as good a man as was Tom Savers in 
bis best days, but I have a still poorer opinion of Sullivan's merit as a 
fighter, and fancy that this fight proves him to be nothing but a hot- 
headed *' rusher," without even the brute power to hit that has generally 
been accorded to him. Wilson is an old ring fighter, and is well versed 
in all the arts and tricks of professional pugilists. He was seconded by 
Edwards and Chambers, the two most cunning pugilists who ever fought 
in a ring. Their only object was to save Wilson from being knocked 
out, and thereby win a Btated sum of money and certain fame that 
possesses a tangible value. Clearly Wilson's plan was to spar against 
time to avoid punishment. Sullivan had nothing to fear from him in the 
shape of return blows, and could therefore concentrate all his strength 
and energy on knocking him down. Wilson soon found that the best plan 
to avoid punishment was to go down, and it may fairly be presumed that 
he fell as often and as quickly as possible. Each fall meant for him a rest 
of ten seconds, and a fall without a severe blow had also the effect of mad- 
dening Sullivan and causing bim to waste his strength and hit wildly. 
The telegraph says that Wilson cleverly avoided several blows that would 
have knocked over a horse. This shows that Sullivan's distances were 
bad, as no man should deliver a blow with all his strength unless he i* 
sure bis opponent's body is in a place to meet its force. Sullivan's ill- 
judged blows only had the effect of exhausting his strength, and did Wil- 
son no harm. In the first round, when Sullivan was fresh and strong, he 
knocked Wilson down nine times. In the next round he managed to floor 
bim eight times. The six minutes hard hitting then commenced to tell, 
and in the third round he could only floor Wilson five times. In the last 
round he knocked Wilson off his feet twice and three times Wilson went 
down from light blows. He was then played out, and had the tight been 
continued, Wilson, who was fresh and unexhausted, could have punished 
Sullivan severely, and perhaps done a little knocking down himself. This 
will be Sullivan's fate the first time he meets a good man in the ring. He 
will wear himself out with his passionate, ungovernable rushes, and then 
fall an easy prey to the mau who had sense enough to husband his 
strength. Such a man as Jem Mace was ten years ago would find it an 
easy task to make Sullivan whip himself. He is nothing without his 
rushes, and he cannot keep them up long, as the late mill shows. Had 
the " mill " been under the rules of the London Ring it would have 1 con- 
sisted of 27 rounds and would have lasted 25 minutes. Many of the hard- 
est fights for the championship in the days of Cribb, Spring, Brettie, 
Mike Madden and Sayers did not last as long as that, and it does 
not show Sullivan to be much of a wonder when he is unable to beat 
a small middle weight, with more work and time than it took Cribb to 
win the championship of England against one of the best men that ever 
lived. Wilson is nearly ten years older than Sullivan, and for eleven 
years from the time he was twenty-two years of age be left the ring, and 
lived the life of an ordinary English mechanic. He made a hard right 
with Alf Greenfield, but was not successful in whipping him, and is uot 
considered in England to be up to championship form. Sullivan's entire 
reputation rests upon his having beat Faddy Ryan, a mau who was 
" stood off " by old Joe Goss for 47 rounds, and then only won "because 
Goss was worn out. If a fist fight, under London ruleB, ever conies about 
between the two heroes of last Monday, I rather fancy that Sullivan's 
fame will receive no added lustre. The match, however, is very much in 
doubt. When 316,000 in gate money rewards a couple of " pugs " for fif- 
teen minutes' work with the gloves — and which, according to all accounts, 
hurt neither of them— it is hardly likely thut they will care to risk fame, 
and perhaps liberty, in a fist fight, that at most will only net the winner 
a paltry couple of thousands, i —Owen Judge took my remarks of last 
week so much to heart that he has been hard at work ever since, training 
for his mill with Dan O'Connell on Monday night next. I have again 
been requested by many ladies and gentleman to point out the fact that 
the Dan O'Connell who is to fight Judge is a recent importation, and uot 
the O'Connell whose beautiful little book of poems and frequent appear- 
auce as Poet of the Day, at Blue and Gray celebrations, have endeared 
him to the hearts of all lovers of genius. I am pleased to make the an- 
nouncement, and am also free to state that Dan, the poet, possesses such 
magnificent proportions that he would prove as great a hero in the field of 
muscle as in the field of literature. 

******* 

The result of the boat race at Long Bridge last Sunday was a great sur- 
prise to many, and especially to Tom Flynn, who had so little respect for 
his adversary, Leander Stevenson, that he paid little or no attention to 
training. Flynn had all the worst of the race by drawing the outside po- 
sition and having to row against a five-knot current while bis opponent 
was blessed with slack water. Had the positious beeu reversed the result 
might have been reversed also, but Flynn was not in condition to beat 
Stevenson on even terms after the first mile. Flynn is the better oars- 
man and possesses the greater strength, but his judgment is uot good, and 
the mistake, in policy, he made, of turning the stake boat from south to 
north, was of itself sufficient to lose him the race. 



The yacht Fleur d« Lis, which wsi BUppossd to have been a trifle over 
tqjarred when defeated by the Nellie, dm born cut down s trifle in that 
respect, snd her owners ere now so confident that she can beat tin- Nellie 
that they propose another race f>>r 92,500 s rids, or as mnefa more as the 
Nellie folks will put up, Hyde Bowie h*i boon absent at Santa Cnu and 
Monterey with the Nellie, during the pant month, and it cannot yet be 
told whether or not he will make t > i - ■ match. In case a race is made, it 
is probable that the Fleur de Lis will be Bailed by one ot the pilots, and 
not by Captain White. 

At San Brunei, last Sunday, thirteen members of the Cosmopolitan 
Club competed for the Club medal. Maskey carried off the prize with 11 
ki!K being the only one who did not make two misses or more. Later in 
the day, shooting at three pair, Maskey won more honors with a clean 
score, the only one made. As Maskey has won the medal three times in 
succession, it now becomes his personal property, and the Club will have 
to procure another badge of honor for future competitions. 

* * * # • 

Reports from all the Bay counties show that quail are very forward 
this season, and are also plentiful. Many large bevies have been seen, 
and all the young birds are able to fly well — in fact, they are almost 
ready to shoot. Doves are about as plentiful as usual, and bagB are 
easily made in the southern part of this peninsula. Deer are plentiful in 
the coast counties, and venison is about as cheap as any meat in the 
market. 

***** 

To day the second athletic meeting given by the Olympic Club on their 
new grounds at Oakland will take place. The principal events are 440 
and 100 yard Club handicaps, and a series of bicycle races. The track is 
in the best possible order, and the day's racing is expected to be first-class. 

■ ■ Myers has expressed a willingness to come to California to wipe out 
the stain of his defeat by Brooks. 

PLATT'S HALL. 

Positively Last Appearance of 

Mme. Rive-King. 

liiiiH Af'ternoou, Farewell Matinee at -i p.m. 

Admission to All Parts of the House One Dollar 

6j£T" No Extra Charne for Reserved Seats. 

Ddcker Brothers' Celebrated Concert Grand Piano used. 

[Jul.v 22.] 

BOXING! BOXING! BOXING! 

OLD TURN VEREIN HALL No. 620 Bush Street. 

A Grand Athletic Entertainment will be g-lven on Mon- 
day evening, July 24th. consisting of Boxing, Wrestling and Club Swinging 
by the Champions of the Pacific Coast. The entertainment will close with a 

BONA FIDE GLOVE CONTEST 

For $250 and the Championship Df the Pacific Coast, between OWEN JUDGE, the 
present Champion, and DAN O'CONNELL. 

NOTICE. —The match will be decided according to the Marquis of Queensuury 
rules, and will be decided without fear nr favor, an this is really a bona fide match, 
Mr. Patsey Hogan having deposited the sum of 3250 in the hands of the Editor of 
the Pacific Life, who is final stakeholder, and who shall pay the money according to 
the decision of the Referee. BILLY JOURDAN, 

Master of Ceremonies. 

Admission ...$1 00 ! Reserved Seats $1 50 

(July 22) 

TIVOLI GARDEN, 

E«l<ly street, nmr Market. --Kreliii£ Bros., Proprietors. 
Great Success Every evening until further notice, Weber's Grand Romantb 
Opera, 

Dar Freisohutz ! 

ok THE SEVEN CHARMED BULLETS. With the following artists in the cast: 
MISS LOUISE LESTER, MISS LoUISE L':iGKTON, Miss Carrie Godfrey, MR T. 
W. ECKERT, MR. F. URBAN, Mr.M. Cornell, Mr. Knight, Mr. Niemann, Mr. Evans, 
Mr. Vidal This Evening: Mr. T. W. Eckert as "Max," Miss Louise Leighton as 
"Agathe." July 82. 

SEASIDE GARDEN! 

Presidio. Terminus of Union-street Cable RohiI. EVERY 
WEDNESDAY, SATURDAY and SUNDAY, GRAND GALA CONCERT by 
the Full United States Presidio Band, of 24 Pieces. Commencing at 12 m. Carl 
Kreyer, Director. Admission, FREE. July 22. 

ST. JAMKS HOTEL, 

SAN JOSE, OAL. 
TYLER BEACH Proprietor 

This Hotel is elegantly furnished, with all the modern improvements. The rooms 
are large, airy and beautifully situated in front of St, James Park ; next door to the 
Court House. No expense has been spared in making this a First-class Hotel in 
every respect. 

American Plan Rates, S1.50 to $2,50 per Day. 

special Prices by the Week or Month. 
Coach and Carriage at Depot on Arrival of all Trains. 

WANTED," 

The present address of Peter JIucKeiizie, son of Alexander 
JIacKcnzie, late of Easter Lays, by Inverness, Scotland, who was employed 
about the mines in Placer County about four years ago. If any person knows where 
he is, please communicate with Alexander MaeKenzie, 60 Academy street, Inverness, 
Scotland. Other papers please copy. Jul y 22. 

DANCING ACADEMY,™ 

IN RED MEN'S BUILDING, 
No. 320 Post Street Opposite Union Square. 

PROF O A. LUNT respectfully announces that his new Academy, No. 320 Post 
street, is now open for Juvenile and Evening Classes. Office Hours, for Terms, etc., 
10 a.m. to 12 ii , and 1 to 5 p.m. "«■ 2Z - 

No woman really practices economy unless she uses the Diamond 
Dyes. Many dollars can be saved every year. Ask the druggist. 



8 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER AND 



July 22, 1882. 



HAPPY LOVE. 

While they sat before the fire, Then he ventured to inquire 
Nothing more did he desire, If her sister, Jane Mariar,_ 

Than to get a little nigher, And her mother and her sire, 

If he could ; Were quite well ? 

And his heart beat high and higher, And from time to time he'd eye her, 
And her look grew shy and shyer, As though he would like to buy her, 
When he sidled up close by her, And his bashfulness was dire, 
As he should. For a spell. 

Then his husky throat grew dryer 
When he told her that 'Squire 
To himself would gladly tie her 

If she would ; 
Might he now go ask her sire? 
When she said to his desire, 
That he could! 

— Burlington Hawkeyc 

OUR LONDON LETTER. 

London, June 29, 1882 : The grand military tournament at Agricul- 
tural Hall has been a great success. On the eve of the anniversary of the 
battle of Waterloo the Life Guards wore sprigs of laurel in their caps, 
and their horses were also adorned with laurel, while an interesting fea- 
ture of their drill was the sounding of tbeir final charge on the identical 
bugle blown at Waterloo by Trumpeter Edwards, who bequeathed it to 
the regiment some twelve years since. The Life Guards are one of the 
three regiments of Household Cavalry who have not been in battle, or 
indeed on active service, since Waterloo; so it is but natural they should 
make as much as possible of their last appearance. The "holiday parade" 
character of the corps has of late drawn so much talk down upon them 
that their officers, smarting under these criticisms, have persuaded the 
authorities who rule the War Office and Horse Guards to place them 
upon the roster to take their regular turn on foreign service; so that, 
should Arabi Bey need attending to on land, as well as from the fleet, it 
is probable the Household Cavalry will be among the first to be sent to 
the seat of war. 

The Duke of Hamilton's sale still attracts wonderful interest, and enor- 
mously high prices have, so far, been realized. It proves pretty clearly 
that people who bave pictures, antique furniture and bric-a-brac to dis- 
pose of ought never to be below the rank of a Duke. It is astonishing, as 
the social scale ascends, how one figure after another is added to the re- 
sults — from tens to hundreds, from hundreds to thousands, and from 
thousands to tens of thousands. Unquestionably, some of the Duke of 
Hamilton's pictures and bric-a-brac are choice, many rare, and all of un- 
doubted origin and pedigree ; but, as works of art, the prices given have 
been enormous. 

" Society," and that means the upper stratum thereof, has been greatly 
exercised over, and sadly scandalized by, the defiant manner in which 
Lord Shrewsbury brought home his second-hand Countess — Mr. Mundy's 
divorced wife. On the arrival of the pair at Ingestre, from London, they 
were met at the station by a large number of the tenantry of the estates, 
and escorted to Ingestre Hall. The route from the station to the Hall 
was decorated with flags and triumphal arches, and the Earl and 
Countess loudly cheered. The wedding festivities are to be on a prodigal 
scale, and the rejoicings of a character rarely equaled — all of which shows 
not alone what society is coming to, but how little regard and respect the 
British farmer has for female purity and virtue, when the question of 
high or low rent is an issue. 

The musical Bensation of the hour, aside from Wagner's Tristan und 
Isolde, which was produced for the first time in England on Tuesday 
night, at Drury Lane, and pronounced to be the greatest of all his works, 
is the concert to be given to-morrow night, at Stafford House, by aristo- 
cratic amateurs in aid of the funds of the Royal College of Music. Among 
the solo singers and instrumental performers are the Countesses of North- 
esk and Romney, Viscountess Folkestone (who organized the affair) and 
Lord William Compton, while the chorus will consist of such ladies as 
the Marchioness of Waterford, the Countesses of Westmoreland, Itchester, 
Clarendon and Antrim, Lady Agusta Montague, Lady Florence Dun- 
combe, and others too numerous to mention. One of the chief attractions 
is to be a string band composed exclusively of ladies. The Princess of 
Wales, as well as the Prince, takes a great interest in the success of the 
College of Music, and exerts her influence to get subscribers to it. 

The coaching season is now on, and numbers of people take advantage 
daily of this attractive mode of seeing the country. The coaches start 
from Hatchett's, in Piccadilly, in the morning, and drive to Sarbiton, 
thus passing through Fulham, Putney,* Wimbledon and Kingston, and 
consequently amid picturesque scenery such as only England can furnish, 
and to see which properly one needs a more extensive means of view than 
that afforded by the narrow limits of a railway carriage window. 

Sarah Bernhardt was paid rather an unusual compliment the other 
night, and one by no means calculated to decrease the quality of self- 
esteem which the thin lady possesses in no infinitessimal degree, as every- 
body knows. Between two of the acts of the Sphinx the Prince and 
Princess left their box, and kept the rest of the audience waiting for 
twenty minutes while they congratulated Sarah, and the Princess pre- 
sented her with a bouquet. 

The last information in regard to Mrs. Langtry is that she and her 
party will sail for America in a White Star steamer about the end of Sep- 
tember, and the tour will last five months in the Northern and Western 
cities, such as Boston, New York, Philadelphia, Chicago, St. Louis and 
possibly New Orleans. It is exceedingly doubtful if she will visit the 
Pacific Coast ; so Californians who have a hankering to see the Jersey 
Lily and her bewitching ankles (which English people think American 
journalists have been over fond of raving about) they will have to take a 
railway journey to do it. Perhaps if results don't pan out as Abbey ex- 
pects in the Eastern States he may be induced to take the famouB beauty 
to 'Frisco. 

At the third annual dinner of fche Birmingham Press Club, given at the 
Grand Hotel on Saturday evening, Mr. George Augustus bala was the 
chief guest. He made a most interesting speech, and told the story, in 
his peculiarly happy manner, of how he gave up the brush for the pen in 
1851. 

The Mulberry Busk, a comedy by James Abbey, is one of the latest 
theatrical successes. Yours, Droo. 



INSURANCE. 



HUTCHINSON & MANN, 

INSTOANCE AGENCY . 
322 A 324 California Street. San Francisco, 



Fixe Insurance. 



TEUTONIA of New Orleans. 

LACONFIANCE of Paris. 

DWELLING HOUSE UNDERWRITERS 

ofNewTork. 

THE FIRE INS. ASSOCIATION (Limited) 
of London, England. 



GIRARD of Philadelphia. 

NEW YORK CITY INS. CO of N. Y. 

NEW ORLEANS ASSOCIATION 

PEOPLES of Newark. 

WATERTOWN of New York. 

ST. PAUL 0fSt.Paul. 

Marine Insurance. 

LONDON AND PROVINCIAL MARINE INSURANCE CO of London. 

LA FONCIERE MARINE INSURANCE COMPANY of Paris. 

Capital Represented $27,000,000. 

All bosses Equitably Adjusted and Promptly Paid. 

W. L. CHALMERS. 
Special Agent and Adjuster. 

AGGREGATE ASSETS, 

840.64T942. 

Imperial Fire Insurance Co., of London Instituted 1803. 

London Assurance Corporation, of London 

Established by Royal Charter 1720. 

Northern Assurance Corporation, of London Established 1886. 

Queen Insurance Company, of Liverpool Established 1857. 

A JOINT POLICY ISSUED RY THE FOUR COMPANIES. 

SOBJEKI DICKSOJf, Manager. 
W. JjAlfB BOOKER, Agent and Attorney. 
S.E. Cor. California and Montgomery Sts., Safe Deposit Building. 
[October 11.J 

PHtENIX ASSURANCE COMPANY 

Of London, Eng., EstaVd 1782.— Cash Assets, £5,266,372.35. 

BRITISH AMERICA "ASSURANCE COMPANY 

Of Toronto, Can., EstaVd 1833.--Cash Assets. $1,343,908.54 

WESTERN ASSURANCE COMPANY 

Of Toronto, Can., EstaVd 1851.— Cash Assets, SI. 357,326.39. 

BUTLER A HALDAN, 
General Agents f or Pacific Coast, 

413 California Street San Francisco. 

[July 10.1 

HOME MUTUAL INSURANCE COMPANY, OF CALIFORNIA. 

Organized 1864. 
Principal Office 406 California Street. S. F. 

FIRE INSURANCE. 

Capital (Paid TJp in T/.S. Sold Coin) $300,000.00 

Re-Insurance Reserve $171,412 76 



Assets January 1, 1882 § 684,577.83 I Premiums, since organization. $3,841,412.07 

Surplua for policy holders.. 674,577.83 I Losses, since organization... 1,756,278.00 

OFFICERS: 

J. F. HOUGHTON President. I CHAS. R. STORY Secretary. 

J. L. N. SHEPHARD .... Vice-President. | R. H. MAGILL General Agent. 

Directors of the Home Mutual Insurance Co.:— L. L. Baker, H. L. Dodge, J. L. 
N. Shepard, John Currey, J. F. Houghton, W. T. Garratt, C. C. Burr, J. S. Carter, 
Charles Beldiug, D. W. Earl. April 8. 



PACIFIC DEPARTMENT 

LONDON AND LANCASHIRE FIRE INSURANCE COMPANY 

OF UYEKPOOL. 

Capital S7,600,000 

Cash Assets 1,709.976 

Cash Assets in United States 775,003 

BALFOUR, GUTHRIE A CO., General Agents, 
March 20. 316 California Street, San Francisco. 

FIRE AND MARINE INSURANCE.--UNION INS. CO. OF S. F. 

The California Lloyds.--. Established In 1861.— Iffos. 416 and 
418 California street. Cash Capital, $750,000 in Gold Coin. Fair Rates ! 
Prompt Settlement of Loses ! ! Solid Security ! ! DIRECTORS. —J. Mora Moss, 
Moses Heller, J. O. Eldridge, M. J. O'Connor, R. S. Floyd, Daniel Meyer, Adam 
Grant, A. E. Sabatie, Charles Kohler, E. L. Goldstein, Bartlett Doe, I. Lawrence 
Pool, A- Weill, I. Steinhart, N. B. Stone, Wallace Everson, A. B. Phipps, Samuel 
Hort, H. C. Parker, N. G. Kittle, Joseph Brandcnstein, W. M. Hoag, Nicholas 
Luning, James Moffltt, John Parrott, J. Baum, M. D. Sweeney, Gustave Touchard, 
George C. Hickox, J. H. Freeman, John Conly, J. H. Baird, Wm. Scholle, Charles 
Bauiu, J. G. Kittle, Benjamin Brewster, Isaac L. Requa. 

GUSTAVE TOUCHARD, President. N. G. KITTLE, "Vice-President. 

Jambs D. Bailey, Secretary. Gso. T. Bohkn, Surveyor. Nov. 6. 

THE SWISS MARINE INS. COMPANIES COMBINED. 

Switzerland, of Zurich, Capital 5,000,000 francs; Helvetia, 
of St. Gall, Capital 10,000,000 francs ; Baloise, of Basle, Capital 5,000,000 francs. 
These thret' Companies are liable jointly and severally for all losses that may be sus- 
ained. Losses made payable in all the principal seaports of the world. In the set- 
tlement of all claims under an English policy, these Companies will strictly adhere to 
the conditions and customs adopted at Lloyds, and submit to English jurisdiction. 
June 9. HARRY W. SYZ, Agent, 225 Sansome St., S. F. 

BRITISH AND FOREIGN MARINE INS. CO. OF LIVERPOOL. 

Balfour, Guthrie 4b Co., No. 

Nov. 18. 



(Capital 95,000,000.— Agents: 
/ 316 California street, San Francisco. 



July 22, 1882 



CALIFORNIA ADVERTISER. 



THE BOBOLINK. 

No l*'k <>f Ni-Artet buga be sure 

Of Itojtt-riie*. dragon ftteti ami moth*. 
Sly lion ant* that trap and lure, 

With tigi-r bwtles fierce an Goths 

Ana terrible an Vandals. 

QlMB span wnruirt, clambering like sloths, 

Cicada- whetting horny Weakn, 
(add »pident weaving silvery cloths. 

And beeM that rob like very (ireekst 
To feed their queen commanders, 
Kcd initi's that love the noonday haats, 

Wood -nymphs and peacock butterflies, 
Small aphidae exuding sweets, 

Ichneumona dipped in Tyrian dyes 
Like mimic Alexanders. 
Ah, then all out of perfect skies 

Rushed in the lover bobolinks! 
Like Pai^anini, music wise 

Each bird will tell you what he thinks 
On just that one stringed viol. 
Should Handel, Mozart, Mendelssohn, 

Let awful challenges afloat, 
This little master all alone 

Half way in Heaven, would tune bis throat 
And dare them to the trial. 
V, ven so ; the sun is for the mote, 
And for the nautilus the sea ; 
.Krial space for one sweet note, 
The Universe for you and me ; 
God's own accords and closes. 
For Chapel-musties great and small 

sealed stone lips of desert Sphynx 

Keep silence ! These will answer all, 

Meantime my singing bobolinks 

Brought down the heavens in roses. 

— From "A Prorie Idyl and Other Poems. 

ELECTRICITY, ETC. 

^— Once having passed from the transmission of one message to two 
messages upon a single wire between distant cities, and again from two to 
four and from four to five, it might appear easy steps to progress farther 
in this direction. But the difficulties increase vastly as the greater num- 
ber is attempted. By the ingenious method recently patented by a Mr. 
Jones, three telegraphic messages can be sent simultaneously in each di- 
rection over one conducting wire. In order to raise the value of a quad- 
ruplex to a sextuplex it was necessary to invent an entirely new quadru- 
plex, to be operated upon by straight or unreversing currents, and in this 
system the addition of the Siemens' polarized relay and ordinary pole- 
changing keys would render possible the six-message transmissions. No 
such system has been produced except one by Mr. Jones. He has now 
added a remarkable advance upon his former invention, and the new sys- 
tem has been worked with success upon some short lines. It was tried 
on the Western Union line, between New York and Philadelphia, in Jan- 
uary last year, with very satisfactory results, but the high potential cur- 
rent used with the experimental apparatus at that time could not be then 
trusted upon the defective cables across the Hudson River. 

^— The Birmingham correspondent of the Ironmonger says : — "In no 
branch of our local industry have greater advances been made during the 
past few years than in that devoted to electro- plating. Since the intro- 
duction, indeed, of dynamo machines in substitution for batteries quite a 
revolution has been effected in the trade ; and whether for silver, nickel, 
brass, or copper-plating, the advantages of these machines in regard both 
to economy and efficiency are so great that they have become practically 
indispensable to every one who aspires to make plating on a large scale a 
commercial success." The same authority also states that there are now 
some 6,000 to 7,000 Bunsen cells in use in the nickel-plating business. 

— The steamship, " Austral," the latest addition to the Orient fleet 
of steamers, has been fitted with electric lights by Messrs. Siemens Bros. 
The whole of the public rooms, engine room, pantries, and passage ways 
are lighted by this means. Five Siemens arc lights are used in the engine 
room and four on deck whilst 170 Swan lamps do duty elsewhere. The 
current is supplied by two Siemens alternate current dynamos, each 
driven by a separate engine strong enough to drive them both. The total 
candle-power of the arc lights is reckoned at 3,600, and that of the Swan 
lamps at 3,400, being a total of 7,000 candles. 

- —According to recent statistics there are, on an average, four miles 
and a half of wire to every mile of telegraph line in England. 

^— A narrow-gauge electric railway in Fairmount Park, Philadelphia, 
is proposed. — Electrician, 

OPIUM AND ALCOHOL. 

In the annual medical report of the Straits Settlements, under the 
head of general diseases, Class IV., I find the following results: Poison- 
ing by alcohol, Europeans, 18; Chinese, 3, and Indians, 1 for Singapore. 
For Penang and Province Wellesley the figures are 8 Europeans, 1 
Malay, and 7 Indians ; and for Malacca 1 Indian, making in all a total 
for the whole settlements of 26 Europeans, 3 Chinese, 1 Malay and 9 In- 
dians. ^ The next item is poisoning by opium. I find in Singapore 2 Chi- 
nese ; in Penang and Province of Wellesley, 3 Chinese ; and Malacca 
none, making a total of 5 in all. These figures are surely significant of 
something, and are worthy of some notice. They show even further re- 
sults when it is considered that the number of Chinese in the above men- 
tioned places is over 300,000, and that the number of Europeans of all na- 
tionalities, including the military, is only about 4,000. It points out one 
of two things, either that the abuse of alcohol is very great, and that the 
Chinese are more temperate in their desires, or that opium is not so 
deadly in its results as it is generally made out to be. Further comment 
is unnecessary.— "Straits" in London and China Express. 

The new food, which has cured the chronic dyspeptics of Japan, is 
Midzu Ami (Japanese Malt), at Ichi Ban. 



INSURANCE. 



The Only Company on the Pacific Coaat Governed by the Massa- 
chusetts Non-Forfeiture Law. 



NEW ENGLAND MUTUAL LIFE INSURANCE COMPANY, 

OF BOSTON. 

[INCORPORATED 1S3S.] 

Assets tI6.000.000. 



This Ciiipiiiv la Purely Mutual, tnd ha* transacted the hiMlncNHof Life liumrance 
for nearly forty years. All it* policies are humeri under ami govenud by the law* 
of Massachusetts, which rimviiie that: 

First— No policy shall become forfeited «r v. ml fur non-payment of I'rcniium, aflor 
the payment of TWO Annual Premium*. 

Second— In default of payment nf subsequent Premiums, it in binding on the 
Company to issue a Paid-up Policy, as provided (<<r according to the published tobies. 

The above conditions arc available to all IMieyholdors, who become such uftcr 
Jan. 1, 1831, without further negotiation or stipulation or notification on their part. 

Whenever, after the payment of TWO Annual Premiums, as aforesaid, the insura- 
ble interest in the life of the insured has terminated, the net value of the policy, sub- 
ject to certain conditions named in said Non-furfeiture Law, \» made a surrender 
value payable in Cash. Distributions of Burpliu are made annually on the Contri- 
bution system and are progressive. Liberality and Equity in its relations with Pol- 
icy-holders have always been the governing principles of this Company, and the con- 
ditions of its Policies in regard to limits cl Resldeuce and Travel arc of the most 
liberal description. 

IS* - Before insuring in any Company, carefully read the Application and Form of 
Policy used by the NEW ENGLAND LIFE. 

HENRY K. FIELD, General A*ent. 
Office: 328 Montgomery Street (Safe Deposit Building), San Francisco. 



ENGLISH COKE. 

Best Old Company's Sugar Loaf 

Lump Lehigh Coal. 

Anthracite Egg Coal. 
Cumberland Coal, 
Pig Iron and all 
Steaxxa. fixxci House Coals. 

For Sale in Lota to Suit, at «r LOWEST MAKKET RATES. 

BLACK DIAMOND COAL 

M'G CO., 
Corner Spear and Folsom Streets. 

JAMES G. STEELE & CO.. 

DRUGGISTS AND CHEMISTS, 

Agents for KICOED'S RESTORATIVE PTT.T.S. 

635 Market Street San Francisco, Cnl. 

PALACE HOTEL. June 24. 

R. CUTLAR, D.D.S., 

Has Removed His Dental Office 

From 715 Clay Street to No. 23 Post Street. 

Office Hour*— From 10 A..M. to B P.JH. 

[May 0.] 



WILLIAM F. SMITH, M.D., 

OCULIST. 

1 formerly at No. 313 Bn-.li street, lias removed to Phelan's 
' Bnll«Un(r, Rooms 300 to :idi. Hours for Consultation: 12 m. to 3 p.m. 
Take the Elevator May 27. 

DR. JAMES W. KEENEY, 

OFFICE AND RESIDENCE: 22 MONTGOMERY STREET. 

HOXTRS: 2 to 4. 7 to 7:30 p.m. 
SUNDAYS: 3 to 4 p.m. April 9. 

DR. WILLIAM E. TAYLOR. 

OFFICE: 215 GEARY' ST. RESIDENCE: THE BALDWIN. 

Feb. 5.] OFFICE HOURS: 1 to 4 P.M. 

PAINTING, TINTING, WHITENING AND PAPER-HANGING. 

Gentlemen about to bave work in this line done will ben- 
efit themselves by calling at my establishment, examine samples of workman- 
ship, and getting estimates of Cost. Orders sent by telephone (No. 433) from any 
pavt of the city promptly attended to. E M. GALLAGHER, 

July 8. 611 Sacramento Street, bet. Montgomery and Kearny. 

TURKISH AND RUSSIAN 

Steam Batbs: Electric and Cbemlcal Bt»ttas; Snlpbnr and 
and other medicated vapor baths, with Swedish movements and massage. 
Special apartments for ladies and families. DR. JUSTIN GATES, 

July 1. 722 Montgomery street, near Washington. 

MILLARD F. BRADLEY, 

Ciesrcher or Records, Boom 37, 118 Post st., San Francisco. 



Office Hours: 5 to 9 p.m. 



$72 



A week. S12 a day at home easily made. Costly Outfit Free. 

Address True k Co., Augusta. Maine. 



10 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER AND 



July 22, 1882. 



OURSELVES. 
The News Letter was established on the twentieth day of July, 1856, 
consequently with this issue it will enter upon the twenty-seventh year oj 
its existence. Standing, therefore, as we do, upon the threshold of this 
new period in our journalistic career, it is meet and proper that we throw 
a retrospective glance back over the past, survey our present surroundings 
and peer into the mysteries of the future. 

The career of the News Letter has been an eventful one. Twenty- 
seven years ago it started as a two-page weekly, one side being blank for 
letter-writing purposes. From that small beginning it advanced gradu- 
ally, until it reached its present size of twenty well-filled pages and a 
four-page cover. Throughout its long career the News Letter has ever 
been consistent and manly. We started out with the avowed intention of 
promoting the substantial interests of the State and Coast, and we have 
never failed to do so. It is our proud boast that we have never sought to 
catch the fitful breeze of popular favor, and never bowed to popular 
prejudice, which is little better than the howling of the mob. We have 
sought to lead public opinion and'to mold public sentiment, not to fol- 
low public opinion or be fashioned by public sentiment. We have la- 
bored to educate the masses out of their prejudices, rather than get down 
and wallow with them in the mire of ignorance and passion. In doing 
this, we have necessarily, at times, prejudiced our own popularity and 
success, but in the long run our sturdy independence has been appre- 
ciated, and to-day the News Letter is prosperous, respected and influen- 
tial. We have made, it is true, active, bitter enemies. There is not a 
rogue or a humbug in the community who does not hate the News Letter 
as the devil hates holy water ; but then, it would be strange, indeed, if 
this were not so, for we have been the bane of the existence of that class. 
We have struggled, and struggled hard, too, to purify this community. 
We have never hesitated to attack and expose wrong in high places ; we 
have never hesitated to denounce the defiantly vicious, or to tear the 
mask from the plausible hypocrite. We attacked and exposed the igno- 
rant crowd of unlicensed quacks, who had dubbed themselves doctors, 
and if to-day the citizens of San Francisco can rely upon getting the ser- 
vices of a trained medical man— and not those of a stable-boy or a cook- 
when they call in a doctor, they may thank the News Letter for it. We 
attacked and exposed the swindlers who infested the stock market, and 
succeeded in purifying it to an extent. We attacked and exposed the 
trade frauds so generally practiced, and demonstrated in this connection 
that even at the bar of one of the leading hotels the liquors sold were 
badly adulterated, if not absolutely poisonous. We attacked and exposed 
the shamefully extortionate methods of that powerful corporation, the 
telephone monopoly. We attacked and exposed the rottenness of the 
Police force and a variety of other institutions, and we attacked and ex- 
posed a thousand and one individual sores on the body of our soci- 
ety. This course has, as we said before, made us many bitter, vindictive 
enemies, but it also won for us the approbation and respect of the better 
classes, whose support is abiding and worth having, and, consequently, 
the News Letter is a power in the land. As a business property, the 
paper is now valuable. Its circulation is large and extends all over the 
globe, and it is daily increasing, while its advertising patronage exceeds 
that of any other weekly on the Pacific Coast, and probably that of any 
in the country. 

Within the past year the publishers of the News Letter found it 
necessary, in order to accommodate their largely increasing business, to 
obtain a new press. An order was, therefore, given to the Campbell 
Printing PreBB Manufacturing Company, of New York, to construct 
specially for our use one of their presses, of sufficient capacity to print 
and cut sixteen pages of the News Letter at one impression, and to run 
off 5,000 copies an hour. This implement for molding public thought 
arrived about six weeks ago, and is now in perfect running order. It is 
of the same pattern and make as the presses upon which Picturesque 
Europe* -Picturesque America, The Art Journal ', and a great many other 
high-clas3 illustrated publications .are printed upon. It was recommended 
to us as being the best press made to-day for the execution of very fine 
printing, and its performauce has shown that the recommendation was 
deserved. Its ease of motion is astonishing, and its thorough and even 
distribution of ink amazing. It can accomplish more and better work, 
with a lesser expenditure of ink and fewer spoiled sheets than any other 
press made. In fact, to mention all the good qualities of this remarkable 
piece of machinery would consume more space than can be spared. In 
short, the new press has given every satisfaction, and demonstrated that 
every promise its friends make for it, it is capable of redeeming. 

In connection with the press, we have also had built and fitted for us, 
by Messrs. Joshua Hendy & Co., a superior ten-horse power vertical en- 
gine, which implement of motion gives the greatest satisfaction. 

In order to make room for the press, (tad to give further facilities for 
conducting the ever-increasing volume of business, we have found it 
necessary to effect considerable alterations in the business premises. In 
making these alterations we have not been unmindful of comfort. We 
have aimed to make our surroundings as beautiful as possible. In point 
of style and elegance our pressroom has no equal in the universe, our busi- 
ness office is comfortable, convenient and neat, and our private offices are 
artistic elegance itself. The decorating of these rooms we entrusted to 
Mr. Robert Blum, of 120 Kearny street. In carrying out the task en- 
trusted to him Mr. Blum has displayed an artistic conception and his men 
a capacity for execution of which he and they may well be proud. The 
frescoing in the offices to which we are alluding attracts the attention and 
challenges the admiration of all who behold it, and we venture to think 
that no business establishment in this city can boast of rooms as elegantly 
decorated. 

And now one word for the future. After an existence of over a quarter 
of a century, the News Letter will continue to be what it has been — a 
fearless opponent of wrong, and a bright exponent of intelligent public 
opinion. We will endeavor, as we have in the past, to protect, conserve 
and promote the best interests of the community without fear and with- 
out malice. We shall never indorse a wrong because it is popular, or fear 
to indorse a right because it is unpopular. As in the past, so in the 
future, we shall continue to employ the brightest pens to make our pages 
a reflex and mirror of the times, and be at once instructive, amusing, 
piquant, pungent, witty, wise, grave, gay, lively and severe— a brochure 
designed for intellect ual men and women. 

Quicksilver. — The Oranada carried 1,157 lbs. to Mexican ports. 



REMEMBER 

I sat beside the streamlet, 

I watched the water flow, 
As we together watched it 

One little year ago ; 
The soft rain pattered on the leaves, 

The April grass was wet, 
Ah ! folly to remember; 

'Tis wiBer to forget. 

The nightingale made vocal 

June's palace paved with gold ; 
I watched the rose you gave me 

Its warm red heart unfold ; 
But breath of rose and bird's song 

Were fraught with wild regret. 
'Tis madness to remember ; 

'Twere wisdom to forget. 



OR FORGET. 

I stood among the gold corn, 

Alas! no more I knew, 
To gather gleaner's measure 

Of the love that fell from you. 
For me no gracious harvest — 

Would God we ne'er had met! 
'Tis hard, sure, to remember, but 

'Tis harder to forget. 

The streamlet now is frozen, 

The nightingales are fled, 
The cornfields are deserted, 

And every rose is dead. 
I sit beside my lonely tire, 

And pray for wisdom yet — 
For calmness to remember, 

Or courage to forget. 

— Hamilton Aide. 



THE "BULLETIN" m MASK. 

J. P. Cowdery, now City and County Attorney, was formerly a mem- 
ber of the law firm of Preston & Cowdery. Preston has for a long time 
been the private attorney of the Evening Bulletin. When Sand-lot Dunn 
was Auditor, and the Supervisors had fixed the water rates to be paid by 
the city and by private consumers — as the Supreme Court has recently 
decided it was their legal duty to do — that journal advised, and even com- 
manded, the Auditor to refuse to obey the law, or to allow the water bills 
sanctioned by the ordinance. Its purpose was to keep the water question 
unsettled and in agitation, so that rate-payers might not get the relief to 
which they were bylaw entitled, and that property might continue to 
evade payment of its just portion of the cost of the water supply. In 
furtherance of its influence with the Auditor, that paper directed its pri- 
vate attorney, PreBton, to defend the official in his refusal to obey the 
law. The attorney did so, and without charge to the Auditor. Last 
Fall, when an election for city officers took place, Cowdery managed, by 
some hocus-pocuB, to get himself nominated for City Attorney on the 
Republican ticket. The Republican party and all its nominees, excepting 
Cowdery, had declared in favor of the people's right to a reduction of 
water rates by the enforcement of the constitutional provision abolishing 
the free water fraud. Cowdery had been somewhat conspicuous as a Re- 
publican, and was smuggled into a nomination among a score or two of 
nominees for various offices. The Bulletin offered Cowdery its active sup- 
port if he would pledge himself to stand by the water policy it had dic- 
tated. He did so, and, though borne along by the wave of the Republican 
party's success, was elected by a bare majority, the smallest on the ticket. 
He at once set to work to fight the Bulletin's battle on the water question. 
He took issue with the Supervisors and the Auditor, and threw every 
obstacle in the way of their obedience to the Constitution. 

At last the Water Company made a direct application to the Supreme 
Court for a mandamus to compel the authorities to obey the law. The 
Bulletin, behind the mask of its ally, City Attorney Cowdery, did its best 
to retard the proceeding, at the same time using its columns liberally and 
disgustingly to intimidate the Court. After full and exhaustive argu- 
ments and briefs, the Court decided against the Bulletin and Cowdery, 
and in favor of the people, and the abolishment of free water. For so do- 
ing the Bulletin opened on the Judges with insult and threats. It ridi- 
culed their opinions, and falsely charged them with change of front. 
After it had worked off in open assault some of its superabundant bile, 
it went behind its maBk and made a cunning but desperate effort to 
prevent obedience by the authorities to the judgment of the Court, by 
causing its obedient City and County Attorney to file a petition for a 
re-argument of the case. It was a highhanded movement, unauthor- 
ized by the Board, who were ready to obey the mandate of the Court, 
and was evidently made at the suggestion of the Bulletin to forestall the 
Supervisors' official action. Hence on Monday last, by a vote of eleven 
out of the twelve, they directed Mr. Cowdery to withdraw his, but in 
reality the Bulletin's, petition, on the ground that the decision was ac- 
ceptable to the public and satisfactory to the defendant, to wit, the 
Board of Supervisors. At this a volley of editorial abuse besmeared the 
pages of the maddened journal, and the Supervisors were bespattered 
with Bulletin mud and slime. At the same time its voice issues from the 
mask to the effect that, having filed the petition, the application has got 
beyond reach of the people or the Supervisors. It is to be hoped that 
the Court will rebuke this crafty maneuver of a scheming newspaper, 
and, by a summary dismissal of the petition, leave the Bulletin and its 
mask without further power for such dissimulation. 

VERY HEAVY VILLAINS. 
They have some mighty smart journalists at the Antipodes, when it 
comes to working up a live sensation. Among our exchanges is the Eve- 
ning Star, published in Dunedin, New Zealand. Its issue of May 16th 
contains a long account of the Gatherer atrocities, evidently compiled 
from San Francisco papers. The concluding paragraph reads as follows : 

" The Grand Jury found the following indictments against the prisoners : Twenty- 
seven for offenses committed on the high seas, fourteen under the Revenue Laws, 
four for forgery, three for offenses under the postal laws, three for selling liquor to 
Indians, two for cutting timber on Government lands, and one each for counterfeit- 
ing coin, for attempting to bribe a Custom House official, for smuggling and for 
perjury." 

Geewhillikins ! We don't believe that anything could be too bad for 
the mates of the Gatherer, but when it comes to piling all the indictments 
on the Grand Jury's calendar upon two men there is some danger of a 
libel suit. 

Naat, of Harper's Weekly, is a clever caricaturist, but as a prophet he 
does not pan out worth a cent. In the last number of his journal he had 
an illustration representing -John Bull as a lion very poorly disguised in 
a donkey's skin, while Arabi Pasha has him by the nose with one hand, 
and belabors him with a club held in the other. " Remember," says 
J. B., "that I am a real lion." " That may be," answers Arabi, "but 
since you act like an ass I shall treat you as one." Nast must feel like 
kicking himself for not making his picture vice versa, so to speak. 



July 22, 1X82. 



C'ALIFC >KNIA ADVKKTISKK. 



11 



THE TOWN CRIER. 

' Haar tba Criar What iha 4«tiI an tbor *" 

* On» tbat will play iha devil, «>r with yon " 

" Ila'd a • tin* n hi* tail •* ions as a flail. 
Which mad* him trow boldsr and bolder." 

For a being lifted above all other men with a supernaturally keen 
mom of humor and a spirit of sublime nuetioasnsss, commend as to the 
average water cart driver nf Sau Francisco. With mingled awe and ad- 
miration we watched the capers of a good sample of the genus on Mont- 
gomery street the other day. The street i-< I narrow one, and was densely 
crowded. The water-cart wan a monstrous machine which seemed to get 
its pressure from the summit of Telegraph Hill, and which, if driven up 
the middle of Van No.-v* Avenue, wmdd wiuh the front windows of the 
houses on both sides of that broad thorough fare. From hie lofty emi- 
oence, on a level with the roof of the Nevada Hank, the fiend on tbe box- 
seat commanded a splendid view of the situation, and if lie didn't have a 
bully time of it his grinning face belied him. At first he amused 
himself by deluging the street from side to side as he caught a i'ood 
many victims that way; but what with skurrying up side streets and into 
doorways, some few escaped, so the demon changed his tactics. On reach- 
ing a corner he would shut off his hydraulic machine and pul) up. Of 
course, an unsuspecting crowd would soon collect at the obstructed cross- 
ing, and when this included a sufficient number of silk dresses and pol- 
ished boots, the innocent-looking old tank was suddenly transformed into 
a portable Niagara. Then from the higbts above would peal forth a wild, 
weird laugh, and the convulsed waterman would proceed upon his way 
rejoicing. But he had all the fun to himself. 

The penny-a-line ra and facetious editorial writers of the " enterpris- 
ing dailies " have a gloomy prospect before them. The " ocean tramps," 
which have afforded them such splendid opportunities for airing their 
Billingsgate at the expense of absent owners and law-befettered com- 
manders, are gradually leaving our hospitable shores, with the fervently- 
expressed hope on the part of the latter that it may never be their luck to 
return— and the " energetic reporter " will shortly be on bis beam-ends, 
and utterly at a loss for somebody to abuse. The T. C. has nothing to 
say in extenuation of the crimes and misdemeanors laid to the charge of 
the " blarsted " Britisher — by the way, did anyone ever hear an English- 
man use this euphonious word "blarsted"? — but he cannot help record- 
ing his disgust at the currish way in which the commanders of tbe so-called 
"tramp Bteamers," one and all, have been baited by the miserable ink- 
slingers referred to. Nothing would have afforded him greater delight 
than to assist at the castigation of the whole tribe of them, and he is still 
in hope that before the last of the steamers shall have left, some one at 
least of these " funny meu" will receive the licking each and every one of 
theni merits. 

What will the editors do when "Tug" Wilsou, Arabi Pasha and the 
Arctic expedition have grown too stale to write about ? Indeed, the lat- 
ter, though a cold topic, has already begun to show signs of decay. By 
the way, they tell a good story of a brace of editors on an evening pa- 
per, whose proprietors demand their yard of matter daily, or no salary 
will be the penalty. Both these hard-worked scribes found in an Eastern 
paper a long editorial which they thought would make a safe and excellent 

crib." So one copied it in the office, while the other took it home, and 
had it all ready for the next morning. Both handed in their articles ; 
they were both set up, both proofs were sent in to the observant proprie- 
tor, and then there was the deuce to pay. It was Box and Cox in an edi- 
torial room— a singular unanimity of thought and expression that could 
not be explained, for both editors swore the article was original with 
them, and to save his soul the proprietor could not tell which was lying. 
And now he goes about with an abstracted air and his hair has begun to 
fall off from the constant mental effort to unravel the mystery. 

A worthy couple killed their landlord, on Monday, by fracturing his 
skull. This is a rude and clumsy manner of getting rid of that intolerable 
nuisance, a landlord. A much better way is to positively refuse to pay 
him the rent, hire a paralytic old party to stop in the house, proclaim 
that she is a good and virtuous mother, and then seduce the landlord into 
ejecting her. The ejectment accomplished, call upon the reporters of the 
daily press, and inform them of the outrage. Have the scandalous cruelty 
well written up, and the landlord exposed as a monster of iniquity. Then 
everything is all right. He will wear his legs out trotting up and down 
stairs to the newspaper offices, endeavoring to have the item refuted, will 
ruin himself hiring Bohemians to write communications to those journals, 
and finally, heart-broken and disgusted with life, will take to hard drink- 
ing, and wind up in the Insane Asylum or the Morgue. This recipe for 
getting rid of a landlord the T. C. offers freely to the community. He 
has tried it himself, and is now living rent free. 

A certain Person, who shall be otherwise nameless, wants a solicitor 
"full of nervous vital force," which the T. C, takes to be "cheek," a 
quality absolutely indispensible to a canvasser. Candidates with tbe re- 
quisite quantity of this highly desirable commodity appear to be scarce, 
however, as the Person in question has had an advertisement standing in 
the columns of one of the dailies for months past, offering a hundred dol- 
lars a month and pickings to ".the right man." This same Person also 
wants a youth " who has not got one lazy bone in the whole of his an- 
atomical system." Nothing is said about "funny-bones," but the yearned- 
for youth, one would think, would be in hourly danger of having that 
particular portion of his osteological system compoundedly fractured, and 
his risible faculties titillated to the verge of the frantic, should it be his 
fate to be engaged near the person of this eminently funny personage. 

A book has just been published in London telling people "How to 
Manage Cats." The T. C. hails the author as a hero. How to manage a 
thriving colony of cats which nightly congregate beneath his window, be- 
tween the hours of 1 and 4 A. H., and then and there indulge in a dress 
rehearsal of some of Wagners latest gems, has taxed the T. C.'s mental 
powers to the utmost for some time back. Had the publication of the 
valuable work been but a little earlier be might not now be without a 
hair-brush or a boot-jack to his name, or the domicile wherein he resides 
mourn the destruction of its stock of empty bottles, and the marvelous 
consumption on warm Summer nights of the contents of the coal-scuttle. 

It is not generally known that the father of Arabi Bey is an Irishman. 
He is called "Arrah-bedad." 



It wae a case of " drunk and incapable." The offender, a elim, wide- 
awake youth, of the genus hoodlum, was brought into Court in custody 
of a stalwart officer, evidently a recent importation from Pratie-land. 
" State the case," said the Justice, squirting a mouthful of tobacco-juice 
clean across the little court-room. " I will, Yer Worship,* said the loeost 
wielder, with a military salute. "Last avening, about tin o'clock, I 
found the prm'tier at the ba-ar reclining in the cutter, wid his head agin a 
lamp i-ohL I surrounded him, Yer Aimer, an' tuk him in charge." 
"What have you got to say in defence, young man," demanded His 
Honor, "were you drunk, as charged?" "Yer Aimer," returned the 
youth, with a ludicrously exact imitation ef his accuser's tones, " I plead 
guilty to surrounding a quantity of bad Whisky, and throw myself on the 
mercy of the Court." " H'm," said His Honor, discharging a mouthful 
of well-masticated " chewing " into a convenient receptacle by his side, 
" you surrounded the whisky and the officer surrounded yea J is that it* 
Seems to me he's the worse offender of the two. The charge is dismissed. 
Officer, be careful how you surround intoxicated persons in future, or you 
will reuder yourself liable to dismissal from the force tor being drunk 
while on duty." " Mother o' Moses!" ejaculated the bewildered Mile- 
sian, as he slowly passed out of Court, is that the logic of it? Be me 
sowl, this is a great counthry for law ! 

The "drunk and inoapable" episode chronicled above reminds the 
T. C. of an incident that occurred some years ago, in a land where the 
children of the Emerald Isle exercise a sway almost as despotic as that 
they wield over this " God-forsaken counthry." Sergeant O'Flannagan 
was seated at the desk of Station N., busily engaged in booking charges 
against a number of drunks who had been run in on the closing of the 
saloons. One of the inebriates was particularly noisy, and persisted in 
explaining to the representative of lawand order how it was that matters 
stood with him as they did. Wheeling round his chair, the Sergeant cast 
a withering glance on the culprit, and in tones of thunder t- xclaimed : " I 
want nothing but silence, sorr, out of your mouth, and dam'd little of 
that!" 

That extreme modesty and unswerviog veracity form the leading 
traits of the reporters on our local dailies was amply shown by their 
Thursday accounts of the murder of the poor old cobbler, Riley. Each 
one of these " gentlemen of the Press " diffidently intimated to his readers 
that, "though all the other reporters, as well as the police, had failed to 
discover anything more than the bare facts of the murder, yet he (the 
writer), by dint of his superior sagacity and ability in the art of rooting 
up nastiness, was enabled to lay before tbe readers of the Daily Buzzard 
(or the Hyena, or Swill-Tub, as the case might be) all the revolting details 
of this dark deed of blood, together with the true causes that led to the 
tragedy," etc., etc. It is said that when the scribes met at the Press Club 
that evening they greeted each other with an air of cold hauteur that 
would have done credit to a first-class dime-novel hero. 

Certain of the San Jose papers, speaking of the recent visit of the 
First Regiment to that town, are extremely bitter against tbe young la- 
dies of the Garden City, who made themselves agreeable to their military 
guests, accusing them not only of flirting over-boldly, but of very much 
farther exceeding the limits of propriety and decorum. The truth of the 
matter is that the native mashers and lady-killers found themselves com- 
pletely cut out by the gallant soldier boys from 'Frisco, and have taken 
this means of " getting even." Of course, it wasn't pleasant for the local 
irresistibles to be thus frozen out, as it were, by the invading Apollos, 
and had they simply maligned the latter there would be nothing worth 
talking about. But thus to lie — for they do lie — for the purpose of be- 
smirching the good name of their own townswomen, is a revenge that 
could only be devised by spiteful cowards. 

The "world is not altogether bad. Even Chinese and toughs have 
their good traits, though they are precious few. Yesterday morning the 
T. C, in passing down Washington street, witnessed a little incident 
which almost made him believe that the mileunium must be at hand. 
One of two hoodlums, who were seated on an express wagon drawn up in 
front of a fruit-store, dropped his whip. Just at the moment a China- 
man was passing. He stooped, and, unsolicited, picked it up and handed 
it to its owner, who, mirabik dictuf actually thanked him for his cour- 
tesy. What next ? Are the lion and the lamb about to lie down to- 
gether ? 

" Was ye at the ba-all last night, Pat?" "I was, begad." "And 
was the Magruders there ?" " They was, begad ?" " And the Moloneys?" 
" The v was, begad." "And the Bi-annigaus, and the O'Malleys, and 
the Flynns?" "They was, begad." "And is it thrue that the Ma- 
gruders was kicked out?" "They was, begad." "And'tbe O'Malleys 
and the Brannigans ?" " They was, begad." " And the Flynns and the 
Moloneys?" "They was, begad." "And was you kicked out, Pat?" 
"I was, bega-ad." " It must hev been a divartin' intertainment ?" " It 
was, begad." "Will yez drink, Pat?" "I will, bega-a-d!" 

The climate of New Mexico is knocking spots out of theoretical 
physiology and anatomy. A telegram from Santa Fe, in Wednesday's 
Chronicle, informs us that in a row there between two Swedes, named 
Jansen and Bomstein, and another man named Swartore, "the Swedes 
cut Swartore nearly to pieces." One would naturally suppose that was 
the last of Swartore. But in the salubrious atmosphere thereabouts the 
vitality of man seems to be totally independent of his corporeal cohesive- 
ness, for the telegram goes on to state that Swartore in turn killed Jansen 
and mortally wounded Bornstein. 

"God is good and the Devil aint bad," piously ejaculated an un- 
wealthy individual of our acquaintance, as he stopped to pick up a dime 
which had strayed from its owner's pocket. "The ways of Providence 
are inscrutable, I've been praying for a drink the worst kind for the 
last fifteen minutes, and along comes the wherewithal, just as if one was 
an Elijah. This comes of attending the noon-day prayer- meetings of the 
Y. M. C. A." Go thou and do likewise. 

We are told that Abbey, having leased the Lyceum Theatre from 
Irving, will introduce to London play-goers a succession of American 
stars, and among them Willie Edouin. Well, well ! Since when was 
Willie naturalized ? What a revelation his "Yankee twang" will be to 
the London critics, to be sure. 

Sister Stowe indignantly denies that she is looking for a position as 
governess ; she wants to be Governor or nothing— and if nature is capable 
and willing to make the change, the T. C. is quite satisfied that it be made. 



12 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER AND 



July 22, 1882 



SUNBEAMS. 



Dr. Schliemann lives in princely style in 
Athens, in an imposing marble palace. It is said 
that his servants have classic names, and at the 
family table classic Greek alone is Bpoken. And 
this language is also used by the classical servants 
when they get into a row. One day one of them 
was heard to threaten another with, "Dtary up, 
ye dhirty spalpeen, or I'll knock yer two eyes 
into wan!" Classical Greek is a very picturesque 
language. 

A beautiful girl looked out of her window 
one day, and saw her rude brother onthe pave- 
ment, walking about on his hands, with his feet 
up in the air. "Tom," she said, reprovingly, 
" don't, Tom ; I wouldn't do that, Tom— indeed 
I wouldn't." "Wouldn't?" replied the rude 
boy, looking up and speaking with marked and 
malicious emphasis, "Wouldn't? By Jocks, you 
couldn't ! " 

Law and Gospel.— Lawyer Brown is a Sab- 
bath School teacher. He was endeavoring to in- 
cultate into his pupils' minds the necessity of a 
firm belief in things spiritual, when one of the 
class, with open-eyed astonishment, exclaimed: 
"Why, Mr. Brown, I heard you tell a witness 
in court the other day that you didn't care what 
he believed. AH you cared about was what he 
knew." 

Hen's Eggs 1200 years old have been found 
at St. Elio, France. Their usefulness for all pur- 
poses must be considerably impaired. Even as 
"tokens of regard" for presentation to crank 
"Hamlets " they are utter failures. 

Officer of the Prussian Guards, looking at the 
ocean, to bis wife: "Isn't this a glorious sight, 
Minnie ? But the sea seems greatly agitated — 
probably has never before seen an officer of the 
Prussian Guards." 

The fact that a book agent is down with the 
small-pox at Fort Worth will cause the organiza- 
tion of an ti- vaccination societies all over Texas. 




BROAD GAVOE. 

SUMMER ARRANGEMENT. 

Commencing Monday. April 10* 1882, 

And until further notice, Passenger Trains mil leave 
from, and arrive at San Francisco Passenger Depot 
(Townsend Bt., between 3d and Jthstreets,) as follows: 



LEAVE 
S. F. 




DESTINATION. 


J ARRIVE 

1 s. r. 


8:30 a.m. 


f 




\ | 0:40 a.m. 


t 9:30 A M. 




| * 8:10 a.m. 


10:40 A.M. 


1 




9.03 A.M. 


* 3:30 P.M. 




.San Mateo, Redwood,. 


.. ! |o10:02a.m. 


4:25 p.m. 


■\ 


and Menlo Park 


f ,» 3:30 P.M. 


* 5:15 r.M. 






t 4:59 P.M. 


6:30 r.M. 






| i 6:00 P.M. 




V 




J t 8:15 P.M. 



8:30 a.m 

10:40 a.m. 

* 3:30 P.M. 

4:25 p.m. 



( \ 

\ ..Santa Clara, San Jose and, . i 
I ..Principal Way Stations 

i 



-J 



03 a.m 
02 a.m. 
;36 p.m. 
00 p.m. 
15 p.m. 



10:40 a.m. 
* 3:30 p.m 



j . Gilroy, Pajaro. Castroville Mj"l 
| and Salinas. ( \ 



):02 A M. 
>:00p.m. 



10:40 a.m.i 
* 3:30 p.m. 



. .Hollister and Tres Pinos.. 



n 



;02a m. 
00 P.M. 



I j - ...Monterey, Watdonviue . i 
-j Camp Goodall, Aptos, Camp ,- 
I (San Jose,Soquel,Sauta Cruz. J 

10:40 a.m. . . .Soledad and Way Stations . . . 



10:40 a.m 
# 3.30 P.m 



):02 a.m. 
J:00 p u. 



•Sundays excepted, t Sundays only. 



££T Special Notice. T^ 
SUNDAY Excursion Trains to Monterry and Santa 
Cruz. — First-class Excursion Train to Monterey and 
Santa Cruz will leave San Francisco every Sunday at 
7:30 a.m. Returning, leave Monterey at 4:35 r.M.; S<m- 
ta Cruz at 4:15 p.m., arriving San Francisco at 8:40 p.m. 
Fare for the Bound Trip to either point, $3. 



Stage connections are made with the 10:40 a.m. 
Train, except Pescadero Stages via San Mateo, which 
connect with 8:30 a.m. Train. 



Ticket Offic as— Passenger Depot, Townsend street, 
and No. 2 New Montgomery street, Palace Hotel. 
A. C. BASSETT, H. R. JUDAH, 

Superintendent. Asst. Pass. & Tkt. Agt, 

J3T* S. P. Atlantic Express Train via Los Angeles, 
Yuma, etc., leaves San Francisco daily via Oakland 
Ferry, foot of Market street, at 9:30 A.M. 



C. P. R . R. 

Time Schedule, Monday, May 15, 1882. 

Trains leave, and are due to arrive at, 

San Francisco as follows: 



LEAVE 

(for) 



DESTINATION. 



( ARRIVE 

\ (from) 



9:30 a.m. 
*4:00p.m. 
•4:30 p.m. 

8:00 a.m. 

3:30 P.M. 
«4:30 p.m. 

8:00 A.M. 
*4:00p.m. 

9:30 a.m. 

4:30 p.m. 

8:00 a.m 
•4:00 p.m. 

8:00 a.m. 
*4:80p.M. 
18:00 a.m. 

0:30 A.M. 

8:00 A.M. 

5:00 p.m. 

9:30a.M. 
♦4:00 P.M. 

8:00 a.m. 

8:0o a.m. 
10:00 a.m 

3:00 p.m. 

6:00 P.M. 

3:30 r.M 

6:30 p.m. 

8:00 A.M. 

8:00 A.M. 

8:00 a.m. 

3:30 p.m. 
*4:30 p.m. 
*4:00p.m. 

8:00 a.m 

3:00 p.m. 

8:00 a.m. 

9:30 a.m. 

3:30 P.M. 
*4:00p.m. 
*4:S0 p.m. 

3:30 p.m. 

8:00 a.m. 
*i :30 p.m. 
*s:0Oa.m. 



.Antioch and Martinez.... 



. . . Calistoga and No pa 

. 1 Deming, El Paso ^ Express.. 

. \ and East f Emigrant 

. ( Gait and } via Livermore 

. "} Stockton i via Martinez 

...lone 

. . . Knight's Landing- 

*' " ({Sundays only) 

...Los Angeles and South 

. . Livermore and Pleasanton 



.Madera and Frcsnr 



. Marysville and Cbico 

.Nilesand Haywards.... 



. t Ogden and ( Express 

. j East 1 Emigrant ....,.., 

..Redding and Red Bluff 

. | Sacramento, 1 via Livermore, 

. -. Colfax and .-via Benicia 

. ( Alta ) via Benicia 

. . . Sacramento, via Benicia. . . . 
. . , Sacramento River Steamers . . 
...San Jose 



. Vallejo.. 



({Sundays only).. 



. Virginia City.. 
.Woodland 



. . . Willows and Williams 



2:40 p.m. 
*12:40p.m. 
•10:10 A.M. 

7:40 p.m. 
11:40 a.m. 
*10:10 A.m. 
*10:10 a.m. 

7:40 p.m. 

2:40 p.m. 

7:10 a.m. 

5:40 p.m. 
•12:40 p.m. 

5:40 p.m. 
■"'10.10 a.m. 
111:40 a.m. 

2:40 p.m. 

5:40 P.M. 

K:40 A.m. 

2:40 p.m. 
*12:40 p.m. 

5:40 p.m. 

5:40 P.M. 

4:10 P.M. 

9:40 a.m. 

8:40 A.M. 
11:10 a.m. 

6:10 a.m. 

5:40 p.m. 

6:40 p.m. 

7:40 P.M. 
11:40 A.M. 
♦10:10 a.m. 
*6:00 A.M. 

4:10 P.M. 

9:40 A.m. 

7:40 P.M 

2:40 p.m. 
{11:40 a.m. 
•12.40 P.M. 
♦10:10 a.m. 
11:40 a.m. 
♦7:40 P.M. 
'■'10:10 A.M. 
•7:40 p.m. 



Train leaving San Francisco at 9:30 A.M. should meet 
Pacific Express from " Ogden " at San Pablo ; alBO Pacific 
Express from "El Paso" at Antiooh. 



LOCAL FERRY TRAINS, 
Via Oakland Pier. 



From '-SAN FRAJfCISCO," Daily. 



To BAST OAKLAND— »0.00, '6:30, 7:30, 8:30, 9:30 

10:30, 11:30, 12.30, 1.30, 2:30, 3:30, 4:30, 5:30, 6:30, 

7:00, 8:00, 9:30, 11:00, »12:00. 
To ALAMEDA— *6:00, "16:30, 7:00, »+7:30, 8:00, "t8:30, 

9:00, "t9:30, 10:00, 11:00, 12:00, 1:00, 2:00, 3:00, '<tS:30, 

4:00, *t4:S0, 5:00, «t5:30, 0:00, «t6:30, 7:00, '8:00, 9:30, 

11:00, »12:00. 
To BERKELEY — «6:00, »6:30. 7:00, '7:30, 8:00, »S:30, 

9:00, t«:30, 10:00, 110:30, 11:00, (11:30, 12:00, 1:00, 

2:00, 3:00, 4:00, 4-30, 6:00, 5:30, 6:00, 6:30, 7:00, 8:00, 

9:30, '12:00. 
To WEST BERKELEY— »6:00, »6:30, 7:00, "7:30, (8:00. 

'8:30. 9:00, 10:00, 11:00, 2:00, 3:00, 4:00, ! '4:30, 5:00. 

•5:30, 6:00. <KS:30, 7:00. 



To " SAN FRANCISCO." Daily. 



FnoM BROADWAY, Oakland -»5:32, »6:02, 6:32,7:02, 

7:32, 8:02, 8:32. 9:02, 9:32, 10:02, 10:32, 11:02, 11:32, 12:02, 

12:32, 1:02, 1:32, 2:02, 2:32, 3:02, 3:32, 4:02, 4:32, 5:02, 

5:32, 6:02, 6:32, 7:02, 8:02, 9:32, 11:02. 
From EAST OAKLAND-»5:21. »5:51, 6:21,6:51,7:51, 

8:51, 9:51, 10:51, 11:51, 12:51, 1:51, 2:51, 3:51, 4:51, 

5:51, 6:51, 7:51, 9:21, 10:51. 
From ALAMEDA— »5:15, -6:45, 6:16, 7:10, *t7:S5, 8:10, 

»t8:35, 9:10, »t9:35, 10:10, "tl0:35, 11:10, 12:10, 1.10, 

2:10, 3:10, 4:10, <t4:35, 5:10, »+5:35, 6:10, °t6:35, 7:15, 

<>t7:35, 9:15. 10:46. 
From BERKELEY— »5:45, »6:15, 6:45, "7:15,7:45, *8:15, 

8:46, (9:16, 9:45, [10:15, 10:45, (11:16, 11:45, 12:45. 

1:45, 2:45, 3:45, 4:15, 4:45,5:15,5:45,6:16,6:46, 7:45. 

9:15, *10:45. 
From WEST BERKELEY — *5:45, *6:15, 6:45, '7:15. 

7:45, 8:46, 9:45, 10:45, 1:45, 2:45, 3:45, 4:45, »5:15, 5:45 

«6:15, 6:45, '7:15. 



Creek Route. 

From SAN FRANCISCO— *7:15, 9:15, 11:15, 1:15, 3:15 

5:15. 
From OAKLAND-»6:15. 8:15. 10:15. 12:16. 2:15. 4:15. 



All trains run daily, except when star (*) denotes San 
days excepted. 

tTrains marked thus (t) run via East Oakland. 
(t)S unda ys only. 



" Standard Time" furnished by Randolph & Co., Jew 
elers, 101 and 103 Montgomery St., S. F. 

T. H. GOODMAN, Gen. Pass, and Ticket Agt. 
A. N. Townr, General Manager. 



L. H, Newton. M. Newton 

NEWTON BROTHERS & CO., 

Importers and Wholesale Dealers In 
Teas, Foreign Goods and Groceries, 204 and 306 
California street, San Francisco, Cal May 25. 




On and after Monday, April 3d, 1882, 
Boats and Trains will leave San Francisco as 
follows: 



7"| f\ a.m. daily (Sundays excepted), via San Rafael, 
* J- " from Market-street wharf, for Petaluma, San- 
ta Rosa, Healdsburg, Clovcrdale, Guerneville and way 
stations. Stages connect at Geyserville for Skaggs" 
Springs; and at Cloverdale for Highland Springs, Kel- 
seyville, Soda Bay, Lakeport, Ukiah and Geysers. 



Dally, Except Sundays. 

2 0{\ r.M., via Donahue, from Washington-street 
.OU w i iar f 

rXf\ r.M., via San Rafael, from Market-street wharf, 
*-*\J for Petaluma, Cloverdale and way stations. 
Stages for Navarro Ridge and Mendocino City leave 
Cloverdale daily at 6 a.m. 

Sunday Excursions. 

8 0fl A.M., Sundays only, via Donahue, from Wash- 
• «v ing ton-street wharf, for Cloverdale and way 
stations. Round Trip Tickets on Sundays to Petaluma, 
SI. 50; Santa Rosa, $2 ; Healdsburg, & ; Cloverdale, 
S4.50; Guerneville, S3. Returning, will arrive in San 
Francisco at 6:45 p.m. 



ST ft a.m., Sundays only, via San Rafael, from Mar- 
• J-U ket-street wharf, for Miller's, Pacheeo, Novato 
and Burdell's. Returning, will arrive in San Francisco 
at 7:45 p.m. 

GEYSERS! GEYSERS! 

The Greatest Natural Wonder of the 

World 1 

Immense Reduction in Rates. 

Round Trip Tickets, via Cloverdale S3 50 

Rouud Trip Tickets, via Cloverdale and Calistoga. $12 50 



Passengers will leave San Francisco at 7:10 a.m. 
week days, from San Quentin Ferry, and arrive at the 
Geysers at 3:30 p.m. On Sundays, leave Washington- 
street Wharf, by Steamer JaMKS M. DONAHUE, at 
8:20 a.m. Returning, arrive in San Francisco by either 
route the following evening. 



PETER J. McGLYNN, 
Gen. Pass. & Tkt. Agt. 



ARTHUR HUGHES, 
Gen. Manager. 



SONOMA VALLEY RAILROAD. 



O' 

follows: 



and after Monday, April 3d, 1882, 

Boats and Trains will leave San Francisco as 



2 f\ p. m. daily (Sundays excepted) , from Washing- 
• 0\J ton-street Wharf, for the town of Sonoma. 
Fare, $1. Round Trip Tickets, from Saturday till Mou- 
day, ?1 50. 

SUNDAY EXCURSIONS. 

8 0A A.M. (Sundays only), from Washington-street 
.£\J Wharf, for the town of Sonoma. Round Trip 
Tickets, SI- 



ARTHUR HUGHES, 
Gen. Manager. 



PETER J. McGLYNN, 
Gen. Pass. & Tkt. Agt. 



H. S. Williams. A. Ohesebrougt. 

"W.H.Dimond. 

WILLIAMS, DIMOND & CO., 

Shipping and Commission Merchants, 

UNION BTJTXDING, 

Junction Market and Fine Streets. 

AGENTS FOR 

Pacific Mail Steamship Company, Pacific 
Steam Navigation Company, The Ca- 
nard Royal Mail Steamship Company, 
' ' The California Line of Clippers ' ' 
from New York and Boston, 
and * ' The Hawaiian Line . ' ' 
San Francisco, January 31, 1830. [Jan. 31. 



A periodical says that a tall eastern girl 
named short long loved a big Mr. Little, while 
Mr. Little, thinking little of short, loved a little 
lass named Long. To make a long story short, 
Little proposed to Long and Short longed to be 
even with Little's shortcomings, so Short meet- 
ing Long, threatened to marry Little before Long 
which caused Little in a very short time to marry 
Long. Query — Did tall Short love big Little 
less because Little loved Long ? 



July 22, 1*82. 



CALIFOKNIA ADVERTISER. 



13 




"The World," the Flesh, and the Devil. 

I By a Truthful Penman. 1 

An extraordinary case of suicide has occurred tit Vineennes. M. 
IWuglet, a vendor of toys, gave a dinner at which his wife and several 
children, hia father-in-law and brother-in-law were present. Toward the 
end of the meal a discussion on family affaire took place, followed by a 
good deal of quarreling. Suddenly M. Beuglet left the room for a few 
moments, returned with a loaded revolver, and in the very midst of hia 
family shot himself twice in the breast. Death was instantaneous.^— 
Under the treaty of commerce which has just been negotiated by Com- 
modore Shufeldt with Corea, our Government will have a minister, con- 
sul-general and several consuls in that country. Corea is rich in metals, 
produces silk and other articles common to Mongolian countries, and the 
trade is likely to be quite important. The people resemble both Chinese 
and Japanese, number between 10,000,000 and '20,000,000, and have here- 
tofore rigidly excluded visitors and even killed those cast upon their shores 
by accident.— A lady and gentleman named Rogers, of Hereford, 
England, who were married recently, went to Weymouth to spend their 
honeymoon. They took a trip in a sailing-boat with a waterman. The 
boat had not left the beach more than fifteen minutes before she was seen 
to capsize and the three were drowned. Now Mississippi River news- 
papers want the general government to build levees with the money real- 
ized from the tax imposed on raw cotton after the war, on the ground 
that the tax was illegal, and a bill- has been introduced into Congress to 
carry the idea into effect. But, allowing that the money was unjustly 
taken, and that Uncle Sam has partitions in bis pockets, why not say that 
it waa paid out long ago on some unjust demand — the Halifax business or 
some Southern claims, for instance 1— Springfield Republican. > A Lon- 
don letter to the Liverpool Mercury says that Mr. Parnell is hard up for 
money, and that his estate of '* Avondale " is now attached for £30, the 
interest on a £10,000 mortgage. " Avondale " is in County Wicklow, 
among the Wicklow mountains, and from the mansion-house are seen 
charming reaches of forest, river and valley. In whatever mysterious di- 
rection a great part of the Land League funds may have blown, it is cer- 
tain that they did not settle in Parnell's pockets, -^Robert Bonner has 
put $382,000 into horse-flesh since 1859. In that year he paid 59,000 for 
the famous team, " Lantern " and " Light." In 1864 " Pocahontas," who 
had a record of 2:26|, was sold to him for S40.000, " Dexter" cost him 
$35,000, " Edward Everett " S20.000, " Startle" the same sum," " Rarus" 
represents $36,000, and his latest purchase is that of " Keene Jim " for 
$4,000.— —The laat rail of the Canadian Pacific Railroad between Prince 
Arthur's Landing and Winnipeg, Man., was laid three weeks ago, and 
the eastern territory now has communication with the Prairie province, 
practically independent of United States railroads.^— Coarjg Tsung 
Liang, attache" of the Chinese Legation, says that China will return fifty 
students to American colleges, having discovered that their removal was 
a mistake. ^^A negro minister of Alexandria, Va., was lately fined $4 
for whipping his wife, and he raised the money by passing the plate after 
preaching a sermon from the text, " Whom the Lord loveth he chasten- 
eth." The preacher had to pass the plate Bix times before enough wealth 
flowed in, but his fervent appeal did the business.— 'The alumni of 
Cornell University, who last year failed in an attempt to secure what 
they consider their rightful authority in the management of college affairs, 
have just won a practical victory in the election of John De Witt War- 
ner as alumni trustee.— —The Grecian Theatre and the adjoining tav- 
ern, well known as the "Eagle," City-road, London, whicb was put up to 
auction a Bhort time ago, and bought in at a reserve price of -3105,000, 
has, it is said, been purchased by the Salvation Army for §115,000, for 
use as a public meeting-place and congress hall.^— President Arthur 
has made up a board of Government directors of the Union Pacific Rail- 
road on the broadest bouffe basis. It consists of ex-Senator Spencer, of 
Alabama, carpet-bag Stalwart, Ike Bromley, journalist, R. H. Baker, of 
Wisconsin, G. H. Haven, of New York, and Watson Parrish, of Ne- 
braska.— Florida people have found that sponges grow at tbe rate of 
an inch a month, and sponge beds are being established at Pine Key, on a 
plan similar to that of the oyster-beds.— Ever since 1857 the produc- 
tion of gold in Australia has been decreasing. The production in the five 
years ending 1861 was £62,162,000; in the next five, ending 1866, £61,894,- 
000; in the next, ending 1871, £51,858,000; iu the five years ending 1881, 
£32,016,000. The population of the Australian Colonies has increased 
three-fold since 1857. ^^Thackeray's picture of the abject servility of the 
British public is as absolutely true now as it was forty years ago: Suppose 
he is a nobleman of a jovial turn, the public will sympathize good-na- 
turedly with his amusements, and say he is a hearty, honest fellow. Sup- 
pose he is fond of play and the turf, and has a fancy to be a blackleg, the 
public will fawn on him, and many honest people will court him, as they 
would court a housebreaker if he happened to be a Lord. Suppose he is 
an idiot, yet, by the glorious constitution, he is good enough to govern 
us ; he may be an ass, and yet respected ; or a ruffian, and yet be exceed- 
ingly popular ; or a rogue, and yet excuses will be found for him. Snobs 
will still worship him. ^— The Queen s present to her great-grandson, 
the Prince Frederick William Victor, was a massive Queen Anne loving- 
cup, and Princess Christian sent a gold horse-shoe, set in pearls, and 
bearing the words " Good Luck" in diamonds. —Irish folk in London 
give very gloomy accounts of their country. Emigration is going on with 
extraordinary rapidity, in small towns especially. The worst of it is that 
the people who are leaving are the bone and sinew and intelligence of the 
land. It is not the farmers without farms, or the shop-keepers without 
shops ; but it is, in a large majority, the well-to-do intelligent people 
with a little money, who see no happy future for themselves in their own 
country. 



COAL AND WOOD, 

Wholesale and Retail, 

At the Old Number 209 Sansome Street. 

GEORGE H. HUNT & CO. 

«r Any Artio'e In the Line Supplied. Mi 
"»"••'' *■ Telephone No. 831. 



ROEDERER CHAMPACNE! 

NOTICE. 
The Trade and the Public are Informed that we Receive the 

GENUINE 

LOUIS ROEDERER CARTE BLANCHE CHAMPAGNE, 

Direct from Mr. Louis Roederer, Reims, 
Over his Signature and Consular Invoice. 

^g 1 * Each case is marked upon the side, "Macondray & Co., San Fran- 
cisco," and each bottle bears the label, '* Macondray & Co., Sole Agents 
for the Paciflo Ooast.^ 

MACONDRAY & CO., 

Sole Agents for the Pacific Coast. 

[September 24.] 



M. A. GUNST & CO., 

203 Kearny Street San Francisco. 

IMPORTERS AND DEALERS IN 
HAVANA AND KEY WEST CIGARS, 

Also, Agents for Kimball. Gaulliener & Co.'s Guatemala Cigars. 
%W~ Inform the Public that they receive large invoices of Choice 
Havana Rranda ttciee a month. LFelj. 19. 

C. ADOLPHE LOW & CO., 

Commission Merchants, 

I SAN FRANCISCO and NEW ?OMK. 

&ST" Agents of American Sugar Refinery, corner of Union and Battery streetB, 
, San Francisco, California. Jan. 17. 

Olatts Spreckels. Wm. Q-, Irwin. 

WM. 0. IRWIN & CO., 

Sugar Factors and Commission Agents* 

Honolulu, H. I. TMarch 26. 

J. 0. SPRECKELS & BROS., 

Shippin and Commission Merchants- 
Hawaiian Xdne of Packets. 

325 Market Street San Francisco. 

May 28 . 

CALIFORNIA SUGAR REFINERY, 

Manufacturers of tbe Standard Syrup, a superior article 
put up in barrelB expressly for home consumption. Also, Extra Heavy Syrup 
in barrels for Export. Refined Sugars at lowest market rates. Office 325 Market 
street, up stairs Dec. 21. 

J. W. Sheeny. J. 0. 0'Oonnor. 

O'CONNOR & SHEEHY, 

Un dertaker s , 

Removed to 767 Mission street, between Tbird aud fourth . 
Every requisite for Funerals furnished at the Lowest RateB and in the Best 
Manner. April 29. 

GEORGE C. HICKOX & CO., 

STOCK BROKERS. 

No. 314 Pine Street San Francisco. 

[May 20.] 

ALASKA COMMERCIAL COMPANY, 

No. 310 Sanaome Street, 

San Francibco, 

WHOLESALE DEALERS IN FUSS. 

[September 21.1 

JOSEPH GILLOTT'S STEEL PENS. 

Gold Medal, Paris, 1S7S. 

Sold by all Stationers. Sole Agent for the United States: 
MR. HENKT HOE, 91 John street, N. Y. Jan. 6. 

C. W. M. SMITH, /^x~ 

The Leading and Oldest Patent Solicitor, /^^Sutv\ 

Established in 18G2, \tj£^P^j)/ 

Removed to ,..224 San-some Street. ^^M^X 

^g" MR. 0. W. M. SMITH is the patent attorney for Marriott's Aeroplane Com- 
pany for Navigating the Air. Oct. 22. 

TABER, HARKER & CO., 

IMPORTERS AND WHOLESALE GROCERS, 
108 and 110 California St., S. F. 

[April 19.] 



14 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER AND 



July 22, 1882 



LOCAL NOTES. 

Burglar captured in a hotel on Brannan street. A number of blood- 
thirsty bed-bugs, who live in the same house, are still at large.— »U. S. 
ship-of-war Iroquois sails on an extended cruise to Vallejo. Goes ashore 
twice on the way up, and tears up the gas-pipe between Mare Island and 
Vallejo. Very dangerous vessel — to herself . — — French fellow- citizens 
take theBastile; also various liquid and other refreshments. -^—Corn- 
doctor Wetberbee, who tried to kill a retailer of cocktails, attempts to 
climb the golden stairway in the City Prison. ^— Man rents a store at the 
corner of Montgomery and Pacific streets, borrows money from all the 
neighbors, and then vanishes. Fair day's business.— • Attorney Coffey 
says his client, Mrs. Parker, deceived him, and he charges her with perjury. 
The fair deceiver and the susceptible lawyer !— Canavan, a shoulder- 
hitter and pot-house politician, strikes Capt. Roper, of the A njerHead, with 
a cane, which piece of blackguardism Beems to give the Chronicle joy. ■ — 
Fire on Spear street. "The flames raged furiously," of course. They 
always "rage" at picnics of thiB kind.— Policeman fires five shots at a 
hack-driver because the latter didn't have his lamps lit. Fair sample of 
the Force.-^— Another member of the Escambia's crew floats ashore. Too 
late for the investigation.^^ At a meeting of Dennis Tonhy's Land 
League, a man named Tobin avers his belief in physical force. In other 
words, he believes in behind-the-hedge assassination — provided he is not 
the victim.— Louis McLane wins his Placerville Railroad case. That is, 
he wins an opportunity for the other Bide to appeal.^— Academy of Sci- 
ences meets and talks bugology, etc.^— Supervisors direct the City and 
County Attorney to withdraw his petition for the reopening of the Water 
suits. Call and Bulletin howl. Pity they were not the Supreme Court, 
Board of Supervisors and everything else.^— Mint changes coiners. E. 
F. White steps out, C. M. Gorham in, and Frank Page smiles audibly. 
'Nother echo from Guiteau's pistol. ^— Man strangles himself to death in 
the Lindell House. Nobody knows why, and he can't enlighten the curi- 
ous. ^—Barnard, formerly of the Rubs House, who disappeared mysteri- 
ously in Philadelphia, turns up again. Too much booze. -^Carpenter, 
named Kelly, falls off the roof of a house eighty feet high. Widow and 
four children regret that the house was so high.— British steamer Mala- 
bar arrives from China with 795 disciples ol Confucius, who want to be 
Christianized.— Still another of the Escambia's crew floats ashore. The 
shrimps must be on a strike.^— A Frenchman and an American woman 
solve the great mystery with the aid of poison.— ^Chinese employees of 
a cigar manufactory raise a riot, which the blue-coated guardians of the 
peace quell.— Board of Directors of the Immigration Association meet. 
Secretary reports the receipt of money letters. Better call it the Letter 
Association.^— J. C. Duncan's trial begins in Department 12, Superior 
Court— The purchasers of the wrecked Escambia undertake to raise 
her. Heaps of money in it if they succeed. ^— Produce Exchange holds 
its annual meeting and elects officers. Man murdered by his sister and 
her husband; but let us not judge the murderers too harshly. The poor 
things should be pitied, not punished.—— President of the Board of 
Trade telegraphs to Congressman Page, and expresses the hope that he 
and the balance of the national law-makers heard the echo from the 
British gunB at Alexandria, and that they will consider said echo to be 
a good and sufficient reason for helping through the Nicaragua steal. 
Lick Trustees commence suit against the Pioneers. This is the result of 
the Pioneers expressing dissatisfaction with management of Lick Trust. 

Judge Halsey gets foul of the V. S. District Court.— W. W. 

Hoover, of this city, nominated by President Arthur for Associate 
Justice Supreme Court of Arizona. — Lots of new evidence taken in the 
opium case. Chinese evidence, though.^— Ocean Shore Railroad Com- 
pany elects officers. Where is the road, though? 



PACIFIC COAST AND EASTERN NOTES. 

A pair of horses with a wagon behind them trot a mile in 2:16£ 
minutes, in New York. A defaulting bank cashier can make better time 
than that.— A dog and three men shot in Texas. The dog will be 
missed.^— Five fires at the same time in one section of New York, and 
not one Irish patriot burned up. Two Texan farmers fight with knives ; 
both killed. Darwin's law of the survival of the fittest being in force 
there, neither survived. ^— The Independent Republicans of Pennsylvania 
won't entertain Don Cameron's overtures. The tragedy follows the over- 
ture.^— Prohibition fight in Nebraska. The goody-goodies of that State 
want to be prohibited lest they drink too much. -^—Politicians say that 
the shooting of Colonel Blair in South Carolina was murder. If politics 
were out of the case they would say it was a joke.— Jim Keene pur- 
chases an " apartment" house in New York; also a dozen of cambric 
handkerchiefs. i Man hanged in Dakota for murdering his wife three 
years ago. In California we would wait thirty-three years before com- 
mitting such an outrage.-^— Congress votes Mrs. Garfield S50.000, and 
leaves her to fight off the medical sharps who attended the late President. 
■ Congress went into Committee of the Whole on River and Harbor 
Bill. Drew the hole in after it. Rivers and harbors may drown the 
whole lot. ^—Stockton boy shoots himself with a "toy pistol." That's 
what "toy pistols" are made for. ■ A mule kicks a RobertB Island 
farmer in the face. If it had only kicked him somewhere else it might 
have knocked sense into him!— Truckee policeman smashes a man's skull 
with a rock. King David, of Biblical fame, did the same thing. ^— Peta- 
luma Woolen Mill starts working again. ^—Democratic primary held in 
Fresno. District Attorney and Sheriff have a tight. Sheriff draws a 
pistol to shoot District Attorney. Model pair of law officers. ^—Irish- 
man drowns himself in Sutter County. If the coming election Bhould be 
very close that one vote may lose the Democracy the State.— —Mike 
Davitt sails for Europe. Same ship holds the whole of him.-^— James 
Haynes, of Laredo, Texas, shoots the seducer of his thirteen -year- old 
sister, District Attorney Cummins. Who blames him ?^— Two thousand 
acres of growing grain destroyed by a storm in Dakota. Big batch of 
bread lost. ^— Mayor and members of the City Council of Leadville fined 
$250 each and sent to jail for ten days for contempt of Court. That's the 
kind of gruel which makes public officials recollect that they don't own 
the country.— Steam yacht runs through a steamboat on the Hudson. 
Who will pay for that race ?— -The whole Pacific Coast delegation unites 
in recommending the President to appoint General G. M. Sabin U. S. 
District Judge of Nevada. When they do agree their unanimity is de- 
lightful.— Duel in the Old Dominion. Woman in the fence, of course. 
•—•President Lincoln's widow dies. Presidents' widows always do 



die.^— The New York money market is easy ; so are the last 
pair of slippers sent to President Arthur by the matrimonially in- 
clined females who gaze languidly at the White House. — A Water 
Company formed in New York, for the purpose of supplying Sac- 
ramento and other Californian cities with that useful liquid. Game of 
bluff.— —Band of armed tramps try tt> capture locomotive in Nevada. 
Railroad men draw guns and the tramps utilize what locomotive power 
their legs possess.— The Drinoipals at a prize fight near Philadelphia and 
two reporters arrested. The publishers who print full reports of these 
disgusting exhibitions should also be arrested.— Wolf, American Con- 
sul-General to Egypt, gives Arabi Pasha a good character, but who will 
vouch for Wolf's ?^— Six Cincinnati boys, who fooled with the Fourth- 
of-July pistol, die from the effects of lock-jaw. There are no pistols in 
the country to which they have emigrated.^— -The crop prospects in 
Kansas, Illinois, Indiana and Minnesota are said to be excellent. ^—Chi- 
cago grain operator fails and the event operates on the market like physic. 
—Robeson is called a thief, a liar and a perjurer on the floor of the 
House of Congress.— Senator Kellogg says he didn't steal any of the 
Star Route funds. All the accused persons have, so far, denied the ac- 
cusation with unanimity. But the money is gone.^— Ocean Shore Rail- 
road bill to be favorably reported to the Senate. The devil looks after 
his own.— —Arizona cowboy commits suicide. Got lost in the brush and 
preferred that to starving to death.— A brutal prize fight in New York 
City, between " Tug " Wilson and Sullivan. Sixteen thousand people, 
including C. A. Dana, of the Sun, present.— Frank Pixley, a drunken 
tramp, run over by the cars near Chico. The other Pixley is still alive. 
-^— A two-hundred pound Eureka miner falls sixty feet. Place he fell 
badly hurt ; miner all right. —Merchants of New York mandamus the 
N. Y. C. R. R. and the Erie R. R., to compel those corporations to em- 
ploy men to handle and forward freight. The movement of freight is 
man-damned by a strike.^— A New York firm of importers caught de- 
frauding the Government. Stealing from the Government is accounted 
honorable enterprise.— -Three men in New Mexico fight for a blanket. 
One killed and the other two carved up. Was the blanket worth it ?— 
lane of steamers about to be laid on between the Atlantic terminus of 
the Southern Pacific Railroad and England.— —The salmon catch on the 
Pacific Coast i« a failure this year.^— Somebody suggests Grant for Gov- 
ernor of New York. Grant us a rest - from Grant. — New Orleans and 
Texas R. R. completed. ^—Remains of Mrs. Lincoln laid away at rest. 
Brave Bear, who was to have been made a good Indian, by hanging, 
is respited. —The sister of the late Cornelius Vanderbilt withdraws her 
objections to his will. This makes the day frigid for the lawyers.-^— An- 
other Apache picnic in Arizona. Big thunder and hail storms in Siski- 
you and Mendocino counties. Kind of Hail Columbia.— Another fire 
in Tombstone. Keeps firing away. — Man dies of old age on the steamer 
between San Francisco and Oregon. Steamer better get fresh engines. 
-^Clergyman's barn struck by lightning and his cow killed. If it had 
been Bob Ingersoll's property ?— Senator Ben Hill packing his trunk 
for heaven. ^— The Ohio Democracy nominates a State ticket and adopts 
a platform which speaks well of the Democratic party.-^The living 
shadow named A. H. Stevens nominated for the Governorship of Geor- 
gia.^— "Miss Fannie Parnell dies suddenly, at Bordentown, N. J. 

FOREIGN NOTES. 

Sixteen Irish counties and parts of two others "proclaimed," under 
the Repression Bill — and the villain still pursued her.— Mexican paper 
attacks American railroad projects. So long as it does not attack Gen. 
Grant and the other projectors, the country is safe. ^— John Bright resigns. 
Believes that the British Government should have sent Quaker mission- 
aries, instead of heavy bombs, to convert Arabi Pasha. 'A woman 
murdered in Ireland. The murderers don't like the Repression Bill.^— 
American marines land in Alexandria in order to help the British in es- 
tablishing law and order, and Dennis Toohey, Bob Ferral,and every other 
" chaw " in America Btand aghast. A declaration of war from the Irish 
Republic maybe expected everyday.— Walsh, the man who was arrest- 
ed in connection with the arms seized in Clerkenwell, has been committed 
for trial on a charge of treason-felony. Poor pat riot ! Distinguished 
martyr !—— Treasurer Egan states that hatred of England is the strength 
of the Land League. Curious kind land law reform it must be after if 
this is bo.— French Ministry resigns. Want a little coaxing.— A R. R. 
car in Ireland broken into and a large number of Government rifles and 
amunition stolen. When such property is left unguarded it ought to be 
Btolen.— Big fire in Smyrna. Six thousand people burned out, not one 
burned in.— Earthquake in Mexico. People quake, too ; you bet.— 
Arabi Pasha ruts the fresh water canal at Alexandria. Don't like clean 
water. — Crops in the northwest of Ireland in a bad condition. Bog 
oranges blighted.— French ministerial crisis over. Ministry got the 
tickling they wanted.^— Russian Colonel degraded and sent to Siberia. 
Not brutal enough with Nihilist prisoners. -^Turkey offers to join a fresh 
international conference on European affairs. Considerate. 

THE "RURAL HOME." 
One of tbe most pleasant resorts in the immediate neighborhood 
of San Francisco is the "Rural Home," which is presided over by Mrs. 
BriggB. The " Rural Home" is located on the line of the South Pacific 
Coast Railroad (narrow gauge), between Schuetzen Park and the Long 
Branch Baths. The grounds surrounding the establishment are Bpacious, 
tastefully laid-out and well kept. The house itself stands one hundred 
yards back in the ground from the line of the railroad, consequently there 
is no disturbance or unpleasant noise from the sound of passing trains. 
The social atmosphere surrounding this establishment is select, and the 
guests are people of respectability and standing. The table is supplied 
with all tbe delicacies which the market affords, cooked and served in a 
perfect style. The house is furnished throughout in a comfortable man- 
ner, and everything is kept in a Btate of scrupulous cleanliness. Mrs. 
Briggs, the proprietress, is a most amiable, pleasant lady, who studies 
how to promote the comfort and happiness of her guests, and it is hardly 
necessary to say that her genial, accommodating disposition has made her 
a universal favorite. Guests at the " Rural Home," it seems superfluous 
to add, can, if they feel so disposed, enjoy surf-bathing in the rear of the 
house, or indulge in a swim in one of the numerous tank-baths in the 
neighborhood. By boat and rail the " Rural Home " is only a thirty-five 
minutes' journey from the city, and tbe cars Btop within a block of the 



July 22, 1882. 



CALIFORNIA ADVERTISER, 



15 



CRADLE. ALTAR AND TOMB. 



CRADLB. 
Aru>— 111 lhi« ottj. Julv 16, to tha wife >-f It Aul.l, ■ HO. 
Biui*«— In ihteofo, Job ( \i Bosdne, »aon. 

Ownrun In this city* Job II, toitaa wlfaof WUUain J Orovky. i 
O.urma -in ihk city. Jul> u, to ih« wife ol Q* *gi W Oampball, a daughter. 

In tin* , it>, Julj u. to the wlfaol Tbomai Cardan, a ton. 
Quumm in itn* otto, J«ii> 16, t.. Uu vtfis ol f Cfariatopha, » no, 
Bran In tali dljr, July ft, to the wlfs ■( ChariM Kt«ns, * son. 
Furum Inlhbanj.Xnt] 16, to Um wife at H. J. Kontana, * sou, 
*.;*•■". in tin-, city, Jul) T, to the wlf o af letdor QnnjLn daughter. 
HoaMBKnua— In ihb enj, July w. i*> the wife of a uoohhaiDsri i son. 

lUionr In tl.i* ,it>. Julv IS, to tho wllO Ol GeofgttW. Haight, a «>n. 
JaOUM -In thii oily, July 14, to the wife of J Jacobs, tv son. 

Knwum— Id this city, July 14, t-> th« wins oil >i. Kamnler, a aon. 

KnCflDTU— In ibis city, July 17, to the wife- of ll. Kirvhner, a s.<n. 
Lasdorkii— In thU city, July 12. to the wife of adolph W. Lnndgnbo, ■ ion, 
Lawtos — In thu city, July 17. to the wife of J. J. Lawton, a son. 
I.ivi In tin. city, July jSi 10 the Nile Of J. Levy, a daughter. 
McLai oiilix — lii tin* city, July I. lo the wife of John McLaughlin, a son, 
McKimik 1" toll city. July 10, to the wife •>( !. T. HoKenafo, a son. 
Mattmos — In thU city, July 14, to the wife of John Mattaou, a son. 
KOBJHUOUV— In tills city. July B, t<> the wife Of J. P. Nordhausen, ;i s«m. 
OaUi —lii thiacity, July 16. t«> the wife of Captain Olson, a daughter. 
Kohkb - In toll city. July 10, to the wife of Jnnies Korke, a son. 
Rasmibsb-h -In this citv. Julv 16, to the wife of George J. Rasnuissen, a sou. 
Rkillrv— In thin city, July 17, to the wife ol Kdward Reilley, a son. 
Siiasaiian— In tins city, July 14, to the wife Of Edmund Shanahan. a daughter. 
ScilSKlDKft -In thl* city, July 18, to the wife of Fred. Schneider, a son. 
Smith— In this city, July 16, to the wife of John H. Smith, a son, 
StiAMP In this city, July 17, to the wife of J. W. Sharp, a daughter. 
WlLaoM— In this city, July 18, to the wife of C. W. Wilson, a son. 

ALTAR 

Bbckkk- Reynolds —July 15, Henry J. Becker to Kiltie V. Reynolds. 
Ebni 'n-Hillmax— July IS, Charles Edgar Burton to Jennie Hillnian. 
Burd-Reillv— July 11, John Beard to Nellie Reillv. 
Bbrjison-Witu»t— July 16, Edward Berjison to Christina Witney. 
Baows-SsooK— July 18, Richard A. Brown to Eva Jane Snook. 
Birdmall-Lyncii - July 19, Samuel T. Birdsall to Margaret Lynch. 
Cowi-krthwutk-Stkwart— July 19, John J. Cowperthwaite to Jessie Stewart. 
DmaOH-Bon— By the Right Rev. Win. I Kip, D. W. Dickson to Bella T. Roe. 
Disrklspikl-Lbhkberobr— July Hi, A. Dinkelspiel to Bella Lchrberger. 
DAViKs-SorriiKRUAXD— July 11, Frank P. Davies to Mary A. b>outherland. 
Friks-Nicolaison — July 10, Marinas 0. Fries to Johanna S. F. Nicolaison. 
Flvnn-Scdrodkr— June 17. William Flynn to Sophie C Schroder. 
Glanville-Kkllkt— July 12, W. W. Glanville to Laura Kellev. 
Orarp-Hilto.v— July 18, Carl T. Graef to Adele M. Hilton. 
Hakonson-Nelmon — July 15, Olof Hakonson to Hannah G. Nelson. 
Hayward-Krkidkr— July 18, Lewis Augustus Hay ward to Maggie S. Kreider. 
HAOOETT-EsaKLHARDT— July 13, Forest F. Haggett to Louise D. Engelhardt. 
Mbtir-Hoescu— July 18. Joseph Meyer to Josephine Hoesh. 
MoRRis-BARKs-July 17, James Morris to Mary E. Barks 
McColoan-Nevin— July 9, John McCoIgan to Annie Nevin. 
MALLoY-DouoHERTT-July IS, Edward J. Malluy to Mary J. Dougherty. 
McLane-Camphai-ses— July 18, George M. McLaue to Mrs. Ina B. Camphausen. 
MiXNBu*.v-PoRTis-July 19, Edward T. Minnehan to Annie L. Portis 
Paor-Callahan— July 10, by Rev. Dr. Scott, Harry J. Page to Eliza Callahan. 
Pattbrhos--Straciian— July 1, George A. Patterson to Margaret Strachan. 
Robinbox-Grby— Juno 30, R. S. Robinson to Adeline Grey. 
Suit ii -A st re do— July 14, Benjamin Smith to Jessie Astredo. 
Stekhle-J ones— July 13, John Steeple to Mrs. Sarah S. Jones. 
ScoTCHBt'RS-O'DosxifLL -June 29, Henry J. Scotchburn to Alice A. O'Donnell. 
8wketla.\d-Howk— July 16, William P. Sweetland, M.D., to Angeline Howe. 
Scbad-McFarla.vd— W. H. Schad to A. G. McFarland. 
SMiTH-ScHWARZ-July 12, George F. Smith to Augusta W. Schwarz. 

TOMB. 

Asdornetti— July 17, John Baptiste Andometti, a native of Italy, aged 57 years. 
Cosslis— July IS. William G. Conklin, a native of Miss., aged 57 years. 
Callaqhan— July 17, Jeremiah, a native of Ireland, aged 72 years. 
Carolan— July 18, Charles A. Carolan, a native of England, aged 52 years. 
Dennibon— July 17, Lydia Dennison, a native of Maine, aged 58 years. 
Dillinoiiam— July 15, Mary E. Dillingham, a native of Ireland, aged 45 years. 
Douquerty— July 19, Sister Mary Patrick Dougherty, aged 30 years. 
Deery— July 19, Lucinda Mary Dcery, a native of Ireland, aged 33 years. 
FiTZQtBBONS— July 17, Julia Fitzgibbons, a native of Ireland, aged 32 years. 
Federspiel— July 19, Hannah E. Federspiel, a native of Sweden. 
Gross— July 14, Elkan Gross, a native of Russia, aged 45 years. 
Gordb— July 16, Emma Gords, a native of New York, aged 23 years. 
Herdiso— July 17, Conrad Herding, a native of Bavaria, aged 54 years. 
KELLY-July 17, Charles Kelly, a native of New York, aged 52 years. 
Kohlbero— July 15, Selig Kohlberg, a native of Westphalia, aged 64 years. 
Kennedy— July 14, Patrick Kennedy, a native of Ireland, aged 52 years. 
Kieckess— July 16, Henry Kieckens, a native of Germany, aged 48 years. 
Kino— Julv 19, Maria King, a native of North Slesvig, aged 44 years. 
Lavkdan— July 13, Victor Lavedan, a native of France, aged 50 years. 
Mills - July 14, Frances H. Mills, a native of New York, aged 52 years. 
Mahosey— July 16, Mary Mahoney, a native of Ireland, aged 45 years. 
McDonald— July 19, Donald McDonald, a native of Scotland, aged 63 years. 
Nelson— July 18, Sarah Elizabeth Nelson, a native of San Francisco, aged 20 years 
Pollack— July — , Mrs. Louise Pollack, a native of England, aged 47 years. 
Powers— Julv 15, Patrick Powers, a native of Ireland, aged 37 years. 
Rohl — July 18, Adolphus Ruhl, a native of Germany, aged 39 years. 
Small— July 14, Isabella Small, a native of Nova Scotia, aged 55 years. 
SmPLEY-July 19. Mrs. H. V. Shipley, a native of North Carolina. 
Trenkle— July 15, Mrs. Josefa Trenkle, a native of Baden, aged 78 years. 
Townbhnd— July 17, James B Townsend, a native of New York, aged 64 years. 
Van Blarcom— July 16, Elizabeth Van Blarcom, aged 30 years and 10 days. 
VA.ao.UEZ— July 19, Benito Vasquez, a native of Mozatlan, aged 23 years. 
Welsh— July 16, Kate Welsh, aged 34 years. 
Way— July 18, Frank T. Way, a native of San Francisco, aged 19 years. 



ANOTHER TRIAL. 
The hounding of J. C. Duncan still continues. Although the evidence 
of three former trials fully proved that there was no embezzlement of 
bank funds, and that the son, W. T. Duncan, lost $120,000 in striving to 
sustain the institution of which his father was manager, still Stratman, 
Sumner and Clark keep up the yelping. The Safe Deposit officers long 
since paid the disputed certificates, showing that they were an over-issue, 
and not forgeries, and the business community years ago decided that no 
criminal act had been committed by either Duncan, LeWarne or Kofohl ; 
still the petty persecution continues undiminished. We note with plea- 
sure the admirable ruling of Judge Ferral in the selection of jurors. 
Judge Delos Lake has volunteered, without fee, to assist David McClure 
in the defense. 



PACIFIC MAIL STEAMSHIP COMPANY. 

Tiif Coiupitiiy'K hi. -Mm. is mil miii for Yokobntnik and 
Hong koiitr: ilTV OP 1'KKlNi:, mi or ftboul Augtntl I, at 2 P.M. I 

■tonTlokau to Yokohama and return %\ ipocUl ratot. 
PorNEw TORKrta PAVAMA: GRANADA, July ttth.al a o'ekwk M-, t aking 

Freight and PaaMIlgW* tO MAZATLAN, SAN BLA8, MANZAN1LLO and AOAF1 L 
oi, and via aoapuloo for Lowar Moxlcan and Central American ports, calling ml 8 AN 
JOSE DE OU vi i. ma la and LA LI BERT AD to land PatMogan and MaiU. 
Fare to New York— Cabin. $139; Steerage. $65. 

Ticket* to and (ram Kurope by any line for aale at the lowest rates ; also fur Ha- 
vana and all Went India ports. 

Fur HONOLULU, AUCKLAND and SYDNEY: ZEALANDIA, July 29th, at 2 
P.M., or nn arrival .>( the English mails. 

810 additional \n charged for passage In Upper Cabin. Round the **' rhl Trip 
Tickets, via New Zealand and Australia, $0£>O. 

Tickets must he purchased at least one hour before time of salting. 

For freight or passage apply at the office, cor. First and Brannan streets. 

Juh 2-J. WILLIAMS, DI MUND A C O ., General Agents, 

OCCIDENTAL AND ORIENTAL STEAMSHIP CO., 

For Japau find Cblna. leave wharf, corner Flrat and Bran- 
nan BtrootM, »t 2 P.M., (or YOKOHAMA AND HONGKONG, connecting .1 
Yokohama with Steamers for Shanghai. 

BELOIC Saturday, July 22d I COPTIC Tues Sept. 6th 

ARABIC Saturday, Aug. 12th BELGIC Thumdav, Sept. 2sth 

OCEANIC Thursday, Aug. 21th | 

Excursion Tickets to Yokohama and Return at Reduced Rates. 
Cabin Plans on exhibition and Passage Tickets on sale at C. P. R. R. Co.'s General 
Offices, Room 74, corner Fourth and Townsend streets. 

For Freight, apply to GEORGE H. RICE, Freight Agent, at tho Pacific Mail Steam- 
ship Company's wharf, or at No. 202 Market street, Union Block. 

T. H. GOODMAN, General Passenger Agent. 
LELAND STANFORD. President. July 22. 

FOR PORTLAND AND ASTORIA, 0REQ0N. 

The Oregon Railway and Navigation Company and Pacific 
Coast Steamship Company will dispatch every four days, from Spear-street 
Wharf, for the above ports, one of their new Al Iron Steamships, viz.: COLUMBIA, 
OREGON and STATE OF CALIFORNIA. 

Sailing- Days 
July 1,6, 10, 14, 18,22, 26,30. | Aug 3,7, 11, 15, 19,23,27,31. 

At 10 o'clock A. M. 
Connecting at Portland, Oregon, with Steamers and Railroads and their connecting 
Stage Lines for all points in Oregon, Washington and Idaho Territories, Britten 
Columbia and Alaska. 
Ticket Office 214 Montgomery Street 



June 24. 



GOODALL, PERKINS & CO., Agents, 

No. 10 Market street, San Francisco. 



ASSESSMENT NOTICE. 

New Turk Mining 1 Compaiiy.-Location of principal place 
of business, San Francisco, California ; location of works, Gold Hill, Storey 
County, Nevada, Notice is hereby given that at a meeting of the Board of Direct- 
ors, held on the twenty-eighth day of June, 1882, an assessment (No. 28) of Ten 
Cents per share was levied upon the capital stock of the corporation, payable imme- 
diately, in United States gold coin, to the Secretary, at the office of the Company, 
Room 8, No. 327 Pine street (San Francisco Stock Exchange Building), San Fran- 
cisco, California. 

Any stock upon which this assessment shall remain unpaid on the thirty-flrstday of 
July, 1882, will be delinquent, and advertised for sale at public auction ; and un- 
less payment is made betore, will be Boldon MONDAY, the twenty-first day of August, 
1SS2, to pay the delinquent assessment, together with costs of advertising and ex- 
penses of sale. Bv order of the Board of Directors. 

F. E. DIETZ, Secretary. 

Office— Room 8, No. 327 Pine street (Stock Exchange Building), San Francisco, 
California. July 8. 

ASSESSMENT NOTICE. 

Albion Consolidated Mining: Company.— Location of prin- 
cipal place of business, San Francisco, California. Location of works, Eureka 
Mining District, Eureka, Nevada. — Notice ib hereby given, that at a meeting of the 
Board of Directors, held on the 26th day of Jane, 1882, an assessment (No. 11) 
of Twenty-five Cents per share was levied upon the capital stock of the corpora- 
tion, payable immediately in United States gold coin, to the Secretary, at the of- 
fice or the Company, Room 9, No. 327 Pine street, San Francisco, Cal. 

Any stock upon which this assessment shall remain unpaid on the THIRTY-FIRST 
(31st) day of JULY, 1882, will be delinquent, and advertised for sale at public auction, 
and, unless payment is made before, will be sold on MONDAY, the TWENTY-FIRST 
day ol AUGUST. 1882, to pay the delinquent assessment, together with cost of 
advertising and expenses of sale. Bv order of the Board of Directors. 

D. B. CHISHOLM, Secretary. 
Office— Room 9, No. 327 Pine street, San Francisco, Cal. July 15. 

ASSESSMENT NOTICE. 

CHOLLAE MINING COMPANY. 

Assessment No. 9 

Amount per Share 25 Cents 

Levied July 17th 

Delinquent in Office August 22d 

Day of Sale of Delinquent Stock Sept. 12th 

W. E. DEAN, Secretary. 
Office— Room 79, Nevada Block, No. 309 Montgomery street, San Francisco, Cal- 
fornia July 22. 

DIVIDEND NOTICE. 

Office of the Eureka Consolidated Mining- Company, Ne- 
vada Block, Room 37, San Francisco, July 15tb, 1S8 1 ?.— At a meeting of the 
Board of Directors of the above-named Company, held at their office this day, a div- 
idend (No. 75) of Twenty-five (25c.) Cents per share, was declared, payable on the 
TWENTY-SEVENTH day of July, 1882. Transfer books close with the 28th inat. 
July 22. P. JACOBUS, Secretary pro tern. 

DIVIDEND NOTICE. 

The German Saving's and Loan Society. For the half-year 
ending this date, the Board of Directors of THE GERMAN SAVINGS AND 
LOAN SOCIETY has declared a Dividend on Term Deposits at the rate of Four and 
Thirty-two One Hundredths (4 32-100) per cent, per annum, and on Ordinary De- 
posits at the rate of Three and Six Tenths (3 6-10) per cent, per annum, free from 
Federal Taxes, and payable on and after the 10th day of July, 1882. By order. 
San Francisco, June 30, 1882. (July 1.) GEO. LETTE, Secretary. 



16 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER AND 



July 22, 1882. 



REAL ESTATE TRANSACTIONS. 

Recorded in the City and County of San Francisco. California, for 
the Week ending- July 18, 1882. 

Compiled fromthe Records of the Commercial Agency ,401 California St. 1 8. F. 



Wednesday, July 12th. 



GRANTOR AND GRANTEE. 



P* ik Donohne to Genet Middlehoff 
Jdo A Mclnnla to Ely W Playter. 



S Meyerbach to Marg Reddington. 

Jos LeCount to Jules Lambla 



DESCRIPTION. 



Mrs L D Bancroft toH H Bancroft 

A A Bancroft to Same 

Emily M Palmer to Same ... 

H H Bancroft to Jos Macdonough, 
D Cahn to Paul T de Toorniel. . . . 



Patrick Foley to Marg O'Farrell . . 
Geo W FrlnktoD Legallett 



N HayeB, 162:6 e Octavfa, e 26:9x120, be- 
ing in Western Addition 149 

S O'Farrell. 39:6 w Webster, w 22:6x120, 
being in Western Addition 307; lots 2 
to 8, 17, blk 364 ; lots 10, 15, blk f" 
Great Park Homestead 

S Green, 62:6 e Musou, b76:6, e 22, s 12:6 
w 22, n 12:6 to beginning, being in 50- 
vara 231 

S Bush, 68 e Mason, e 22:6x80, and right 
of alley-way, eubj to a mortgage 

Nw Stevenson, 235 ne 4th, ne20x70 to bg 

" 195 » " 40x70 

" 195 " " 80x70 

EDupont, 87:3 n Pacfflc, n 50:3x58 ; a 
Adier, 72 e Dopont, e 22:6x40: n Paci- 
fic, 58 e Dupont, e 61:10x127:8 ; s 
Washington, 89:9 e Stockton, e 20:5 x 
61:6 

Nw Natoma, 500 sw 7th, sw 25x75, being 
in 100-vara207 

Lots 41 and 42, block 94, O'Neil & Haley 
Tract 



$7,000 



6,000 

1 

1 

15,000 

21,500 



Thursday, July 13th. 



Piin 1 Bonsset to John A It usee!) . 
W F Casbman to John Broyer.... 



M BLevy to SM Levy.. 



H Scbroeder to Kate Schroder 

W J Gnnn to Maggie J Gallagher. 



Leopold Loupe to Cath Frutinger, 
T M J Dehon to F Hornung 



Jno Cecil to Benj PG Smith 

BenJ P G Smith to Jno M Smith. 

Same to Jessie Smith 

Same to Jno Cecil 



C F B Folsom to Susannah Brunn, 

Geo Wood to Patk Sullivan 

Cyrus Walker to W C Talbot 

Mary Lyons to Jno Dielmann 



Jno Dielmann to Jno Kane 

Geo T Marye to Chas B Elliott... 



Robt M Dillard to D W C Gaskill 
JaB T Watson to Geo W Tindal . . , 



E 39tb avenue, 50 s M st, s 50x120, being 
in Outside Land block 898 

N McAllister, 252:6 e Willard, e 100, n 
102:11 Jfi, w 164:2^, e 89:11% to beg 
lots 12 to 17, Cashman Tract 

Lots 23, 24, blk 19, City Land Associa- 
tion; and all interest in50-varalotl65 

Lots 11,12, blk 307, Case Tract.... 

E 9th ave, 400 n Pi Lobos ave, n 25xl2Q, 
being in Outside Land block 189 

W Fillmore, 102:836 s Washington, s 25 
rl06:3, being in Western Addition 351 

Sw 16th and Dehon, w 30x90, being in 
Mission Block 95, Bubject to mortgage 
for$500 ■• 

Lots 14, 15, blk 8, College Hd Aaau . 

S Navy, 107 e Sanchez, e 27x114 



N Marshall, 200 w Consdon, n 110x56 ; 

lot 17, blk 8, College Hd Assn 

W Polk, 77:21* s Waebington, s 50:lX * 

103, being in WeBtern Addition 52. . . . 
Sw 18th and Sanchez, s 26:6x105, being 

in Mission Block 106. subj to a mortg. 
Ne Pacific av and Franklin, e40xl27:8l£ 

being in WeBtern Addition 93 

Sw Garden, 200 nw Bryant, nw 25x75, 

being in 100- vara 233 

Same 

Sw Pacific ave and Fillmore, s 130x12 

being in Western Addition 349 

Lcits 10. II, blk 389, lota 5, 12, 15, 16,blk 

195, S S FHd & BR Assn 

N Jackson, 162:6 e Jouea, e 50x137:6, be- 
ing in 5 0-vara836 



Friday, July 14th. 



E J Tiffany to F S Wenainger.. 
La Societe Francaise to Same.. 



C S Hinkel to Cath Halloran.... 
J HanloD to Michl McWHliams . 



Alfred Borel to P G Partridge..., 



ST Meyer to IStclnhart.. 



S T Meyer and wf to Same 

I Steinhart to L Seligman 

Micbl Cooney to P Magnire & wf. 

Jno Burr to W A der Nienberg. . . . 

Katrina ATantan to G F Tan tan. 

Same to Flora A Tantan 

Same to Mary C Silent 

Same to Emma D Blauer 

L H Newton to Wm H Peckman. . 
M B Blake et al to Same 



Nw Mission, ffJ5:8H ne Dnle, nw 22:9?i, 
e 11:11 &, b 22 to com 

Nw Mission, 698:6 ne Dale, ne 120, nw 
85:6%, s 140:9#, se 11:11*; to beg; lotB 
15 to 18, Garden Ld Hd Assn 

S Bush, 113:9 e Buchanan, e 23:9x91:6, 
being in Western Addition 233 

N 12th ave, 175 e M st, e 25x100; portion 
blk229,SS F 

Partot blocks 370, 371, 376, 377, West- 
ern Addition 

Block 682, portion 6S1, 692, Western Ad- 
dition 

Same 

Same 

Nw Bryant and Langton, w 30x80, being 
in 100-vara 254 

N 20th. 174 w Valencia, w 31x114, being 
in Mission Block 72 

S McAUiBter, 137:6 w Gough, w 25x137:6 
" 162:6 " " 

187:6 
212:6 

W Hartford, 78 s 18th, e 24:Sxl25 

Same 



1,800 

Gift 
Gift 

300 

1,625 

800 
50 
5 
5 

20 

12,000 

750 

6,000 

5 
2,400 

1 

2,250 



$ 300 

2,500 
3,250 



160 
1 

1 



',1300 
5 
5 
5 
5 
400 
100 



Saturday, July 15th. 



C H KUley to Chas Fricke 

J C Gouldln to Sherwood W Fuller 
Jno F Wood to F G Bianchi . . . 



Henry C Swain to Geo Beattie . 
Same et al to W J Gunn 



Boot Sherwood to Same 

H C Moore to Louisa T JohnBon . . 
Merch Ex Bank to H Matthews ... 
Leopold Loupe to W J Gunn 



S Union, 192:6 w Webster, w 25x137:6. 
being in WeBtern Addition 322 

S Hill, 245 w Valencia, w 82x1 14, being 
in Mission Block 74 

N Fell, 30 e Franklin, e 25x75, being in 
Western Addition 73; Bubject to mort- 
gage for |3,300 

S Sutter, 137:6 e Lyon, e 25x137:6 

N Sutter, 84:6 w Baker, w 28x87:6, being 
in Western Addition 583 

Se Clay and Lyon, e 137:6x127:8^, being 
in Western Addition 589 

W Howard, 205 8 17th, s 30x122:6, being 
in Mission Block 60 

N Ellis, 171:10 J* w Powell, w 34:4J$ x 
137:6, being in 50-vara 956 

Sw Washington and Fillmore, w 106:3 x 
27:8, being in Western Addition 351 . . 



$1,625 
2,750 

4,100 
1 

100 

5,000 

50 

14,560 

2,215 



Monday, July 17th. 



8BANT0R AND GRANTEE. 



DESCRIPTION. 



Jas W Hill to -Thos A C Dorland. 



Chas P Dnane to W S Thompson 

W S Thompson to P Fitzgerald. . 
Louis Taussig to F McAleer 



F S Ellmaker to C J Carroll.. 
A Barney to Chas 8 Barney.. 



G W Frink to F B Wilde 

Chas Rooa & wf to H Thompson. 
Mary Polack to M A Edelmann... 

Felix Cosgrove to Elizlh Perry. . . 

W H Peckham to Levi A Morgan 
Jno Willow to M Fltzpatrick .... 



Se ('hurch Lane and Alemany street, s 
2x6, e 92, n 35:10. w 91:134 to beg, be- 
ing in MiBsion Block 34... 



W cor Shipley and Willow, n 75x50, be- 
ing in 100-vara 206 

Same 

Nw Serpentine avenue, 77:10 ne Hamp- 
shire, ne 57:10, ne 107:10, w 80, a 74, w 
35, s 65 to beginning, being In Mission 
Block 177 

S 28th, 159:3K e Guerrero, e 25x100, be- 
ing in Mission Block 71 

Sw cor of Precita Valley lot 78, n 102, e 
55, a 95, w 50 to beginning 

Lots 14, 15, 16, blk 2. Johnson Tract . . . 

Lots 37, 38. blk 51, Cily Land Assn 

S Waller, 172:6 e Wehater, e 25x137:6, 
being in Western Addition 289 

Lot 47 in blk 326, Outside Land, begin- 
ning 380 s A at, and 172:9 w 43d, e 
172:9, n 60, w 157:8, s to beginning. . . . 

Com 75 b 18th st, and 125 w Hartford, s 
24:8xe25 

W Prospect av, 105 n Virginia av, n 25x 
75; lot 220, Gift Map No 3 



300 
4,900 



500 

700 

500 

6 

600 



Gift 
100 
100 



Tuesday, July 18th. 



Hoa Jah to Tong Chuck et al . 



Job Thorp to Geo H Moore et al. . 

Jno O'Leary to G Batrada 

W J Gunn to Lucy E Krauae 

Grace Pedler to Ann Olbrecht . . . 



University College to Robt Gunn. . 
Nellie P Pierce to Annie M Jewell 



Lewis Pierce by exrs to Same.. 
Same to Same , 



E Washington Place, 81 n Washington 
St, u 50, e 63, a 31, w 33, 8 19, W 30 to 
beg, being in 50-vara 89 

N Kate. 181:3 w Webster, w 25x120, be- 
ing in Western Addition 294 

Ne 19th ave, 150 ee J st, se 25x100 ; por 
lot 11, blk 364. SSF. 

W Sth ave, 200 a Clement, s 25x120, be- 
ing in Outside Land 189 

E Kearny, 135:6 nValiejo, n 36:4#, e 
88:6, a 34:42$, w 11. 8 2, w 77:6 to beg; 
se Kearny and Green, s 34:43$x61, and 
alley way 

S Haigbr. 137:6 w Octavia, e 117:6x137:6 
being in Western Addition 213 

Ne Capp and 21st, n 94:10x25, being in 
MlsBion Block 63 

Same 

Sw cor of Miasion Block 63, n 94:10 x e 



T E Lindenberger to Chas Rickoff. Nw Market, 190 aw 15th, sw 75x115, be- 
ing in Mission Block 102 



3,000 
400 
335 



10,000 

5 

1,600 

1,600 
3,570 



GEO. STREET, Agent News Letter, 30 Cornhill, E. €., London. 



F 



LIEBIG COMPANY'S EXTRACT OF MEAT. 

inestaud Cheapest Meat -flavoring- Stock for Soaps, Made 

Dishes and Sauces. _^___ 

LIEBIG COMPANY'S EXTRACT OF MEAT, 

All lu valuable and Palatable Tonic in all Cases of Weak 
Digestion and Debility. " Is a success and boon for which Natious should feel 
grateful. ' See " Medical Press," " Lancet," " British Medical Journal," etc. 



LIEBIG COMPANY'S EXTRACT OF MEAT. 

A Caution --Genuine only with fac-simile of Baron Ltebis'b 

\_y Signature, in blue ink, across Label. 

This caution is necessary owing to various cheap and inferior substitutes being in 
the market. 

LIEBIG COMPANY'S EXTRACT OF MEAT. 

To be hail of all Store-beepers, ttrocers anil Chemists. Sole 
Agents for the United States (wholesale only), C. David & Co., 9, Fenchurch 
Avenue, London, England. Sold wholesale by RICHARDS & HARRISON, San 
Francisco. Juue 10. 

he Summer Sun and Dust. Ladies and all exposed to the scorching 
rays of the sun and heated particles of dust, will find that the most 
cooling and refreshing preparation for the face, hands and amis, is 

Rowlands' Kalydor, which eradicates all prickly Heat, Sunburn, Tan, 
Freckles, Stings of Insects, etc., and produces a beautiful and delicate 
complexion. 

owlands' Macassar Oil prevents the hair falling off or becoming dry 
during the hot weather, and eradicates scurf and dandruff. 

owlands' Odouto is the purest and most fragrant Tooth Powder ever used, 
and contains no acid or mineral ingredients, which are so detrimental 
to the teeth and gums. Its purity especially adapts it for the teeth of 
young children. Ask any dealer in perfumery for Rowlands' articles, 
of 20, Hatton Garden, London. 

COOS BAY COAL. 

The Cleanest and Cheapest. 

No Soot! No Dirt! 

The Best Coal for Domestic Use ! 



T 



R 
R 



[May 27.] 



All Coal Dealers Keep It! 



BRITISH BENEVOLENT SOCIETY OF CAL. 

Attendance, daily, from lO a.m. to 1 p.m., by the under- 
signed, to receive subscriptions and donations, ana to furnish all information 
relating to the Society. 
Oct. 23. 



J. P. McCURRIE, Secretary, 

Room 4, No. 531 California st. 



L. LANSZWEERT, 

ANALYTICAL AND CONSULTING CHEMIST, 

360 FOVRTM SXKBETj SAJf TRA2TCISCO. 

[July 15.] 



July 22, 1882. 



CALIFORNIA ADVEKTISKH. 



17 



NOTABILIA. 



THE PEDDLERS SONG. 



Lawii u white u driven snow ; 
Cvprraa black &* e'er a-m CTDW ; 
illOTM U iWni ft» dftlliaitk rOMM ', 

Mjuka (or (iu-vm and («>r immm ; 
Pnsjls bficskt. iicckUu**. juhKt ; 
MttM I'T * Udj'o ShSJJBbw , 



OoMquoipi fend aUmiachcrt, 
For my lads to fin their dear*; 

Pin* ami wtllnf rthilii nl vital. 

What iii.D.!-. lu.k Erom ht»d to heel : 

Oamsbui .i me,eoaie;oaaM faoay.eaaieban 

BnXi Wit " r **>* >" 1,r i^***'* cry. 

William BnAXBrUlB. 



A dispatch hen Corona, Spain, mji ths Duka of Edinburgh, while 
Huh ing raosntl" near Bayou a, wa« dragged lnto_ water sixteen feet deep) 
and carried aoder f->tir times, by s Urge flifa which took his hook. For a 
Duke that is a pretty good fish story, ant! if Ananias was still living hits 
taonli woold !>*• jeopardised. We umire Edinburgh 'a pluck in hanging 
on to the |M>lf until he was carried under the water four times. Hut if 
we had been In his place, after the fir*t pull under we would have let go 
and then gone home, put on dry clothes, and invited our beet girl to ac- 
company oa to the Origin*) Swain's Bakery, 213 Sutter street, to have 
tome of the delicious mlnoe pies, ice-cream* and confections that can be 
obtained then. 

It Is stated by a Princeton man that the reaaon his college is not win- 
ning as many athletic prizes as formerly, is that the students have 
adopted white Banoel suits, single-barreled eye-glasses and ice-cream.— 
Puck. 

"Now, my son," said a West Side cabinet-maker to his little boy, 
"you must rememlter that sins are like nails driven into a post. Repent- 
ence is merely pidlini; the nails out, but the scars— the boles remain." 
" But, I say, ' interrupted the youth, *' can't we kinder putty 'em up, as 
you do the worm holes in the rotten basswood that you use to m;ike real 
'English oak bedroom sets ?" The West Side cabinet-maker softly scratched 
the wart on his nose for a few minutes, and then he remarked that every 
one who wanted to enjoy well-cooked meals should buy an Arlington 
Range from I>e La Montanya, Jackson street, below Battery. The Ar- 
lington Range is admittedly the most complete cooking apparatus in the 
world, 

" I have heard every sermon preached in this church for the last fifty 
years," said a man of quiet satire ; " and," he added slily, '* I'm a Chris- 
tian still." — : W, O. Picayune. 

An exchange speaks of " a striking window ornament." And queerly 
enough it doesn't refer to a pot of plants which sometimes falls from the 
second-story window ledge and strikes a man on the head, demolishing 
his hat, emptying a pint of earth down his neck, and converting him, for 
about ten minutes, into the profanest kind of a pirate that ever went to 
J. R. Kelly & Co. 'a, Market street, below Beale, to buy the Imperishable 
Paint, which comes already mixed, covers three times the space that or- 
dinary paint does, and is impervious to sun or rain. 

"I'm saddest when I sing," warbled a young lady at an evening 
party, and the other guests said: " So are we! So are we! " 

A Democratic organ says; " The true Democrat will die in the last 
ditch before he will surrender to the enemies both of the people and their 
liberties." Yes ; that sounds very nice, but it is plagiarized from that 
true Democrat, Jeff Davis. He, too, was in favor of dying in the last 
ditch rather than surrendering to the enemy — but he didn't die. He still 
lives, and he says that every one who sends $2.50 and a photograph to the 
Newh Letter Medallion Company, will receive in return 100 photo- 
graph medallions, already gummed and perforated, and just the size of 
a postage-stamp. 

Let the man of the house lose his head and see how quickly the wife 
of his bosom will find her tongue. — Boston Star. 

" Gentlemen of the jury," said an Irish bairister, " it will be for you 
to say whether this defendant shall be allowed to come into court with 
unblushing footsteps, with the cloak of hypocrisy in his mouth, and draw 
three bullocks ont of my client's pocket with impunity." The gentlemen 
of the jury took the matter under consideration, and the Judge said that 
everybody who wanted pure and unadulterated liquors should go to P. J. 
Cassin & Co.'s, corner of Washington and Battery streets. Families sup- 
plied in retail quantities at wholesale rates. 

A young married man, whose house-rent is paid by bis mother-in- 
law, calls her " darling pay-rent." 

A little girl who ran home from school, all out of breath, said: " Oh, 
please, ma, may I get married and have a husband ?" "My child," ex- 
claimed the astonished mother, " don't let me hear such words from you 
again! " " Well, then, may I have a piece of bread and butter and go to 
Bradley & Rnlofson's celebrated photographic studio, corner of Mont- 
gomery and Sacramento streets, and have my picture taken. They say 
that B. & R.'s pictures are always accurate and well-finished." 

There is a tied in the affairs of murderers which, taken at the scaffold, 
leads on to suffocation. — JV. Y. News. 

"Papa, am I a little sinner?" " Yes, my son, we are all sinners." 
" And, papa, the Bible says the devil is the father of sinners, doesn't it ?" 
"Yes, dear, I believe it does." "Then, papa, are you the devil?" His 
offspring's logic was too much for him, and he slipped out of the room 
without answering. But he is a very sensible man, nevertheless. When 
he wants to get a stylish, well-made hat, he goes to White, 614 Commer- 
cial street. 

A good sailor takes his sail on a schooner at sea, and a bad sailor 
takes his ale in a "schooner " on shore, and all epicures drink Napa Soda. 

"Many silly people despise the precious, not understanding it." But 
no one debpises Kidney- Wort after giving it a trial. Those that have used 
it agree that it is by far the best medicine known. Its action is prompt, 
thorough and lasting. Don't take pills, and other mercurials that poison 
the system, but by using Kidney- Wort restore the natural action of all 
the organs. 



When some one's step cuuim up the walk. 

Your oheeln take on a rosier hoe ; 
And though DO other hear* his knock, 

Von hear it wall yon know you dol 
And when his arm steals round your chair, 

Vow give ;i nootherod scream or two, 
As if you didn't want it there; 

But, oh! you do— yon know you do! 
You let him kiss your blushing cheek; 

Somehow your lips meet his lips, too ; 
You tempt him, pretty thing to speak, 

You wicked flirt— you know you do! 
And when he timidly doth press 

His wish to make a wife of you, 
With happy heart you answer yes, 

You darling girl— you know you do! 

She had ordered nothing but vegetablea, and was eating them vigor- 
ously, when a little old lady seated next to her — one of those busy-bodies 
ever anxious to he pleasant — smiled and interrogatively said: " Vegeta- 
rian ?" " Xo," said the other in quick response, *' Unitarian ; I'm from 
Boston — are you ?" One of those grand old Beethoven laughs went round 
the table, and the bald-headed philosopher remarked that Noble Bros., 
642 Clay street, San Francisco, are the boss house and sign painters. 

The old man of the sea was an ocean buoy once. — N. 0. Picayune. 

Thousands of ladies cherish grateful remembrances of the help de- 
rived from the use of Lydia E. Pinkham's Vegetable Compound. 

J. F. Cutter's Old Bourbon.— This celebrated whisky is for Bale by 
all first-class druggists and grocers. Trade mark — star within a shield. 

Best pictures taken at the Imperial Gallery, 724J Market street. 

JOHN WIGMORE, 

HARDWOOD LUMBER, 

SHIP TIMBER, LOCUST TREENAILS, 
Veneers and Fancy 'Woods, 

129 to 147 Spear St. and 26 and 28 Howard St.. San Francisco. 
[April 8. J 

THOMAS PRICE'S 

ASSAY OFFICE AND CHEMICAL LABORATORY, 

524 Sacramento Street San Francisco. 

Deposit!* or Bullion received, melted luto bars, aud returns 
made in from twenty-four to forty-eight hours. 
Bullion can be forwarded to this office from any part of the interior by expresB, 
and returns made iu the same manner. 
Careful Analysis made of Ores, Metal, Soils, Waters, Industrial Products, etc. 
Mines examined and reported upon. Consultations on Chemical and Metallurgical 
questions. March 20. 

LEE CRAIG, 

SEARCHER OF RECORDS. 

Notary Public and Commissioner of Deeds. 

316 Montgomery Street Bet. California and Fine. 

Commissioner for New York, Arizona, Nevada, Pennsylvania, Utah, Oregon, Idaho 
Washington Territory, Ohio, Massachusetts, New Hampshire, Illinois, New Jersey, 
and other States and Territories. DEPOSITIONS A SPECIALTY. Acknowledg- 
ments taken and oaths administered at any hour of the day or night. 

May 13. LEE D. CRAIG. 

SANTA CRUZ FURNISHED HOUSES, 

From 825 Per Month, in the Best Locations. 
EXCHANGE AND MART Santa Cruz, Cal. 

No. 2 of the new Land Journal, of Santa Cruz county, containing full details of 
Real Estate for sale, soil, climate, productions, etc., FREE BY MAIL. May 27. 

WILLIAM A. SCOTT, JR. 

Money wanted on improved city property In Tucson, A.T., 
and on paying property in the vicinity, in sums to suit the lender, at from 1 
to 1£ per cent. Mining property handled. Address, 

WILLIAM A. SCOTT, JR., 
Stock, Commission, Insurance Broker and General Agent, 
April 22. 7 Camp street, Tucson, Arizona Territory. 



PROF. JOS. JOSSET, 



Graduate of the University of Paris; Ex. Professor of De 
la Mennais' Normal, France; late of Point Loma Seminary, San Diego. Pri- 
vate Lessons in the French Language. Residence: 1114 Stockton street, between 
Pacific and Jackson. At home from 12 to 2 p.m. Private Lessons given at the res- 
idence of the pupil. Dec. 6. 

AUGUSTUS LAYER, . 

Architect, 

Furnishes Plans, Specifications and Superintendence for 
the Construction or Renovation of Dwelling Houses, and every deacribtion of 
Building. Office: 19 S. F. STOCK EXCHANGE, Pine street, S. F. 

£3" Take the Elevator. Dec. 10. 

NOTICE. 

lor the very best photographs g-o to Bradley A Rnlofson's, 

in an Elevator, 429 Montgomery street. Oct. 29 



F 

$5 to $20 



per day at me. Samples worth Sfi free. 

Address StinsonA Co., Portland, Maine 



Iohi Ban enlarged ; largest iu the world. 



18 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER AND 



July 22, 1882. 



BIZ.' 



The Produce Exchange have presented their semi-annual statement 
of the stock of Grain in the State at the end of the cereal year, June 
30th. From the exhibit before us we find that the stock of Wheat, July 
1st, was 2,822,903 ctls.; ditto July 1, 1881, 12,444,278 ctls.; ditto in July 
1, 1880, 323,821 ctls.; ditto in July 1, 1879, 593,251 ctls.; ditto in July 1, 
1878, 284,424 ctls. The present Spot price of Wheat is SI 70@S1 75 ^ 
ctl. New Wheat arrives sparingly, although the ship G. C. Trufant is 
Baid to be loaded with new Wheat, and will soon sail for Cork. 

The Barley market is poorly stocked with the old crops, Brewing being 
held at 2c, and hard to obtain. The stock of old crop (all grades) on 
hand July 1, 162,416 ctls., against 595,028 ctls. at a correspond iner date of 
last year. New crop Feed is arriving freely, selling at SI 30@S1 35 $ 
ctl. New Brewing is held at SI 40@S1 45 # ctl. 

Oats are in light supply. The stock on hand July 1st, 21,305 ctls.; 
same time last year, 15,744 ctls.; Spot price, SI 80 ^ ctl. 

Corn. — The stock in the State, July 1st, 61,507 ctls.; one year ago, 
July 1st, 95,250 ctls.; Spot price, SI 75. 

Grain Bags have undergone a material advance during the week, 
caused by an increased demand from the interior as the crops upon harv- 
esting are turning out better than was expected. Considerable sales of 
Calcutta Standard have been made the past few days at 9£@9§c, closing 
at 9fc. All other kinds rule from 9£@9ic, the market closing firm at the 
advance. 

WooL — We remark an increased demand during the week, with sales 
of some 7,500 bales Fleece upon private terms, yet within the range of 
25@27c. for good to choice and 18@20c. for off parcels. 

Quicksilver. — We note free shipments to Mexico by the outgoing 
Bteamer. Stock is, however, light. Holders generally ask 37^c, but sales 
from the wharf are made at 37c. 

Syrup. — The local refiners have reduced the price 10c. per gaL for all 
grades— now, bbls., 62^c. ; in hf. bbls., 65c. ; 5 gal. kegs, 70c; 1 gal tins, 80c 
This decline is doubtless owing to the lar?e quantity of Eastern that is 
arriving here, and as more or less of it is adulterated with Sorghum, sells 
at a reduced price. 

Sugar. — We had several arrivals from the Sandwich Islands during the 
week — the Klikitat from Honolulu, with 15,878 pkgs., and the Cyane 
from Kalului, with 6,720 bags. We quote White Refined at 12£c, Yel- 
low and Golden at 10i@llc 

From the Orient we have the British steamship Malabar, to W. T. 
Coleman & Co., with 795 Chinese. This makes some 25,000 coolies that 
have arrived at this port since the 1st of January. ThiB steamer brought 
for cargo: Rice, 11,695 mats; Coffee, 417 bags; Pepper, 265 bags; Oil, 
602 cases, and of Chow Chow, 2,239 cases. 

The ship Grisedale, from Liverpool, has arrived with a valuable cargo 
of Chemicals, Iron, etc. 

Prom Hamburg we have the German bark Alster, 200 days, with a 
well assorted cargo of German goodB, also a large quantity of Iron in 
bars, buudles and wire. 

Cottons for China. — The steamship Granada brought up from the 
Isthmus, en route from New York to China, 3,900 bales Cotton Sheetings. 
This trade is growing rapidly in importance. 

For the Orient. — The 0. and 0. steamship Gaelic sailed for Hong" 
kong on Saturday last, with a valuable cargo, consisting in part of Flour* 
7,328 bbls.; Ginseng, 7,229 tbs.; Quicksilver, 400 flasks, and other goods > 
value, $83,437; also, in treasure to Hongkong, $47,109. To Japan she 
carried 455 bbls. Flour, and other merchandise ; value, S10.88S ; and in 
treasure, $105,644. The steamship Belgic, of the same line, having been 
released from quarantine, will sail this day for China and Japan, carry- 
ing a cargo somewhat similar to the foregoing. 

Coal and Iron. — We have nothing of encouragement to report con- 
cerning these two staple articles of import. The low prices of the former 
ruling for Australian have enabled the Gas Company to make liberal con- 
tract purchases, to arrive at very low prices ; and as for Pig Iron, the 
large expected output of Pacific Slope foundries during the year keeps 
out buyers from the market. 

Salmon. — Oregon is sending us free supplies of Columbia River fish, 
the steamship Columbia bringing 3,177 cs. and the City of Chester 4,700 
cases. The reports concerning the Salmon catch in Oregon are conflicting, 
while the latest advices from Fraser River, B. C, lead us to expect an 
increased pack in that region. The Commercial Reporter, dated Portland, 
Oregon, July 14th, has this item concerning the Salmon pack for 1882 : 
Many fears have been expressed thatf the Salmon pack of this season 
would fall far short of that of last year. A gentleman who is thoroughly 
posted in regard to the matter furnishes the following information : Salmon 
pack up to July 1, 1882, 292,912 cases. Salmon pack up to July 1, 1881, 
325,000 cases. Shortage to the 1st of July, 32,088 cases. It is thought by 
the most competent judges that this shortage will be overcome by the 
splendid run of fish now pouring in. Fish are large and the average take 
is good — we may, therefore, unless something unforeseen occurs, look for 
a pack of over 500,000 cases, or, say, one equal to last season, 545,000 cases. 
On the 1st of June there was a shortage of 57,000 cases as against last sea- 
son's pack of that date; there has, however, been a steady increase, and, 
although up-river canneries have fallen back, Astoria, with the old can- 
neries and increased facilities, and new ones added, has pulled the score 
up rapidly under the fine July run. It is said that fash will be taken after 
July 31st, as the law is considered unsound. If this is so, the pack may 
reach larger proportions than ever before known. 

Tonnage and Freights.— At this writing the disengaged fleet in port 
and in ports adjacent aggregate about 35,000 registered tons ; on the berth, 
36.000 tons. The fleet to arrive in all this year, 293,000 tons ; same time 
1881, 360,000 tons ; same time 1880, 150,000 tons. The present quotable 
rates for Wheat charters to Europe are 50@55s., to a direct port. The 
ship Oneida has been laid on for New York in the Dispatch Line. 

The Produce Exchange election resulted as follows: Directors- 
President, Charles Clayton; Vice-President, William Babcock; Treasurer, 
W. A. Bray; H. Waterman, William Dresbach, John Wightman, Jr., 
Jackson Hart, H. V. Deming, E. D. Kalisher. Committee of Appeals — 



E. Ransom, R. P. Tenney, Frank Dalton, H. A. Mayhew, Thomas New- 
ell. Mr. Tenney received 121 votes, or every vote cast 

Fruit. — The market is surfeited with Apricots, Apples, Berries, Figs, 
Cherries, Pears, Peaches, Plums, etc. Our canners are having a fine sea- 
son of it, buying the very choicest fruits at low prices. 

Coffee. — Thus far during July 758 bags good Guatemala were sold for 
shipment to St. Louis, and for local consumption the sales were: 200 bags 
good to choice Costa Rica, ll@12c per pound ; 2,250 bags fair to good 
Costa Rica, mixed with black beans, S£@10c; 200 bags inferior Costa 
Rica, 6@8c; 1,500 bags good unwashed Salvador, 10@10£c. ; 55 bags Gua- 
temala, peaberry, 13Jc; 104 bagB choice Guatemala, 12c; 350 bags good 
Guatemala, 10@llc; 550 bags middling Guatemala, 8A@9c; 550 bags in- 
ferior to ordinary Guatemala, 6@8c The imports during the first half 
of the present year were much larger than those of the corresponding 
period of 1881. To thiB fact partly, but mainly to the unfavorable posi- 
tion of this article in the other markets of the world, is due the steady 
decline of prices since the beginning of the year. The total of sales du- 
ring the six months ending July 1st is about 10,000 bags less than last 
year. This is to be ascribed to the large speculative purchases made by 
dealers in June of last year, owing to the then favorable statistical posi- 
tion of the article, whereas this year, on the contrary, they have been de- 
terred from carrying large stocks by the steadily declining prices and the 
uncertainty of the future. There is no reason to suppose that thiB year's 
consumption will be smaller than that of last. The overland shipments 
have been also less than in 1881, owing partly to the scarcity of the best 
grades of Guatemala Coffee, but mainly to the low prices ruling in the 
Atlantic ports. Good unwashed Salvador Coffee has sold readily at 1@ 
l±c per pound below the price of good Guatemala. Costa Rica, mixed 
with black beans, has been very much neglected, and prices have ranged 
lower than in former years, compared with other qualities. Triage Cof- 
fees sold at good prices early in the Beason, owing to their then scarcity, 
but are now much lower. The market closes very weak, and there is 
very little disposition on the part of dealers to do any business even at 
the reduced prices to which importers heve lately submitted. Quotations 
are: ll£@12c for choice Costa Rica ; 9@10c for fair Costa Rica, mixed 
with black beans ; lli@12c. for superior Guatemala, very scarce ; 10c. 
for good unwashed Salvador; 10£@llc. for good Costa Rica; 6@8£c for 
inferior Costa Rica ; 10@llc for fair to good Guatemala. 

Sugar.— Imports for six months, 1882, 66,864,803 lbs.; same time 1881, 
68,412,241 lbs.; same time 1880, 55,359,769 lbs.; same time 1879, 32,137,636 
tbs. From New York the imports of Refined Sugar have amounted to 
about 1,086,515 tbs. in the first six months of this year, against 3.500,000, 
2,586,645 and 2,007,600 lb3. during the same period of the years 1881, 1880 
and 1879, respectively. The large increase of production in the Hawaiian 
Islands has stopped almost entirely the importation into this market of 
Raw Sugars from other countries. A limited quantity of duty-paying 
Raws are, however, still required both for shipment in bond, in their 
natural state, and to enable refiners to fill the increasing demand for ex- 
port to foreign countries of their refined product. The Muscovadoes re- 
ceived from Central America, suitable for refining, have been sold readily 
to refiners at priceB corresponding to the cost of their own importations. 
The present stock of Raw Sugars is very large, but is held almost entirely 
by refiners. The prices of Refined fluctuated in the last six months be- 
tween ll£c. and 12|c ^ lb. for Crushed, and 9gc and ll$e. for best Yel- 
low, refiners being guided by the cost of Eastern Sugars laid down in this 
market. Concessions are made by them on sales for shipments to foreign 
countries and to the Central States. 



SOCTETY OF CALIFORNIA PIONEERS. 
This eminently respectable corporation was organized August, 
1850, and designed to be a moral, beneficial, literary and scientific associ- 
ation, formed to cultivate social intercourse and more perfect union be- 
tween its members, and to create a fund for charitable purposes in their 
behalf ; to form cabinets, libraries, etc. ; to collect and preserve informa- 
tion connected with the early settlement and conquest of this common- 
wealth, and to perpetuate the memory of those whose sagacity, energy 
and enterprise induced them to settle in the wilderness and become found- 
ers of a new State. Admission to the society is limited to gentlemen 
who arrived here prior to January 1, 1850, and their male descendants. 
The whole number of members to-day is 1,091, divided as follows: Honor- 
ary 25, Life 545, Contributing 517. Deceased members number 613. The 
financial status of the society is highly satisfactory. The money in bank, 
together with the hall on Montgomery street, libraries, cabinets, and 
property on Fourth street, have a value of $250,000. In addition, the so- 
ciety will receive some $250,000 or $300,000 from the Lick estate. The 
annual election of this society took place on the 7th inst., when the fol- 
lowing officers were elected : President, Washington Bartlett ; Vice- 
Presidents— Geo. W. Gibbs, D. A C. Duisenberg, Wm. McPherson Hill, 
Niles Searles ; Treasurer, Howard Havens ; Secretary, Ferdinand Vas- 
sant; Marshal, Isaac Bluxome; Directors — Charles Clayton, R. P. John- 
son, Justin Gates, Theo. F. Payne, Henry Schmieden, John Kelly, Jr., 
George T. Marye, Jr., John P. Bourne. Two tickets were in the field, 
the Regular and Members', and great interest was felt in the result. The 
greatest harmony and good feeling was exhibited by all who participated 
in the contest. The whole Members* ticket was elected by a handsome 
majority, having been ably worked by Messrs. James Phelan, Wm. F. 
Swasey, Wm. H. V. Cronise, Benj. D. Coit, Franklin Lawton, John F. 
Lohse, Charles R. Story, Milo Hoadly, J. G. Eastland and many others. 
The result was announced at 9 P. m., and cordially indorsed by all mem- 
bers, with the exception of Wm. Huefner. candidate for Marshal on the 
Regular ticket. This gentleman has held the office named for the past 
thirteen years, and evidently was much disgusted at the loss of his official 

SoBition and perquisites. At 9:30 P. M., at the invitation of Washington 
■artlett, Esq., President elect, those present (some seventy-five in num- 
ber) adjourned to the elegant saloons of Francisco Garcia, in the block 
adjoining the Hall, and indulged in a moBt delightful reunion. " It was, 
indeed, good to be there." Good wines, cigars and elegant language 
flowed without limit. Addresses were made by Messrs. Bartlett, Hol- 
land, Eastland, Bradford, Tiffany, Perkins, and several others. 

The Sheltered Cove Baths and bathers are to be photographed Sun- 
day morning. No extra charge from price of baths to have your picture 
taken. 



July 22, 1882. 



TALIKORNLA ADVERTISFK. 



19 



CREDIT WHERE CREDIT IS DUE. 
The firm o( NewtOD Brothers, maaafactoran of the New England 
Raking Powder, (faeerr* t" take rank iu* pnbUo-aphited benefactor^. In 
the face of the fact that the market la crowded with vile oompouodfl man- 
ufacture'! out of ammonia, polverised marble, alum, staivh, floor, etc., 
etc., ami which are •old uiulcr the ■aduotiva title of bating powder, these 
^t'Dtleineo have continued t<> nmuufacture a pure, wholoaome, unadulter- 
ated cream of tartar and bioarbonata of eode jwiwder. This horn 
poruoM end renrd for the stomachs of the consuming pnbllo has, of 

planed these deeerring manufacturers at a disadvantage in i 
tition with the unscrupulous manufacturers against whom they are obliged 
to contend. Cream of tartar is an expensrra Ingredient, end a baking 
powder manufactured from it and bioarbonata of soda will only carry the 
margin of profit, On the other band, carbonate of ammonia, rice- 
flour, marble dnati alum, starch, etc., etc., are articles which can be pur- 
chased for about 5 cents a pound, and, therefore a baking powder which 
i- made from theni and sold at from 50 to liO cents an ounce carries a 
startling margin of profit. The inequality of the contest is apparent. 
There was nothing feo prevent tfoesie. Newton Brothers from adopting 
the tactics of the unscrupulous manufacturers of other bran its of powder, 
and adulterating theirs with vile, filthy and. for leavening purposes, use- 
less ingredients that can be bought for a mere song. They have preferred, 
however, to be honest men, and to place upon the market a pure, whole- 
some article, which will not destroy health. They have gone even fur- 
ther than that. In the interests of the public they have gone to the 
trouble and expense of getting Professor Summers, of the University of 
California, and also the celebrated Dr. John J. Bleasdale, to obtain pack- 
ages of the various brands of powder offered for sale on this market, and 
to subject them to a careful analysis. These distinguished chemists have 
respectively reported that every powder they could find <>n the market, 
with the exception of the New England, was adulterated to a greater or 
lesser extent, and many of them were ascertained to contain alum and 
other poisonous ingredients to such au extent as to render them positively 
unsafe fur use in human food. And the strangest thing of all was the 
fact that a powder which has for years been advertised as a pure cream of 
tartar and bicarbonate of soda baking powder, the manufacturers of 
which have been attacking and maligning all other brands of powder 
— probably under the impression that by Bhouting "stop thief their own 
larceny would not be suspected — was found to contain extensive quanti- 
ties of carbonate of ammonia, tartaric acid and starch. These analyses 
have been published, and, consequently, owing to the public spirit of 
Messrs. Newton Brothers, every housekeeper can tell what brands of 
baking powder are chemically pure, and, owing to the honesty of the 
same gentlemen, there is one brand, the New England, which is pure. 

MISCELLANEOUS ITEMS. 

It has been found, and satisfactorily established, that intellect and 
brain power are uot dependent upon the size of the head, but rather upon 
the texture and quality of the brain. The London Lancet gives the head 
measurement, as inferred from the size of the hats worn, of Beveral promi- 
nent men, as follows: Lord Chelmsford, 6£, full ; Dean Stanley, 6£, full ; 
Lord Beaconsfield, 7 ; the Prince of Wales, 7, full ; Charles Dickens, 7J ; 
Lord Selbome, 7£; John Bright, 7k Earl Russell, 7&; Lord Macauley, 7jJ; 
Mr. Gladstone, 7,; Archbishop of York, 8. The late Dr. Pritcbard finally 
disposed of the notion that cranial measurements could be accepted as 
brain measurements. Since his day the student of cerebral development 
has ceased to rely on what used to be called ''phrenology." Hereafter, 
probably, light may be thrown on the subject of special or regional devel- 
opment, both in regard to their personal growth and transmission by 
heredity, but at present neither the hat nor the head furnishes trustworthy 
indications of mental power and capacity, and that the only feature of in- 
terest as yet noticed is the curious fact of unequal development and con- 
sequent want of sympathy. 

A Remarkable Flower.— The unusally fine plant of the night-flow- 
ering Cereus, Cactus Grandiflorus of Linnaeus, which has for some years 
been one of the floral wonders of North Wales, is now in splendid perfec- 
tion in the conservatory attached to the mansion called Pendyffryn, at 
Penmjenmawr. One end of the conservatory is entirely covered with the 
thick succulent leafless stems of the plant, and upon these stems are borne 
in rich profusion the magnificent blossoms, each of which is from four to 
six inches in diameter, and of a rich golden color, the effect of the whole 
being beautiful beyond description. The porprietor of Pendyffryn, Mr. 
W. Smith, will be glad for all interested in plant life or flowers to see the 
plant. The name "Night-flowering Cereus" is given from its singular 
habit of expanding its blossoms in the evening, remaining open all night, 
and closing early next day. By this means it attracts the night-flying 
moths, which aid its fertilization. 

Prince Bismarck entertained the Ambassadors of the various Powers 
the other day at a farewell dinner prior to leaving Berlin for the season. 
In the course of the conversation one of the guests is reported to have 
expressed his surprise at the Chancellor in a recent speech in the Imperial 
Parliament having spoken of Mr. Gladstone as a " colleague." "Nay, 
but we are really colleagues," replied the Prince ; *' I grow timber and he 
fells it." The reply h interpreted as hinting at a contrast between con- 
structive and destructive statesmanship, a point on which the reader may 
be left to judge for himself. 

A Bushel of Misfortunes.— A farmer at Plouguenal, near St. Briens, 
France, threw what he supposed to be a lump of soft clay at his son. 
A stone imbedded in the soft mass struck the boy on the temple and 
killed him instantaneously. The father, wild with grief, went and 
hanged himself on the nearest tree. The mother ran oat to the scene, 
leaving an infant she was nursing on a heap of manure. When she re- 
turned the child was torn to pieces by pigs. The mother has since gone 
mad.— Sydney Bulletin. 

The Chronicle's " Footlight Flasher " says: " California has sent New 
York actors, stars, minstrels, plays and musicians. The next thing Cali- 
fornia will have to do will be to send it a good, healthy dramatic critic 
for its daily press." If that's so, my dear boy, you never had a surer 
thing — to stay here. 

We hear that a Berkshire, England, cfergyman has substituted Zoe- 
done for the Sacramental wine. 



The Hungarian Prime Minister baa won the nympathies of all right 
thinking man by the sympathy which he buexpreaeed for the Kutt-iian 
Jawa. A faw days sine*, the Hungarian Parliament h id bo witness some 
tnrbnlent soenea provoked by the debate no a petition igainst the lmml< 
. of the Etonian Jews, Borne deputise took the welcome oppor- 
of expressing their anti Semitic sentiments, and the deputy Onody 
want so Car m to "prove," by quotation! from various hooka and news- 
paper*, that the Jawa require the blond of Christians for their ritual ser- 
For this ha was called to order by the President* who remarksd 
that this apeech was a disgrace to the House, and towered the country in 
the eyes of Burope. The Prime Minister, Tibia, declared that be cannot 
and will not convent the refugees from entering Hungary, and that he 
will do what lu; can to obtain public funda for their relief, if private 
benevolence shonld prove insufficient The acclamations with which Mr. 
da Tissa'a speech was received showed that the anti-Semitic agitators in 
the Hungarian l>iet will not succeed in involving the Hbnae in proceed- 
ings opposed to common decency and humanity. 

Messrs. Goodwin 8c Co., the well-known New York tobacconists 
who manufacture the celebrated Old Judge cigarettes, are meeting with a 
degree of success which is marvelous. The Old Judge baa from the first 
been a favorite with all smokers. Here in California the white paper in 
which this favorite cigarette is rolled, in consequence of atmospheric ac- 
tion, was in the habit of becoming spotted. This did Dot injure the ci- 
garette, but it damaged its appearance. Messrs. Goodwin & Go. set them- 
selves to overcome this difficulty, and they are now rolling in special pa- 
per the Old Judge cigarettes for this coast. Messrs. Goodwin & Co. have 
also, in order to meet and accommodate a varied public taste, designed a 
new cigarette expressly for the Pacific Coast. This new cigarette is called 
the Chancellor. It is milder than the Old Judge, and possesses an ex- 
quisite flavor. With ladies who indulge in a quiet whiff, this cigarette 
will undoubtedly become a great favorite, as it will with gentlemen of re- 
fined esthetic tastes. 

It affords us great pleasure to call attention to the Solar Printing es- 
tablishment of Messrs. Craig & Mosher. These gentlemen can enlarge 
photographs from the smallest size up to life-size, and a life-size photo- 
graph, after being touched up by an artist, makes a finer picture than 
the average run of paintings, and is produced at a comparatively speaking 
insignificant cost. Messrs. Craig & Mosher is the only firm in this city 
engaged in the Solar Printing business, and its work gives universal sat- 
isfaction. Unless business increases beyond its capacity for performance, 
it is not likely to have opposition. 

The mastodon picnic of the season will be given by the Bamfians 
at Shuetzen Park, Alameda, on Sunday, July 30th. Elaborate prepara- 
tions have been made to promote the comfort and enjoyment of those who 
attend this social reunion, and a glorious time is anticipated. A first-class 
band will furnish music, and the dancing floor will be under the charge of 
thoroughly qualified managers. In addition to the regular sports there 
will be many special features. 

Messrs. J. M. Litchfield 8c Co., merchant tailors, 415 Montgomery 
street, have been established in this community for several decades, and 
they have established their reputation as first-class tailors beyond dis- 
putation. Their stock of goods embraces every pattern and material 
known, and their workmen and cutters cannot be surpassed in point of 
ability. We advise those of our readers who require new garments to 
give this firm a trial. 

If you want to be healthy, jump up in the morning and go to the 
Neptune and Mermaid Swimming Baths, foot of Hyde and Larkin 
streets, and take a plunge in the sea. These baths are handy to reach 
and are kept in a delightful state of cleanliness. 

Krug Champagne, from Reims, Prance.— Private Cuvee in quarts 
and pints. Shield— Krug — in qaarts and pints ; Premiere Qualite, in 

3uarts and pints. For sale by Hellmann Bros. & Co., comer Front and 
ackson streets. 

St. John's Presbyterian Church, Post Street— The Rev. Dr. 

Scott, pastor, will preach Sunday at the usual hours. The public cor- 
dially invited to attend. 

OCEANIC STEAMSHIP COMPANY. 

For Honolulu, H. I.«The Steamship •Suez." Dodd, Mas- 
ter, will leave for above port WEDNESDAY, August 9th, at 12 o'clock m. , from 
Main-street Wbarf. Freight will be taken at *4 per too. Freight will be received on 
Wednesday, July 5th. 
For freight or passage apply to J. D. SPRECKELS & BROS., Agents, 

July 22. 327 Market, corner Fremont. 

DIVIDEND NOTICE. 

The California Saving.* aud Loan Society, northwest cor- 
ner Powell and Eddy streets. The Board of Directors have declared a divi- 
dend to Depositors at the rate of four and thirty-two on >hundredths (4 32-100) per 
cent, per annum on Term Deposits, and three and sixty one-hundredths (3 60-100) 
per cent per annum on Ordinary Deposits, free from Federal Tax, for the half-year 
ending June 30, 1SS2, payable on and after July 10, 1882. 
July 8. VERNQX CAMPBELL, Secretary. 

ZEITSKA INSTITUTE, 

NO. 922 POST STREET. 

Day and Boarding School for Tonng Ladies and Children. 
KINDERGARTEN. Next Term will commence July 24th. To secure admis- 
sion for boarding" pupils, applications should be made as early as possible. 
May 13. MADAME B. ZEITSKA, A.M., Principal. 



WM. H. V. CRONISE, 

in ins. W.E. corner of Montgomery and California streets. 

No. 29. Office Hours: 11 a.m. to 2 p.m. June 10. 

REMOVAL. 

T Wad ham has removed to Boom 2, No. 528 California St., 
_J» Bank Commission erB' Office. June 10. 

epairlusr Watches aud Jewelry, So. 39 Third Street. 

[July 22.1 D. L. LEVY. 



M 



R 



20 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



July 22. 1882. 



COMMENTS ON FOREIGN AFFAIRS. 
For a first-claBS article of unadulterated "cheek," commend us to 
the Sublime Porte— which is the same thing as saying the Sultan. With 
a characteristic commingling of apathy and cunning, that worthy, doubt- 
less by advice of his entourage, has calmly sat by in digni6ed silence till 
Alexandria is in ruins and England has done all the work, and now at last 
lazily consents to have something to say in settling the difficulty. The 
text of Said Pasha's reply to the identical note of the Powers is to the 
effect that if the Porte has not hitherto decided on its own initiative to 
send troops to Egypt, it is because it was convinced that vigorous meas- 
ures were avoidable. Observing, with satisfaction, that the Powers have 
formally and repeatedly recorded their deference to the incontestable and 
unquestioned rights and sovereignty of the Sultan, he, Said Pasha, by the 
Sultan's order, informs the Embassadors that the Porte consents to par- 
ticipate in a new Conference. This is a very easy way of getting out of 
the difficulty — if it only works. We think it will work, because it is our 
private opinion that the unspeakable Turk is acting throughout in accord- 
ance with England's wishes. The Sultan knows full well that John Bull 
is his best friend — not because he hives him best, but because his interests 
demand that Turkey shall not fall into the hands of the other European 
Powers. But at the same time there is a frozen impudence about the 
Porte's diplomacy which must command admiration, even though it calls 
for little respect. 

We by no means agree with our contemporaries in their belief that the 
struggle with Arabi Pasha is going to be one of long duration. It is true 
that it has been already prolonged by the halting policy of Gladstone's 
Government — first, by not using force upon less serious provocation; and 
secondly, by not backing up the naval victory with a land force, which 
would not only have prevented much destruction of property, but would 
have done for Arabi's army what the ships did for the forts. But, for all 
that, there is no reason to believe that the Rebellion (for it is nothing 
else) will have a long life. Arabi may intrench himself as strongly as he 
can, he may cut o£F water supplies from the British, and persuade the 
Bedouins to join his standard; he may even succeed in bringing about a 
holy war — and that is the event most to be dreaded — but nevertheless he 
must succumb, and that in quick order, to the superior military skill and 
armament, to say nothing of numbers, which will surely be opposed to 
him. Of course, he may retire into the interior so far that it would not 
be worth while to follow him, but in Egypt proper he will never make a 
stand of any consequence. 

The result of it all is still difficult to foretell, but there can be little 
doubt that England will repay herself for her trouble and expense by lay- 
ing hands on the Suez CanaL Port Said and Suez, at either end of the 
channel, will henceforth virtually, if not actually, be British possessions. 
Certainly small fault can be found with England in thus asserting her 
right to protect the highway to her Eastern Empire, especially in the 
light of recent events, which show that the first act of hostility on the 
part of Arabi Pasha would have been the destruction of the canal, had 
he only been able to accomplish it. Such a barbarous act of vandalism 
would be deplored by all Christendom, and if England undertakes to 
henceforth secure the canal against destruction she will find few to dis- 
pute the privilege with her. 

By the wav. what is De Lesseps making ao much noise about the Suez 
Canal for? He helped to make it, it is true, but to hear him dictating to 
the Powers one would think he owned it. 

The French ministerial crisis is thought to be at an end, since in 
the Chamber, on Thursday last, several Deputies declared that their 
votes were in no way aimed at the Cabinet. Jules Ferry stated that 
President Grevy had refused to accept the resignation of Ministers. Some 
Radical members endeavored to reopen the discussion on the question of 
Central Maire. but the Chamber finally passed— 276 to 105— to the order 
of the day, implying confidence in the Government and leaving aside the 
question of the Maire. 

The destruction of centuries is to be repaired. For nearly six hundred 
years the waters of the Zuyder Zee have rolled over what was once dry 
land, and ships have sailed where carriages may have traveled. Several 
of the wealthiest financiers of Holland have now determined upon con- 
centrating their energies in an attempt to reclaim the tract of land which 
has so long been lost to their country, and they are already engaged in 
the surveys for a new set of those "gigantic piles" which are commemo- 
rated in the verses of Andrew Marvell. Dykes which will far outstrip the 
stupendous works on the Island of JValcheren are in contemplation, and 
they will be built to such a bight and of such a thickness as to stand the 
shock of the fiercest seas that may dash against them. Many years must 
necessarily pass away before works of this character can be completed, but 
if they should happily be brought to a successful issue another engineering 
wonder will have been added to the triumphs of Dutch enterprise. 

Americans generally are disgusted with the open boasting of the 
O'Donnovan Rosea gang, that tbey are organizing for the purpose of em- 
ploying explosives to destroy English lives and property. Nobody be- 
lieves that these infamous schemes will ever amount to anything further 
than "cheap talk," but it is not agreeable to real Americans to contem- 
plate a Constitution which makes it possible for foreign renegades and 
murderers to call themselves our "fellow-citizens." 

In reply to a question put in the HouBe of Commons recently, Mr. 
Childers said that he did not know what became of the 100,000 to 200,000 
rifles sold in 1878 by the War Department. Now comes the singular 
statement that the Mayor of a town possessing a large number of Irish 
residents bought some thousands of them, at about half a crowu, or three 
and sixpence apiece. He then advertised throughout the district that any 
one who cared to buy goods at his shop to the value of ten or twenty 
shillings should be presented with one of the discarded War Office fire- 
arms. The bait took. In a very short time the whole parcel was dis- 
posed of, and some thousand rifles were, by the agency of this enterpris- 
ing Mayor placed in the hands of private individuals— to be used, no 
doubt, for purposes of their own. 



ASSESSMENT MINES. 
The recent decision of the Supreme Court in the case of the Santa 
Cruz Railroad Company vs. Clans Spreckels, which says that corporations 
have no power to levy assessments upon stock issued as fully paid up, 
naturally attracts much attention amongst mining Directors, who, per- 
chance, possess some financial responsibility. The questiou arises whether, 
the collection of assessments being illegal, shareholders may not recover 
the amount already paid in. California, recognizing the unlimited wealth 
of her mines, and knowing their development would necessarily be 
through incorporations, wisely in its Constitution and equitable laws pro 
vided for the protection of shareholders, and made Directors and Trustees 

! responsible under heavy penalties for irregularities occurring during their of- 
ficial administration. For illustration, the Albion Consolidated Mining 

: Company has so far collected $445,000 in coin, present assessment, delin- 
quent 31st inst, $37,500, which if paid would still leave the Company some 
560,000 in debt, all of which, and most likely a hundred thousand in ad- 
dition, present manipulators hope to collect from owners. Unquestion- 

i ably those in command hold a very large amount of stock, that they an- 
ticipated floating upon the market with the same facility they did in May, 
1881, when they unloaded some seventy-five to one hundred thousand 
shares within a few days, at prices ranging from §5 50 down to $3 50 per 
share, since which time the assessments actually paid in exceed the pres- 
ent value of the stock. Outsiders having learned by experience that their 

I telegrams and representations had better be taken in small quantities, fail 

, to respond to the many inducements offered by those gentlemen to give 
away at nominal figures such an enormously valuable prospect. Evidently 

! large holders don't care to work the many claims belonging to the corpo- 
ration, and are willing that dealers generally should contribute the nec- 

i essary funds, say $25,000 per month. By the way, what has become of 
the 5,000 tons of ore in sight, average value §73 per ton, exclusive of lead, 

i referred to by Judge Leonard in his decision May 16th, 1882, in the Rose 
vs. Albion case, requiring the Richmond Company to give bonds for 
$425,000, subsequently reduced by the United States Supreme Court to 
$20,000? What has become of the many thousand tons high-grade ores 

; which have been accumulating for the past two years awaiting the de- 
cision of the case referred to ? As near as we can learn the net product 

! so far does not exceed $10,000, notwithstanding they commenced hauling 

i ores to the Eureka furnaces June 13th. The last letter on file in the 

, office was dated June 29tb, and now it appears the letter-book is not visi- 

' ble at all, according to the imperative requirements of the law. We sus- 
pect it has been removed for revision before being again submitted to 
shareholders. We learn that several shareholders intend to protest against 
the collection of the present assessment, and propose to select a compe- 
tent person to make inquiries relative to the several hundred thousands 
of dollars alreadj* paid in. 

CUM GRANO SALIS. 
The St. Petersburg correspondent of the Voltaire guarantees the 
authenticity of the following statement: Shortly after the opening of the 
Moscow Exhibition, which was recently inaugurated by the Grand Duke 
Vladimir, a young man demanded an audience of the Chief of the Police 
of St. Petersburg. He refused to state his errand to any of the subordi- 
nate officials, so after being carefully searched he was admitted to the 
presence of the General. Here he stated at once that he was sent by the 
Revolutionary Party, and explained his mission in the following terms: — 
'* The Emperor is prevented from going to Moscow by his fear of our 
schemes. His dread will cease to be justified whenever he grants a Con- 
stitution. Then he need fear no conspiracy, and can go in safety where- 
ever he pleases. It has fallen to my lot to inform you that if the Em- 
peror persists in his reactionary policy nothing can save him. Neither 
my friends nor myself wish to murder him treacherously. Alexander 
III. is warned, as was Alexander II. We do not assassinate, but we 
render justice." At this point of the interview the police officer seemed 
anxious to call in assistance, but the young Nihilist stopped him and 
added : " I do not wish to be subjected to the indignity of torture. In 
coming here I have sacrificed my life. I could have killed you, but we 
do not commit murders uselessly." With these words the youth stepped 
back a few paces and knocked two large buttons, with which his cuffs 
were fastened, against his forehead. The buttons, being full of an explo- 
sive substance, burst, and inflicted such wounds on the young man that he 
expired in a few moments, leaving no trace as to his identity. This sen- 
sational incident has reminded the public that the murder of Alexander 
II. was preceded by similar warnings. 



A curious cargo, consisting of a large collection of elephants, giraffes, 
ostriches, lions, hippopotami, apes, baboons, has just arrived at New 
York from Nubia, Mr. Reiche, the owner, must be a proud man, for he 
is Baid to have only one competitor in the world in this adventurous bu- 
siness. Every year, it seems, he sends four men to Hanrahan, a settle- 
ment on the borders of Abyssinia and Nubia, where he owns a large tract 
of land and a bunting station. The nearest town is Cassala, an Arabian 
settlement in the middle of Nubia, and that is a twenty-seven days' 
journey, across the Nubian desert, to the nearest seaport, Soukin, on the 
Red Sea. According to the account of one of the party, after leaving 
New York last year, he, with his assistants, went to Soukin, going across 
the desert to Cassala, where sixty horses were purchased, and the services 
of as many natives obtained from the Arab sheiks, who in return receive 
skins and elephant tusks. Upon arriving at the hunting station, where 
over 1,000 goats are kept to allure the wild beasts and supply milk for 
young animals and huntsmen, the Europeans go out with a score of 
natives, and in the country around plenty of animals are killed, while 
the young ones are captured. Goats are taken on the hunting expeditions 
to supply milk for cubs. When enough game is captured the party re- 
turns to the camp. The smaller animals are carried in cages on the backs 
of camels and the larger ones walk. The horses are sold at Cassala, and 
from there across the desert to Soukin camels alone are used, in the late 
caravan numbering eighty-seven. 

Some one once said to an Italian sculptor, " I cannot understand how 
it is that the legs of your nymphs and Venuses are so abnormally thin," 
" I have," he replied, " a wife, as yon know. She is jealous, and she re- 
gards her own legB as perfection. Were I to give my female statues proper 
legs, my domestic bliss would cease." 





(faliforuia Adirrtiscr. 




Vol. 33. 



SAN FRANOISOO, SATUBDAT, JULY 29, 1882. 



NO. 3. 



G 



OLD BAUS-$W@910-Kr.nNEh Silver— U.i@ll? tf cent.dis.ount, 
M<\k-*n Dollars, S\ut '■' p*I cent, disc, nom. 

■ Exchange on New York, 60. fe?$100 premium ; On London Rank- 
er*. 49$1 ; Commercial, 49§@40Jd. PariB, sight, 5-12.J franca per 
dollar. Eastern Telegrams, 10c. 

"Price of M.tncy here, G@10 per cent, per year— bank rate. In the 
upen market, 1@1J per month. Demand light. On Bond Security, 
;l<jM$ per cent, per year on Call. 

" Latest price of Sterling in New York, 486@489. 

PRICES OF LEADING STOCKS AND GOV. BONDS. 

Son Franrineo July 28. 1883. 



Stocks and Bond*. 
■OHM, 
Cal. Stale lkmds, d'tt/67 
S. F. Ciiv * c'.i. B'J». 6s, "SS 
S. P. City* Co. Li'ds.73 ... 
Monttf'v Av. Bonds 

Dupont Street Bonda — . 

BHTimsntO i-'ity Bonda 

i City Bonda 

Yuba County Bonds 

Marysville City Bonds 

Santa Clara Co. Bonds 

Los Angeles County Bonds. 
Los Angeles Citv Bonds.... 
Viry'a & Truckoe R. R. Bds. 
Nevada Co. X. U. R. R. Bds 

Oakland City Bonds 

Oregon II & N. Bonds, (is.. 

S P. R. R- Bonds 

U S.4S. 

BASKS. 

Bank ol California (cx-div). 

Pacinc Bank(ex-div) 

First National (ex-div) 

INSl'RASCK COMI'AMKS. 

Union (ex-div) 

Fireman's Fund (ex-div)... 

California (ex-div) 

Pacific Boiling Mills, 120, 
Vulcan Powder, 80J, 67i- 

Outside of the leadinj 
quotations are virtually 



Bid. 

106 
Nom 

Nom. 

37 

40 

60 
lii^i 

90 

90 
105 
10(1 
110 
101 
110 

107 
105 
120J 

168 
125 



leked i Stocks and Bonds. 

tKSCRANCK COMPANIES 

— S(a(c Investment 

Nom. Home .Mutual 

Nom. Commercial 

45 Western 

60 RAILROADS. 

521 C. P. R. R. Stock 

— iC. P. R. h. Bonds .. . 

100 City Railroad 

100 Omnibus R. R 

107 X, B. and .Mission R. R. 

110 Sutter Street R. R 

— Geary Street R. R. 

103 Central R. R. Co 

114 Market Street R. R.... 

125 Clav Street Hill R. R . . 

109 S. F. Gaslight Co 

1117 Oakland Gaslight Co ... 

121 Sae'to Gasligh t Co 

Califor'a Powder Co ... 

— Giant Powder Co (new stck) 
128 Atlantic Giant Powder 

— Gold and Stock Telee"h Co 
S. V. W. W. Co. 'g Stock... 
S. V. W. W.Co' Bonds.... 
Pacific Coast S.S.Co's Stock 
California Street R R, 



123 125 
128 132 
125 126 

126. Cala. Dry Dock, 55, 60. Safe Deposit 



122 


125 


130 


— 


12,-, 


127 


103 


109 


96 


97 


1161 


1171 


96 


VH 


45 


— 


98 


100 


80 


— 


99 


100 


55 


60 


Nom. 


Nom 


Nom. 


Nom 


611 


021 


301 
62J 


31 


65 


115 


— 


116 


120 


76 


77 


641 


651 
114| 


114J 


119 


120 



107 110 
Co., 45,451. 



; Powder stocks there is but little doing, and our 
unchanged. 

Andrew Baird, 312 California st. 



Railroad Combinations. — C. P. Huntington, Vice-President of the 
Central Pacific Railroad and President of the Chesapeake and Ohio, ar- 
rived here Sunday from New York, and is staying at the Palace. Mr. 
Huntington has not been in the city for over two years. He is accom- 
panied by his wife and children, and pleasure is the motive of his visit, 
when President Leland Stanford was in the East, he, in conjunction 
with Mr. Huntington, perfected arrangements with the Louisiana and 
Great Western and the Texas and New Orleans lines, the combined dis- 
tance of which is 1,500 miles of railroad, known as the Morgan system, 
and thus secured to the Southern Pacific and, the Chesapeake and Ohio 
lines, whose interests are of course identical, a complete connection East 
and South. 

Meteorological Summary, week ending 7:58 P. m., Thursday. July 
27tb:— Highest barometer, 30.180— 23d; lowest, 29.883— 25th ; average 
during the week, 30.019 ; maximum temperature, 71 — 24th ; minimum, 
52.5 — 25th ; average during the week, 58.4 ; highest relative humidity, 
93 per cent. — 21st and 22d ; lowest relative humidity, 57 per cent. — 24th ; 
average during the week, — ; prevailing direction of wind, west; maxi- 
mum hourly velocity of wind, 31 miles per hour, 23d ; average weather 
during the week, fair ; rainfall during the week, .00 ; total rainfall, sea- 
son of 1882-83, 0.00 inches. 



Latest from the Merchant's Exchange. — New York, July 28, 
1882. United States Bonds— Is, 120§; 4£s, 114| ; ex-5s, lOlg; ex-6s, 101J. 
Sterling Exchange, 4 86(5*4 89. Pacinc Mail, 47. Wheat, 120@124; West- 
ern Union, 89 J. Hides, 24@24£. Wool — Spring, fine, 20 @ 32; Burry, 
15@20 ; Pulled, 20@45 ; Fall Clips, 15@18 ; Burry, 12@14. Lon- 
don, July 28.— Liverpool Wheat Market, 9s. lld.@10s.2d., Cal.; 9s. 10d.@ 
10s. 6d. Red Am. Spring. Bonds, 4s, 121 ; 4£s, — ; ex-6s, — . Consols, 
99 13-16. Money, 99g acct.; Silver, 52. 



The building of the Harmon Seminary, for young ladies, has just 
been completed at Berkeley. The building is three stories high and is in 
the villa style of architecture. It will accommodate fifty regular board- 
ing scholars, and will be conducted by the Rev. S. S. Harmon and Mrs. 
F. W. Harmon. 



Caliiornians Abroad, July 8th, 1882. 
Mrs. Jackson McKenty, San Francisco. 



- Baden-Baden: Mr. and 



MARRIOTT'S AEROPLANE COMPANY, 

For NnvlKatluff (In- Air. 

Office of the Aeroplane Company for Navigating the Air, 609 Mer- 
chant street. Office hours from 1 to 2 P.u. 



Ordern for EujrrnvliiK in (in- Photo-Enirrnvlng- I>rocc<*« cnu 
now be executed at the '*5few» Letter" Office tor lean Umn 
hall the cost hi Wood Engraving, and In one-hair the time. 
Remember, we f iir-iish a hard metal Electrotype ready for 
the Press. 

TABLE OF CONTENTS. 



An Interesting- Art Gallery . .15 

A Tanialpais Hop \ . 3 

An Episode of the Conldinir-Spni.-'nu 

Scandal 10 

A Novel hi ;i Nutshell 4 

A Successful Opening 5 

Albion Con. Milling Company 2 

Biz 18 

Comments on Foreign Affairs 20 

Cradle, Altar and Tomb IS 

Clinging to the Hast (Poetrj-) S 

Electricity, Etc 5 

Foreign Notes 14 

General Fremont 10 

Items from the British Trade Journal. . 4 

Local Notes 14 

Literary Notes 9 

Miscellaneous Tables 1 



Notabilia 17 

Our Views of Four Year* Ay Sustained. 10 

Pleasure's Wand 6 

Piieifk- Coast and Eastern Notes 14 

Real Estate Transactions 18 

Sporting Items 7 

Society 3 

Sunbeams 12 

Sneath's Bounce 20 

Sketches from Nature 20 

The Old Man's Funeral (Poetry) 4 

The Sandwich Islands 10 

Town Crier 11 

There Is No Death (Poetry) 9 

Thine (Poetry) 6 

That Van Ness Tragedy 2 

Tricks of Trade , 8 

The World, the Flesh and the Devil.. ..13 



London, July 28.— Latest Price of Consols, 99 13-16. 



News from Guatemala. — Guatemala, notwithstanding the absence 
of her President, "Barrios, who is being feted at Washington, seems de- 
termined not to be behind in the race of progress. Last year the Govern- 
ment imported an opera company for the amusement of its citizens, at an 
expense of 850,000. The company were successful there, but afterwards 
performed in this city under the management of the old veteran, Eianchi, 
and, owing to discord among themselves, made a most lamentable failure. 
Now, a company organized under the laws of this State, having received a 
valuable concession for the Government of Guatemala, are building a 
railroad from Ttetahulen to the port of Champerico. The contract pro- 
vides for a subsidy of 8700,000, secured by a percentage on the duties re- 
ceived at that port, and also a grant of alternate sections of land of 
1,000 caballerias each, a caballeria being equal to about 33J acres. The 
concession is considered to be an extremely valuable one. 

The Grand Jury. — The following gentlemen have been sworn as 
Grand Jurors: F. A. Waterhouse, J. B. Stetson, D. D. Shattuck, Chas. 
W. Whitney, C. F. Bassett, H. S. Bunker, J. A. Taggart, J. C. Johnson, 
Herman Kollman, R. Rosenthal, B. Dore, W. S. Dodge, C. Adams, E. 
M. Root, Ira P. Rankin, George L. Darling, Solomon Gump, M. P. 
Jones, Piatt Conklin. J. B. Stetson was appointed foreman. 

'* David Crocket." — This favorite old ship has at length arrived from 
New York, in a passage of 157 days, and is consigned to John Rosenfeld. 
She brings a valuable cargo of merchandise. She encountered a fearful 
gale on May 30tb, in latitude 45 South, longitude 89 West, in the course 
of which her main bulwarks and nearly all her monkey rail were stove in, 
and other damage w as sustained. 

A rich tobacconist at New Orleans, a native of Spain and Carlist 
exile, lately died, leaving the bulk of bis estate to ex-Secretary Hunt, 
now Minister to Russia. Of late years Mr. Hunt has been in somewhat 
embarrassed circumstances, but thiB unexpected gift of his old friend and 
admirer will render him one of the wealthiest men in the Diplomatic 
Service. 

General James Grant Wilson, now in England, has been spending 
several days at Strath fieldsaye, with the the Duke of Wellington, who has 
presented him with the " Iron Duke's " dispatches, etc., in 31 octavo vol- 
umes. A noble gift and a noble monument to his distinguished father. 

The " Escambia." — This British iron steamer, wrecked on the bar out- 
ward bound some weeks ago, and of which hopes of raising her were en- 
tertained, is now said to have gone to pieces — broken up — and the vessel 
and wheat cargo gone to <l Davy Jones' Locker." 

The Members of the Zion Church, on Stockton street, held a very in- 
teresting memorial service, on Sunday last, in commemoration of the 
Rev. H. H. Garnet, IT. S. Minister to Liberia. An eloquent eulogy of 
the deceased was delivered by Rev. H. J. Davis. 

The directors of the Colorado Mortgage and Investment Company of 
London (Limited) recommended for the past year a dividend of 10 pei 
cent, (of which 5 per cent, was paid in January last) and a bonus of 5 per 
cent. 

Entered at the Post-Office at San Francisco, Cat,, as Second-Class 
JMCatter. 



Printed and Published by the Proprietor, Frederick Marriott, 607 to 616 Merchant Street, San PrandMO, California. 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER AND 



July 29, 1882. 



AIiBION CON. MINING COMPANY. 

Superintendent Robinson, having completed his " explanatory 
visit " to San Francisco, extending through a period of several weeks, has 
returned to his field of labor and assessments. He appears as sanguine 
as to the future of these several claims as at any time during the past four 
years, and talks so earnestly about the Albion that one is almost tempted 
to think that he really believes what he is talking about. Many opera- 
tors, however, having painful financial recollection of recent assurances 
and estimates, while willing to concede his sincerity, lack confidence in 
bis judgment — remembering his statements, indorsed by the foreman of 
the mine, Mr. Williams, " with a reputation of being prudent in estimat- 
ing ore prospects," who was " willing to guarantee, from ore in sight, 
enough high grade to run the Eureka furnaces to their full capacity of 200 
tons daily for six months — say 200 tons for 182Jdays, 36,500 tons, average 
value S7f>, §2,737,500. The fact appears to be that, after months of pre- 
paration, and the selection of the best ores available, the shipments ag- 
gregate about S15.0U0, or say 10 cents per share on the capital stock, 
while the assessments since the consolidation amount to S2.65 cents per 
share. Comment is unnecessary. 

We are crowded with inquiries relative to the Albion and its manage- 
ment, and are daily in receipt of congratulations from readers who, 
through information in the News Letter, ably seconded by the Daily 
Report, have been put in inquiry, and thus saved hundreds of thousands 
of dollars. We have secured the services of a thoroughly competent cor- 
respondent at Eureka, and shall be able in future to give reliable advices 
about this property, which, owing to its proximity to, and recent litiga- 
tion witb, the Richmond has acquired undue notoriety. Fortunately, 
many of our leading operators have a keen remembrance of the manner 
in which this same Board of manipulators have absorbed several millions 
of dollars, leaving shareholders with the consolation that, as money is in- 
destructible, some one has received the benefit of their disbursements. 
The recent decline in value of shares, and the indisposition of operators 
to deal in them, except in a limited way, clearly indicates that they are 
willing that those who control, and will control its destinies for the next 
six months, may have the whole of it, feeling assured that, should future 
developments prove it to be of any value, they will own it all; otherwise, 
none of it. 

We are confidentially advised that President Robinson, having reduced 
his interest to a nominal figure, has quietly subsided; no more telegrams, 
no more assurances of "large quantities of high grade ores, and the abili- 
ty to keep it up for an indefinite period." He contents himself with the 
reduction of indebtedness, the collection of assessments, the payment of 
his salary of 86,000 per annum, together with contingent expenses; the 
manipulation of §300,000 per annum, which some shareholders have 
cheerfully contributed since the consolidation. 

Since writing the above we are in receipt of the following confirmatory 
information from our own correspondent at Eureka, which unquestionably 
will greatly interest our readers: " The St. Lawrence Company is a Cal- 
ifornia corporation. This Company owns several claims covering the 
mining ground out of which the Albion Company is now taking ore. In 
fact, the claims owned by the St. Lawrence Company cover all of the 
claims owned by the Albion Company that are of any value. Several of 
the claims of the St. Lawrence Company are older than the Uncle Sam, 
or any other claim owned by the Albion. Nearly all of the St. Lawrence 
stock is owned by the Richmond, and the Trustees are prepared at any 
time to take such action as the Richmond Company may deem advisable. 
The managers of the Richmond are of opinion that the recent suits 
brought by the Richmond against the Albion have given the Albion a fic- 
titious importance in public estimation ; that as long as the Albion was 
enjoined from taking out ore the Albion manipulators, by subsidizing two 
or three newspapers and by dint of lying, were able to deceive the public 
in relation to the size of the ore bodies found in ground claimed by the Al- 
bion, and in the assay value of the ore per ton, and in this way keep stock 
really worthless at a figure that would enable the manipulators to make 
money out of the stock, and that the best way to burst the Albion bub- 
ble and expose the swindle was to permit the Company to take out the 
ore and sell or work it. The stock has declined steadily since they com- 
menced taking out ore. I am infurmed that they have gouged out most 
of the ore of any value, and have little except low-grade stuff left, that 
will scarcely pay them to take out, and even that will soon be exhausted. 
If my information be correct, and I believe it is, only a few weeks more 
will be required to uncover one of the most infamous swindles ever prac- 
ticed on the people of this country. No returns of ore sold by the Albion 
have been made to the Assessor, as the law requires. The excuse for not 
making the returns given by the Eureka Company for the purchase is, 
that they have nut compared assays as yet with the Albion, and made a 
settlement, and that they will make a*worn statement as soon as they 
have done so, as required by law. When they do, the Albion stockholders 
will obtain information that will show them how abominably false were 
the telegrams sent immediately after they commenced taking out ores." 



Last Saturday evening a most enjoyable hop was given at the 
"Rural Home," Alameda, by the ladies of that establishment, with the 
kind co-operation and assistance of the hostess, Mrs. Briggs. The spa- 
cious dining-hall was beautifully decorated with choice evergreens, inter- 
spersed with elegant floral designs, wreaths, etc. The floor had been 
prepared for dancing, and was in splendid condition. Exquisite music 
was on hand, to the strains of which dancing was indulged in up to mid- 
night, at which time a delicious supper was partaken of. Afterwards 
those present indulged in various parlor games and other social amuse- 
ments, and such an enjoyable time was spent that the party did not break 
up until quite a late— or, rather, an early — hour. The ladies of the 
"Rural Home," who designed and carried out this little entertainment, 
are social geniuses in their way, and the manner in which they managed 
the little affair of Saturday is something they have a right to be proud of. 



Those of our readers who desire to obtain well fitting, well made, 
durable clothes, we advise to go to Messrs. J. M. Litchfield & Co., 
merchant tailors, 415 Montgomery street. Messrs. Litchfield & Co. have 
on hand a large stock of the best material and the latest patterns. Their 
cutters are men of experience and artistic skill, and they employ none 
but reliable workmen. This firm has also on hand a large supply of all 
the latest novelties in gents' furnishing goods. 



THAT VAN NESS TRAGEDY. 

The tragic event which occurred on Van Ness Avenue last Wednes- 
day forenoon points a moral and adorns a tale. The action of the unfor- 
tunate young man who, in the frenzy of his love, attempted to take the 
life of the object of his great affection, cannot be defended or justified ; 
but the circumstances which surround the unfortunate occurrence are 
such as to show that he is a proper object for charitable pity rather than 
for harsh criticism. The deep sentiment of love which he entertained for 
his wife cannot be doubted. The fact that in marrying her he deliberately 
placed himself in a position where he was liable to lose a fortune of some 
millions, and was obliged for some time to earn his living as an ordinary 
clerk, is sufficient evidence of the depth of his love to convince any un- 
prejudiced tnind. The desperate act of which he was guilty on Wednes- 
day last, and for which he is now on trial at the bar of public opinion, is 
in itself irrefutable evidence of the maddening, passionate attachment 
which he cherished for his wife. It is utterly unreasonable to suppose 
that he would have attempted to perpetrate any such terrible act, had his 
mind not been unhinged by the deep-seated and abiding love which he 
bore for this woman, and which, rightly or wrongly, he conceived was 
treated with scorn and trampled in dishonor. 

Whether there was any real, substantial foundation for the suspicions 
which young Mr, Sachs entertained regarding his wife's fidelity, is a ques- 
tion which, at this time, we have no information which justifies \is in 
forming or expressing an opinion ; but, even assuming, as we are all bound 
to do when we have no positive information to the contrary, that this sus- 
picion was not justified by facts, we cannot but regard the unfortunate 
lady as being largely responsible for the occurence of Wednesday. That 
jealousy which seems to have been making this young man's life a hell 
upon earth, for some time past, could easily have been allayed. There 
was no necessity to feed it. We are told that Mrs. Sachs is an unusually 
prepossessing lady, and that she attracted a great deal of attention. She 
could, and she should, have repelled, rather than encouraged, this atten- 
tion when she found that her receiving it gave great pain to the man who 
loved her so madly. Had she done so, the violent incident of which we 
are writing would not have occurred. She should have been satisfied with 
the love and admiration and society of her husband and children. It is 
all nonsense to talk about her being of " a lively disposition." She should 
have curbed that liveliness. She should have been proud of the fact that 
she had inspired her husband with such an overmastering regard for her, 
and she should have shown, by her devotion to hirn, that she was worthy 
of it. That is what a good woman would have done, and it would have 
disarmed jealousy in a very short time. Had Mrs. Sachs done so she 
would not have been assailed with a pistol in the hands of an infuriated 
husband. There are many other ladies to whom we commend these re- 
marks. Married women should be satisfied with the attention and ad- 
miration of their husbands, and they should discourage the attentions of 
other men, no matter how innocent they may be. This is the moral which 
adorns the tale. 

Miss Helen 'Barry, one of the most prominent English actresses of 
the day, and up to recently manageress of the Royal Court Theatre, Lon- 
don, is at present stopping at the Palace Hotel. Miss Barry is making a 
tour of the world, in search of health and pleasure. It wass Miss 
Barry's intention, upon her recent marriage, to altogether abandon the 
stage; but, owing to the pressure which has been brought to bear upon her 
by those anxious to see her display her great histrionic powers, she has 
consented to temporarily return to her profession. Miss Barry possesses 
great advantages of person, her carriage is imposing, and her art culti- 
vated. Her great personation is "Armande," in Led Astray. It is within 
the bounds of possibility that we may see Miss Barry behind the foot- 
lights in San Francisco. 

Mr. James Hagan, who died at San Jose, on Wednesday last, was a 
gentleman well and favorably known in this community. Thirty years 
ago he built the gas works at the back of the old Metropolitan Theatre in 
this city. Subsequently he associated himself with J. K. Prior, of this 
city, and, together, they organized a Company, built the San Jose" 
Gas Works, Mr. Hagan and Mr. Prior alternating as President of the 
Company, which position was held by Mr. Hagan at the time of his 
death. Mr. Hagan had been suffering from paralysis for about a year 
past, and on Tuesday afternoon he received another stroke, which proved 
fatal. He was 52 years of age. 

BALDWIN'S THEATRE. 

MONDAT July 31st, 

Will Commence tlie 
THIRD AND LAST WEEK 

OF ... . 

THE HANLONS, 

IN 

Le Voyage en Suisse. 

Extra Performance SUNDAY NIGHT, July 30th. 



FAREWELL TO CALIFORNIA 



Pin Us Hall. Hominy Evening, July 31st, Thursday and 
Friday fc.veni.ngs, August 3d and 4th. The 

Mendelssohn Quintette Clnb ! 

Of Boston, assisted by MISS CORA R. MILLER. Among the special attractions to 
be presented at these Concerts will be Three Entire Quartettes by Beethoven, in- 
cluding Two of the Celebrated Rassoumofsky Set, and the Famous Harp Quartette. 
ADMISSION, SI. No Extra Charge for Reserved Seats. Boxes, $5 and $7. Box 
Sheet open at Gray's Music Store. July 29. 

MECHANICS' INSTITUTE FAIR, 

AT THE PAVILION, 
LVRKIN STREET NEAR MARKET, 



TTTESDJ.'Y, J.TJOVST 1BTB. 

[July 29.] 



July 29, 188^ 



CALIFORNIA ADVERTISER 



8 



SOCIETY. 



July 27, 1882. I had UtUe td«« when I alluileri hurt week to ■ aoaUl 
ttiiUml m ltltlj In iim in. tlnl II would n boob molt Id what might 

hiivf l».-ii ji shocking urafrody. Hut nil tin- atronnutanoBi b'i> t<> prova 
that ona '-*ii m-ver jadgt oy appaaranoea. Wealth doefl oot alwayi 

ODb4do8 to bAppiiifH!*, ami the apparently most harmonious houaeholu 
have their skeleton In the oloaeta, Those who are supposed to have the 
least naive t.> trouble them, often have the weightiest, and there being bo 
littli* nnpeoted nuke then the harder to bear ami hide. This i.i not the 
only one that ha* been prophesied of late, but moot truly do I hope the 
other* will not eventuate in like attempt* at murder. 

The presence b the efty of Judge and Mrs. Field, and of Miss Bord- 
Htein. who || a visitor at Mrs. l>an Cootfs, have been the motif for a 
variety of entertainments in their house, conniatinf? of lunches, dinners and 
dauces, the rjnri being Mrs. Dan Cook, Mrs. J. B. Haggin, General 
and Mrs. McDowell, Mrs. Judge Lake and others. The Haggin dinner 
was a large and very elaborate affair, the family connection m;ikin_' quite 
a erowd in themselves. The house has been greatly enlivened and bright- 
ened by the presence in it of charming little Mrs. Withington, who will 
remain as Mrs. Haggin's guest during her husband's absence at the Sand- 
wich Islands which will be of some weeks duration. The Field's have 
but recently returned from a long and pleasant visit to the Sharon's at 
Belmont, and in fact have been very extensively entertained during their 
present visit to the city. 

The dance given by Airs. Masten last week for her daughters, previous 
to their return to school, was of the small and early description, names 
being interspersed with the dancing, and was one of the liveliest parties 
ever given by that hostess. I am told by one who was there that it was 
far more enjoyable than any big ball he ever was at in his life, aud he 
wishes they were of more frequent occurrence. 

The " hop" at the Presidio on Tuesday evening partook largely of an 
informal character, and though the attendance was not large, it was a 
very pleasant gathering. The prettiest girl there was considered to be 
Miss Hattie Myrick, who, I understand, we are soon to lose from our 
society, as in September next she will become the wife of Major Whitney, 
U. S. A., and in future — or aa much of the future as the changes of army 
life permit— they will reside at San Diego. Her pretty face and lively 
disposition, which renders her so pleasant a companion, will be much 
missed by her many friends and admirers in 'Frisco. 

Another engagement lately announced is that of Mr. Ashton and Miss 
Bessie Raymond, daughter of J. W. Raymond, the whilome steamship 
agent. The young lady is noted for her attractive manner and startling 
beauty, and it is, therefore, a matter of wonder that she has not sooner 
been secured by some lucky fellow to brighten his life and home. 

Ned Newhall has just become a Benedict, having been married in New 
York last Thursday to Miss Jennie Whiting, a young lady of much beauty 
and talent, being rather of the blue-stocking order. I dare say we shall 
see them in this direction ere long. 

This is the wedding day of Miss Lilly Buckbee, the clergyman's 
daughter, and Mr. Robert Curry, Judge Curry's son. The ceremony will 
be a very private one, confined to the most intimate friends of the parties 
concerned. 

The watering places are rapidly thinning out, which is generally the 
case after the Fourth of July, and those of their visitors who have country 
homes of their own are now entertaining a succession of guests either for 
the day or for a week at a time. Among those who have lately returned 
to town can be mentioned the Tallants, Colliers, Harry Mays (who, by 
the by, are at Menlo Park), Judge Hoffman, Mrs. McLaughlin, etc. The 
Schmiedells are expected in town some time next month. The Hagers 
have gone to Santa Cruz. Mr. Robert Sherwood and his family have 
gone East, expecting to proceed shortly to Europe, one motive being to 
visit his recently married daughter, Mrs. Greyrigge, at her home in York- 
shire. 

Mrs. M. S. Latham, accompanied by her son, young " Milt.," and her 
brother, Thurlow McMullin, arrived from New York on Monday last. 
They brought with them the remains of her late husband, and on Tues- 
day he was laid away in his beautiful tomb, "Eternal Rest," at Laurel 
Hill Cemetery. The ceremony was of the most private character, being 
attended by only a few of the most intimate personal friends of the de- 
ceased ex-banker. Mrs. Latham is at present visiting her stepfather and 
his wife, on Post street. 

There are always plenty of rumors afloat, some true and others the re- 
verse. One that I heard lately, and which I give for what it is worth, as 
I cannot vouch for its authenticity, is to the effect that we are not likely 
to lose the McDowells on the General's retirement from the Army, as, 
having become attached to the Pacific Coast, they will make 'Frisco their 
future home, and to that end the General has bought a lot on California 
street, whereon he will soon erect a handsome edifice. This, if true, will 
be pleasant and welcome news to all lovers of gaiety, as the McDowells 
are never ending in their hospitalities, and both General and Mrs. Mc- 
Dowell are never better pleased than when they are surrounded by a 
crowd of happy young people. 

I believe that, after ail, it is not yet a fixed fact that there is to be an 
Author's Carnival this Autumn, although strenuous exertions are being 
made to have it accomplished. Should it take place, Consul Olavonsky, 
with his well-known willingness to help those who need it, has volun- 
teered to drill the Fabbri Singing School, in which he takes bo much in- 
terest, in one of his national dances, and, to make the whole thing per- 
fect, will himself provide the requisite costumes and present them 
to their respective wearers. This, of course, will make the dance one of 
the features of the Fair, rivaling in interest the famous Carnival Guard, 
drilled by Captain Mix for the last one, and which attracted so much ad- 
miration and applause. 

The question at present being much discussed is whether or not we are 
to have a visit next month from President Arthur? Should he come, he 
will no doubt be well received, and as handsomely entertained as his pre- 
ceding Presidential visitors. But, should he elect not to come, I dare say 
California will survive, and look forward with doubled interest to the 
coming of Princess Louise, whose visit promises to be one of the events 
of the year. Felix. 

Dr. R. Beverly Cole has returned from Europe, and resumed practice 
at his new offices, 218 Post street, above Dupont. 



A TAMAT.PAIB HOP. 

July 25, 1882: The other evening, while at a charming dinner party 
at one of the most delightful bonnes in town, I made an engagement with 
my right-hand neighbor at table to gu over to San Rafael for the Satur 
day night hop at the Tamalpais. Ah it was a very pleasant affair and lota 
Of pretty girls there, and last, though not least, as said rfrll all like to see 
themselves inclosed in your rosy covers, I propose to drop you a line- 
just a line— to tell you who were there, or a portion of them at least. 
The day had been gloomy and cold in town, and on leaving the dock it 
was curious to see the muffled figures seeking shelter from the chilling 
wind in the cabin. I say curious, because it savored more of December 
than July. However, by the time we reached San Quentin, although Old 
Sol was hidden behind the fog-bank looming up over Saucetito, the air 
was soft and warm compared with the atmosphere of the Bay. and by the 
time we arrived at San Rafael overcoats were discarded, and lathes to be 
seen in Summery costumes on the hotel verandah, awaiting the arrivals of 
husbanda, brothers, fathers and lovers. The first thing thought of after ex- 
changing salutations was, of course, to get the duBt of travel off, for even 
the short railway trip covers one with that article so prolific in California, 
and after a good wash and carefully made toilet how charming it is to 
descend to the drawing-room and find the dear creatures we adore all 
smiles to greet us. The dinner was excellent You see I place it apres 
les dames, but who does not agree with Owen Meredith in his lines in 
"Lucille," on the subject of dining? and the civilized man finds a chef 
de cuisine at the Tamalpais, and, what is equally important, a well-served 
repast. A very agreeable set of guests were there, for the month, and 
all seemingly pulling well together, as they were chatty and sociable ; 
no cold looks and aristocratic (?) indifference, so noticeable from the snobs 
at some resorts toward a stranger or new arrival. 

But I am forgetting you are waiting to hear of the Hop. Well, after a 
stroll on the balcony, or through the grounds, shy confabs in the corners, 
and the usual preliminary touches to crimps and curls, the crowd of 
pleasure seekers gradually turned to the place where the sound of music 
gave warning of the approaching dance, and what a merry scene it was to 
be sure. Old and young alike seemed to enjoy it. The girls all looked 
11 too lovely for anything," though there were one or two pre-eminent of 
course. Still, even the copy-book of our childhood tells us that "com- 
parisons are odious," so I won't say more of one than another, but let each 
choose for themselves. Among the company were Mr. and Mrs. Schmiedel 
and Miss Mattie, Miss Murphy, Mr. and Mrs. and the Misses Kittle, 
Miss Maynard, Miss Bliss, Mrs. and Miss Findley, Mrs. and Miss Peters, 
the Misses Cutler, and the stationary guests at the HoteL I don't sup- 
pose you care to hear of the men. I heard by the bye that Ric Pinto's 
engagement with Miss Mattie has been broken off. The "wee sma' 
hours " were beginning when we broke up, every one agreeing they had 
spent a most delightful evening. Before I close let me tell you and your 
legion of friends that the ladies of San Rafael intend giving a calico party 
sometime early next month, so get ready your most bewitching cos- 
tumes, girls,_ for there is no fabric more susceptible of making a pretty girl 
utterly irresistible than the same calico in all its various forms and modes. 
I hope I haven't made my " line " too long. If not, perhaps you may 
hear again from Jones. 

" Gentlemen, I want to announce right here," he said, as he stood up 
and laid his hand on the shoulder of the sleeping-car porter," that this 
man is an honest fellow. In my absent-mindedness, a few minutes ago, 
I gave him half a dollar for a quarter. He has returned it to me." 
"Yes, sah — yes, sah," replied the porter, as he ducked his head and 
Bcraped his foot, " yes, sah, kase it's got a hole in it, sah, an' I reckoned 
you was tryin' to beat me outer ten cents. 

Dr. C. C. O'Donnell and Mr. P. J. Kelly are not authorized to re- 
ceive money or transact any other political business for Denis Kearney. 



THE GR EAT I I KI L 

MAMMOTH DISPLAY OF 



THBEE HUNDRED CASES OF 

Men's and Boys' Straw Hats 

TO SELECT FROM. 

Amongst this Spring's Importations are some of the Nobbiest Styles 
of STRAW HATS FOR YOUNG MEN that have ever been offered 
in San Francisco. Strictly One Frioe. 



FLAVIN'S 
GREAT 

Corner of Kearny and Commercial Streets, S. 



X SI jLj 



F. 



PAINE'S HOUSEHOLD ART 

.... AND.... 

BRIC-A-BRAC ROOMS. 

35 GEA.ISY STREET, S. E. 

I have purchased the stock and store lately owned by Mr. C. E. 
Locke, and am enabled to offer the choice collection of Floor and Wall 
Cabinets, Music Stands, Writing Desks, Tables, Easels, Pedestals, Fine 
Potteries, Porcelains, Bric-a-Brac, etc., in all of the NEWEST wares 
and of the CHOICEST designs, at EXCEEDINGLY LOW PRICES. 

6^= Visitors are cordially invited to inspect the Show-rooms, and will be politely 
received, whether intending buyers or not. 
E. PAINE, ----- S5 Geary Street 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER AND 



July 29, 1882. 



THE OLD MANS FUNERAL. 

I saw an aged man upon his bier, 

His hair was thin and white, and on his brow 

A record of the cares of many a year — 

Cares that were ended and forgotten now. 
And there was sadness round, and faces bowed, 

* * * * * * 

Then rose another hoary man, and said, 

In faltering accents, to that weeping train, 
' Why mourn ye that our ancient friend is dead ? 
Ye are not sad to see the gathered grain, 
Nor when their mellow fruit the orchards cast, 
Nor when the yellow woods shake down the ripened mast. 
' Ye sigh not when the sun, his course fulfilled. 
His glorious course, rejoicing earth and sky, 
In the soft evening, when the woods are stilled, 
Sinks where his islands of refreshment He, 
And leaves the smile of his departure, spread 
O'er the warm colored heaven and ruddy mountain head. 
4 Why weep ye then for him, who, having won 
The bound of men's appointed years, at last, 
Life's blessings all enjoyed, life's labors done, 
Serenely to his final rest has passed ; 
While the soft memory of his virtues yet 
Linger like twilight hues, when the bright sun is set ? 
* His youth was innocent ; his riper age 

Marked with some act of goodness every day ; 
And watched by eyes that loved him, calm and sage ; 
Faded his late declining years away. 
Cheerful he gave his being up, and went 
To share the holy rest that waits a life well spent. 
1 And I am glad that he has lived thus long. 

And glad that he has gone to bis reward ; 
Nor can I deem that nature did him wrong, 
Softly to disengage the vital cord. 
When his weak hand grew palsied, and his eye 
Dark with the mists of ag6, it was his time to die.' 

— W. C. Bryant. 

A NOVEL IN A NUTSHELL. 

[ We have lately given space in these columns to sundry " ower true 
tales," constructed from local fact instead of foreign fiction. The idea 
seems to interest our readers, so here is still another of the series:] 

Chap. I. — The Sad "Accident." 
Between five and six months ago there appeared in the daily papers a par- 
agraph to the effect that the wife of a certain prominent citizen had fallen 
accidentally from her bedroom window and broken her neck. Consider- 
ing the avidity with which such items are usually grabbed by the report- 
ers for the dailies, the lethargy of those gentlemen on this occasion was 
difficult to account for. Here was a first-class tragedy, affording abundant 
suggestions for alliterative head-lines and absolutely running over with 
chances for penny-a-line pathos. Yet this golden opportunity was ig- 
nored. In each of the papers a brief paragraph sufficed to chronicle the 
fatal accident, and even this was, in most instances, stowed away in some 
obscure corner of the paper, where only here and there a stray dawdler 
over his morning coffee might chance to light upon it. But the bereaved 
widower was a solid man, and consequently his friends and acquaintances 
were legion, so that since these, of course, were cognizant of the dread- 
ful catastrophe, there was, perhaps, after all no great need of the news- 
papers making an unseemly noise about the unfortunate lady's death. At 
all events this was the philosophical view taken by the afflicted widower. 
His place of business, on Market street, was closed for a day or so, and 
his Stockton street residence was supposed to hide his tears and desola- 
tion for about the same period. Then came five monthB of renewed bach- 
elorhood, and then final consolation in the shape of a second wife, far 
younger and prettier than her unfortunate predecessor. Such is the out- 
line of this romance of real life so far as the general public have hitherto 
known or cared to know. But, as is indispensable to all first-class trage- 
dies, there was a mysterious secret in the background, as will be revealed 
in the following chapter: 

Chap. II.— The Wronged Wife. 

In chronicling this all too truthful history, we have purposely put the 
cart before the horse so far as dates are concerned. We will now go back 
to a period some months previous to the poor lady's violent death. Among 
other valuable parcels of real estate owned by her solid husband was a 
handsome house adjoining that in which he himself resided. This he let 
to a lady — a widow, if we are not mistaken — who had a very pretty 
daughter. It wasonly natural that when landlord and tenant were each such 
close neighbors they should interchange social courtesies. But somehow 
or other the '* courtsies " seemed to be rather one-sided in this case. The 
landlord did nearly all the calling, and in some inexplicable way it always 
happened that his wife was "indisposed" when he paid his visits. It 
likewise so chanced that the fair daughter of his tenant generally had to 
receive him alone, with profuse apologies for the unavoidable absence of 
her devoted mother. But some men are possessed of great patience, and 
recognize, in an extraordinary degree the merit of self-denial. Such a 
man was our solid man of Market street fame. Nobody ever heard him 
complain that his wife could not accompany him on his evening visits, 
though probably, in secret, he wept tears of blood over the deprivation of 
her society; nor was his face overshadowed whh grief when the innocent 
young girl apologized for her mother's absence from the parlor. Doubt- 
less he felt very bad about these things, but never showed it. 

Matters went on smoothly enough in this groove for some time until 
suddenly the solid man's foolish wife got a whim into her pate that her 
liege lord seemed to have rather too much business to transact with his 
tanant through the medium of her youthful daughter. She therefore 
mildly suggested that, rather than be left alone every evening, she would 
accompany her husband on bis visits next door. But, "he wouldn't 
trouble her." " No trouble at all." " She'd only be bored to death by 



dry business details." "O, no; she rather liked that sort of thing.' 
"Well, she'd only be in his way anyhow." Sarcastically, "she had no 
doubt of that." And so the wordy conflict went on and increased in bit- 
terness till Madame found herself locked in her bedrood, listening, with 
face alternately flushed and pallid, to the descending footsteps of him who 
had sworn at the altar to love her and her only, but who, as she now 
well knew, was going straightway to the embrace of another. In that 
moment of supreme mental anguish ; this outraged wife made the dread 
resolve which she afterwards carried out. When her husband returned 
as coolly as if nothing had happened to mar his domestic bliss, she is said 
to have plainly told him that he might send her away, even though it 
were to a lunatic asylum, to a jail, or to her death, but that she would 
surely take her own life rather than thus see her honor soiled beneath her 
very eyea He replied with a sneer that she might please herself about 
taking her own life, but until she became more reasonable he should re- 
peat the discipline he had just inflicted. He kept his word. A tew nights 
later he again locked the unhappy woman in her room, after declaring his 
intention to "drop in next door." She kept her word, too — before he 
reached the side-walk she bad plunged headlong from the window — and 
lay dead with a broken neck, as the Coroner's Jury said, but with a bro- 
ken heart we rather think. 

Chap. III.— A Vert Short One. 
Just five months from that date our solid manufacturer of Market 
street was married to the pure and lovely daughter of his tenant. That 
was only two or three weeks ago, but may we not wonder whether the 
spectre of a slain and outraged woman does not sometimes flit darkly 
across the bright face of their honeymoon ? If so, what will be the in- 
tolerable blackness of the shadow that will enfold their lives in futuie 
years, when the bloom of illicit love has vanished, and the naked horror 
of remorse alone remains! 

ITEMS FROM THE BRITISH TRADE JOURNAL. 

-^ By the discovery of a flaw in the tariff laws of the United States, 
a lawyer named Begly, of New York, will, it is stated, reap a profit of 
several millions of dollars. Woolen materials have for many years paid a 
duty of 50c. per lb., as well as an ad valorem duty of 35 per cent. Mr. 
Begly, however, discovered that the word " wool " in an important para- 
graph in the tariff laws had been omitted, apparently through a clerical 
error. He therefore undertook to bring a test action in the law courts on 
condition of receiving half the sums to be reimbursed to the leading 
American firms in the case of his lawsuit being successful. The Supreme 
Court has at length decided in his favor, and the cute lawyer will share 
a sum variously estimated at from $5,000,000 to 811,000,000. 

— Besides the loss of life and property, which is serious enough, the 
Egyptian muddle has, for the present, brought trade with that country to 
a standstill. The British gross commercial imports from Egypt are, on 
the average, £10,000,000 per annum, and exports thither £3,000,000 to 
£4,000,000. Nearly half this trade is in cotton and cotton goods, and it 
is therefore Lancashire which most keenly feels the stoppage of business. 
Time will have to be granted to merchants with large lock-ups of goods 
in the interior ; but the exact limits of the risk and actual loss incurred 
are, of course, quite undefined at present. 

— According to a return issued by the Norwegian Government, the 
mercantile marine of that nation numbers 8,147 vessels, with a tonnage of 
1,510,700 tons, and employs 59,137 sailors. About 66 per cent, of the ton- 
nage employed in the foreign trade was engaged in carrying the mer- 
chandise of foreign nations, and at only 10s. per ton would earn £2,500,000 
a year for Norwegian seamen, owners and builders. The excess of im- 
ports which Norway has to meet annually has to be paid out of the profits 
of this foreign trade. Americans, after perusing Norway's marine statis- 
tics, may possibly admit that a merchant navy is, after all, of some ad- 
vantage to a nation. 

— — The next canal to be taken in hand after the Panama seems likely 
to be the Malacca canal. The total annual tonnage of the vessels now 
making the de"tour of Malacca is estimated at something near 1,000,000 
tons. The Peninsular and Oriental steamships and the Messageries Mari- 
times make 104 trips a year, and it is estimated that the saving to them 
in coal alone would be £35,000. The saving in insurance, in freight, in 
seamen's wages, and the lessening of risk, would also amount to a large 
sum. 

— ■ Commercial activity in Russia has not been increased by the anti- 
Jewish riots, and business-men are complaining loudly, especially those 
whose trade depends upon the confidence and credit given by commercial 
houses abroad. Even the Moscow Exhibition bids fair to become a fail- 
ure. The number of exhibitors from an empire of 90,000,000 of subjects 
is only counted at about 2,000, and many of these have not yet been able 
to send their goods. 

-— From a return which has been presented to the House of Com- 
mons, it appears that the total quantity of cheese imported into the 
United Kingdom in 1881 was 1.840.090 cwt., valued at £5.245,115. Of 
this, 264,626 cwt., valued at £747,052, came from Holland ; 299,469 cwt., 
valued at £844,646, came from Canada ; 1,244,419 cwt., valued at £3,555,- 
702, from the United States, and the remainder from other countries. 

ENTERPRISE MILL AND BUILDING CO., 

Sawing, Planing- and Manufacturing— Doors, Sashes. Blinds and 

Mouldings— Turning:, Scroll and Jig Sawing— Counters, 

Bar and Store Fixtures. 

Finishing Work for Buildings on Hand and Made to Order. 

217 to 225 Spear St., and 218 to 226 Stewart St., S. F. 

The largest and oldest established mill on the Pacific Coast. 
D. A. AIacoonald, Pres't. R. S. Falconer, Sec'y. W. N. Miller, Supt 
[March 25.] 

WM. H. V. CRONISE, 

iulngr, N.E. corner of Moutgomery and Callfornlastreets, 

No. 29. Office Hours: 11 a.m. to 2 p.m. June 10. 



M 



Take the Autophone to the country, 
the latest airs. 



Ichi Ban, sole agent, has all 



July 29, 1882. 



CALIFORNIA ADVERTISER 



THINE! 

Thine for ever! darling CM : 

Ttiino! thrOOftll tin- stricken strufOsHrtK ye*ra ; 
Thine! though the daxkne** sinks my nun. 

Lost, leva in te.tr*. 

Thine! in thin toilsome, thorn strewn way ; 

Thine! in the tr^n^tont gleams of light 
Thoughts of a long-putt happier day. 

Ere all was ingot 

Thine for ever! love of mine ; 

Thine! though the worldlings curee and rave— 
My heart and soul and body thine 

Until the grave! 

Thine! in a far-off, fairer place ; 

Thine! on a bright and tearless shore, 
Lit with the Hunlight of thy face 



For evermore! 



-World, London. 



ELECTRICITY, ETC. 

^— The ship Gertie Mint, when 174 miles from Matinicus, was struck 
by lightning, which first caught the foretopmast, breaking some three 
feet off it, then ran to the bow, smashing a portion of the stem ; thence 
to the forecastle, where were ten of the crew in different attitudes, some 
sitting and some standing. All alike were rendered instantly insensible, 
but recovered a short time afterwards. The lightning traversed the whole 
of the vessel, eventually returning to the fore part, where it knocked out 
twi>of the vessel's planks in thestem. Fortunately the damage was above 
the water-line. The vessel had a quantity of salt on board, and this was 
removed to right her and prevent her sinking. The flag, which was flying 
on the mainmast, was completely consumed. 

^— During a thunder-storm at Liversedge, Yorks., England, Christ- 
church, in that town, was struck by lightning whilst the congregation 
were singing the "Te Deum." A large stone from the tower was remov- 
ed and the spouting demolished. The building was suddenly tilled with 
flame, and the yaw, which during the darkness had been lit, was blown 
out. A panic ensued, and the congregation (many being children) rushed 
to the doors to escape. Fortunately no one was hurt. 

^— Messrs. Walker's mill at King's Lynn, England, has been lighted 
by the British Electric Light Company with a Gramme machine, and 
sixty-two of their incandescent lights. The same Company has also sup- 
plied a Brockie lamp of 6,000 candle-power in the market-place, which is 
suspended from a davit 47 feet above the street level, throwing a fine light 
over the place and adjoining thoroughfares. 

— — Professor Houston, of Philadelphia, has been investigating the 
subject of underground wires for electric lighting, and he expresses the 
opinion that they are perfectly feasible and safer than over head wires. 
This system is now in use in ban Francisco. 

— ^ A telegraph train is being got ready at Woolwich, for use during 
the hostilities in Egypt. It consists of four telegraph offices, ten wire 
wagons, carrying thirty miles of wire, four air line wagons, and four 
Royal Engineer general service wagons. 

— ■ The first electric railway constructed in Holland was opened a few 
days ago. It is one and a half kilometre long, and runs from the bath at 
Zandvoort near Amsterdam to Kestnerloren, a small park in the neigh- 
borhood. It is on the Siemens and Halske system, and is worked by a 15 
horse-power engine. The gauge is one meter. 

A SUCCESSFUL OPENING. 

The conversazione with which the new offices of the London Daily 
Telegraph were opened was a grand social success. The floral decorations 
and the splendid band of the Royal Artillery were of immense assist- 
ance, and the machinery and music did not interfere with one another. 
The former worked splendidly. There were close upon nine hundred peo- 
ple, and they nearly all went into the machine-room. Plenty of foreign- 
ers of distinction, heaps of society people, including the Duke of Suther- 
land, the Stanhopes, the Rothschilds, Government and Opposition people, 
Lord Otho Fitzgerald, Sir H. Hawkins and some other judges, all mixed 
up with Mr. Christopher Sykes, Captain Oliver Montagu, Lords Henry 
Lennox, Dorchester, Barrington, Suffield and Wrottesley; Abraham Hay- 
ward, Irving, Toole, the Bancrofts, Fairses, the Hon. Harry Tyrwhitt, 
Mr. Henry Calcraft, the Marchese del Grille (formerly Ristori), Madame 
Christine Nilsson ; most of the editors of the morning papers, including 
Mr. Chenery, Sir A. Borthwick, and otherB ; Sir John Cowell, Controller 
of the Queen's Household ; Lord Cork, Dr. W. H. Russell, Mr. Sala ; 
Whips and ex- Whips of both sides, Colonel Taylor, Sir William Hart- 
Dyke, and Rowland Winn ; and military, musical and painting people 
without end. The Prince of Wales took Mrs. Lawson, and the Duke of 
Albany the Lady Mayoress, after supper, and, followed by a big party, 
went through all the mechanical departments — printing-room, foundry 
and engine-house ; and the Royalties did not leave until a late hour — bo 
late that they were able to take away with them copieB of the morning 
papers. There was a biggish crowd in Fleet-street all night ; and at an 
early hour in the morning, when the Prince left, he was lustily cheered. 

— London World. 

London " Truth" says: Politically the Egyptians may be divided in- 
to four classes: 1. Arabi and the officers. They are ready to use the 
name of the Sultan or of liberty in order to attain their own ends, which 
are to acquire place and wealth. 2. The edcated youths of Egypt. These 
young men, with some reason, complain that the officials connected with 
the control were poorly paid, and that in all cases Europeans were pre- 
ferred to Egyptians, and their protests ought to meet with due considera- 
tion. 3. The Bedouins. These Arabs hate the Turks and entirely ignore 
the Sultan. They care very little whether the finances are under Euro- 
pean or Egyptian control, and they are pefectly satisfied with the Khe- 
dive. 4. The Fellahs. These constitute the agricultural inhabitants of 
the Delta and the Nile Valley. Their object is to be allowed to live and 
thrive. They are hard working and patient, and their strongest passion 
is to acq uire money. 

Ichi Ban enlarged ; largest in the world. 



BANKS. 



THE BANK OF CALIFORNIA, SAN FRANCISCO. 

Capital $3,000,000. 

WM. A1YVORD Prenhlcut. 

UlOfl \S IlltOU \. 4 i.sl.lrr | It Ml KKAV, Jr., AWl Ciwlilfr 

Aanrn: 

New York, Agency of the Bank of Calfomia ; Boston, Tremont National Bank , 
Chicago, Union National Bank ; St- LouIh, Boatman's Saving Bank ; New Zetland, 
tho Bank of Now Zvaland. Correspondent In I m. N. M. Roth •■ 

> iiv <A>rre8|>omluiita in India, China, Japan and Australia, the OrlunUl Bank Cor- 
poration. 

The Bank has Agencies at Virginia City, and Correspondents in all the princi- 
pal Mining Districts and Interior Towns of the Pacific Coast. 

Letters of Credit issued, available in all parts of the world. Draw direct on Lon- 
don, Dublin, Paris, Berlin, Bremen, Hamburg, Frankfurt-.. n-thc-Main, Antwerp, 
Amsterdam, St. Petereburgh, Copenhagen, Stockholm, Christiana, Locarno, Mel- 
bourne, Sydney. Auckland, Hongkong. Shanghai, Yokohama. Nov. 4. 

BANK OF BRITISH COLUMBIA. 

Incorporated by Royal Charter.— Capital paid up, 81,800,- 
000, with power to Increase to SlO.oOO.OOO. Southeast corner California and Ban- 
aomc streets. Head Olflee— 23 Corn hill, London. Branches— Portland, Oregon; Vic- 
toria, New Westminster and Cariboo, Briti«h Columbia. 

This Bank transacts a General Banking Business. Accounts opened subject to Check 
and Special Deposits received. Commercial Credits granted available in al parts of 
the world. Approved Bills discounted and advances made on good collateral security. 
Draws direct at current rates upon its Head Office and Branches, and upon its Agents 
as follows : 

New York, Chicago and Canada— Bank of Montreal ; Liverpool— North and South 
Wales Bank ; Scotland —British Linen Company ; Ireland— Bank of Ireland ; Mex- 
ico and South America — London Bauk of Mexico and South America ; China and 
Japan— Chartered Bank of India, Australia and China, and Oriental Bank ; Australia 
and New Zealand— Bank of AuBtralasia, Commercial Banking Company of Sydney, 
English, Scottish and Australian Chartered Bank, and Colonial Bank, Panama. 

May 18. FREDERICK TOWNSEND, Manager. 

FIRST NATIONAL GOLD BANK OF SAN FRANCISCO, CAL. 

Paid up Capital 81*500,000, Gold. President, R. C. Wool- 
worth Vice-President, D. Callaghan ; Cashier, E. D. Morgan. 

Directors :— R. C. Woolworth, D. Callaghan, C. G. Hooker, George A. Low, Peter 
Donahue/Jsaac Wormser, James Phelan, James Moffitt, N. Van Bergen. 

Correspondents— Loudon : Baring Bros. & Co. Bank of Montreal, No. 9 Birchin 
Lane, Lombard street. Dublin : Provincial Bank of Ireland. Hamburg : Hesse, 
Neuman&Co. Paris: Hottinguer& Co. NewYork: National Bank of Commerce. Boa- 
ton : Blackstone National Bank. Chicago : First National Bank. This Bank is pre- 
pared to transact a general Banking business. Deposits in Gold, Silver and Currency 
received subject to check or on special deposit. Exchange for sale on the principal 
cities of the United States, Great Britain, Ireland and the Continent. Commercia 
Credits issued available in Europe, Chii.a and Japan. Collections attended to and 
prompt returns mode at the lowest market rates of Exchange. Jan. 19. 

LONDON AND SAN FRANCISCO BANK, LIMITED. 

Capital, $2,100,000. 

Sun Francisco Office, 424 California street; London Office, 
22 Old Broad street. Portland Branch, Ainsworth's Building. Manager, 
ARTHUR SCRIVENER; Assistant Manager, WILLIAM STEEL. London Bankers, 
Bank of England and London Joint Stock Bank; New York, Drexel, Morgan & 
Co. ; Boston, Third National Bank. This Bank is prepared to transact all kinds 
of General Banking and Exchange Business in London and San Francisco, and 
between said cities and all parts of the world. Oct. 9. 

THE NEVADA BANK OF SAN FRANCISCO. 

Capital Paid Up $3,000,000. 

Eeserve.TJ. S. Bonds 4,000,000. 

Agency at New York, 63 Wall street. 
Agency at Virginia, JTetJ. 

Buys and sella Exchange and Telegraphic Transfers. Issues Commercial and Trav- 
elers' Credits. This Bank has special facilities for dealing in Bullion. Nov. 8. 

THE ANGLO-CALIFORNIAN BANK, LIMITED. 

N.E. Cor. San some and Pine Streets, 

London Office, 3 Angel Court : New York Agents, J. w. Sel- 
igroan & Co., 21 Broad street. Authorized Capital Stock, SG, 000,000. Will re- 
ceive Deposits, open Accounts, make Collections, buy and sell Exchange and Bullion, 
loan Money, and issue Letters of Credit available throughout the world. 

FRED. F. LOW, IGN. STEJNHART, Managers. 
P. N. LibiKKTUAL, Cashier. Sept. 13. 

SECURITY SAVINGS BANK. 

GUARANTEE CAPITAL, 9300,000. 

Officers: Vice-President, Jerome Lincoln; Secretary, W. 
S. Jones; Attorney, Sidney V. Smith. Loans made on Real Estate and other 
Approved Securities. Office : No. 215 Sansome street, San Francisco. Oct. 14. 

THE GERMAN SAVINGS AND LOAN SOCIETY. 

Deutsche Spar nnd Lelhbank, No 536 California street, San 
Francisco. Officers : President, L. GOTTIG. Board of D i recto rb.— Fred. 
Roeding, Chas. Kohler, Edw. Kruse, George H. Eggers, N. Van Bergen, H. L. Simon, 
Peter Spreckels, Ign. Steinhart. Secretary, GEO. LETTE; Attorney, JOHN B. 
JARBOE. _ May 18. 

SELBY SMELTING AND LEAD COMPANY, 

416 Montgomery Street San Francisco. 

Gold and Silver Refinery and Assay Office. 

Highest Prices Paid for Gold, Silver and Lead Ores and Sulphurets. Manufac- 
turers of BLUESTONE. Also, Lead Pipe, Sheet Lead, Shot, etc. This Company 
has the best facilities on the Coast for working GOLD, SILVER and LEAD in their 
various forms. 

June 18. PRENTISS SELBY, Superintendent. 

TO LEASE, 

For a long term—Tot on north side of Townsentl street, 
between Fourth and Fifth, 183 4-12 feet easterly from Fifth. Size 91 8-12 feet 
by 120 feet. Apply to JOHN ROACH, 

April 1. 219 Montgomery street. 



$66 



a week in your own town. Terms and ?5 outfit free. ' 

Address H. Hallett & Co., Portland, Maine. 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER AND 



July 29, 1882. 



"PLEASURE'S WAND." 

• ; We Obey no Wand bnt Pleasure's."— To** Moore. 

Events behind and before the footlights have been very tame and un- 
interesting during the past week, and there is but little to record or com- 
ment upon. Haverley's Mastodons have been playing their third week 
at the California, to fair houses. Their bill has been changed pretty much 
all the way through, but burnt cork minstrelsy is a field which has been 
so thoroughly worked up that little that is new can be looked for in con- 
nection with it. A change of programme, therefore, means nothing more 
than one or two fresh and sometimes pointless witticisms, among an ava- 
lanche of stale ones, a song in which the old words have been shaken into 
new places and a stray bar of fresh music mingled with the old melody, 
and a dance in which the old measure is freshly measured out. With 
these very manifest disadvantages to labor under, the Mastodons did well 
with their new programme, interested and amused their audience and 
sustained their reputation as a very clever troupe. Billy Rice introduced 
a stump speech, which created merriment, and which bore a family re- 
semblance to other burnt cork stump speeches. Leon Bang songs which 
he has not sung during this engagement. Hall did some fresh banjo strum- 
ming, and Carpenter gave a concertina concert. Then the same old clog 
dance that the minstrels which were with Noah, in the ark, danced was 
produced, but it was freshly arranged, powdered and toned up with cos- 
metics until its age was pretty effectually disguised. Pete Mack took one 
of the ends, and he and Billy Rice infused a good deal of life into The 
Broker s Daughter , with which the performance winds up. 

***** 

At the Baldwin those eccentric performers, the Hanlons, have run 
through their second week with Le Voyage en Suisse. As was stated in 
this column last week, there is little in the piece, but there is a great deal 
in the performers and the manner of its presentation. It is not an intel- 
lectual enjoyment. The events which make one's side ache with hearty, 
boisterous laughter are, per se, silly rather than humorous, but the man- 
ner in which they fall out gives to them a funniness that is as broad and 
undeniable as the American continent. 

***** 

On Wednesday night last Charles Wheatleigh took a benefit at the 
Grand Opera House, which was in the nature of a farewell, kiss and good- 
by performance prior to the departure of the beneficiary for the East. 
Considering that the affair was gotten up so hastily and was so poorly 
advertised, it was perfectly marvelous to see Buch a large and fashionable 
audience. Arrah-na-Pogue, with Mr. Wheatleitrh as "Shauu the Post," 
was presented. Historians are somewhat divided in opinion as to whether 
the fathers of the first Spanish mission that ever struck this coast did not 
find Mr. Wheatleigh presenting Boucicault's Irish pieces to the Indians. 
However that may be, there is no doubt but that the venerable Charles 
has rendered Dion's productions a great many times here, and that the 
first rendition took place many years ago. As an actor Mr. Wheatleigh 
is not, perhaps, up to the standard of a star of those good old times when 
every actor was not a star, but he is a thorough and well-schooled actor. 
There is nothing startling or original about him, but there is a quietness 
and finish in his delineations which is peculiarly attractive. His quietness 
is not intensity, nor is his finish a Bhining gloss. His methods are the 
methods of the stage, but he knows how to use them. In his bands they 
are not "stagy." His " Shaun the Post,'' on Wednesday night last, was 
Buch a performance as could be expected from a well-trained actor who 
had played the part so often that he could spell the lines backward. The 
principal point of attraction about it was to see such an old man success- 
fully represent such a young man. Mr. Wheatleigh was acceptably sup- 
ported by the Frohman company. Miss Ada Ward, as " Arrah Meelish," 
did fairly well, and Mr. Charles Norris, as " Michael Feeny," accomplished 
a good deal with a part for which he is not at all suited. None of the 
others call for particular mention. 

* * * * * * 

Locke's Bush-Street Theatre still remains locked, and the chances are 
that the theatrical business will have to brighten very much before any 
one jeopardizes enough coin to unlock it. 

J * ** * * * * 

At the Tivoli Opera House Der Freischutz is still running to first-class 
business. At the Winter Garden <d$olia was replaced with Simona, a 
four-act comic opera, on Thursday evening, which was too late to permit 
of a proper review in this column this week. 

***** 

Madame Rive'-King's farewell matinee piano recital at Piatt's Hall, 
last Saturday, was a pronounced success, artistically and otherwise, not- 
withstanding the fact that a large proportion of our best people are still 
away from the city. Madame Rive'-King's brilliant execution has won 
the admiration of our musical population, and if, when she returns to us 
again, she comes at a more seasonable period of the year, she will un- 
questionably achieve great results financially. 

# # * * * * 

Fred. W. Bert, the new manager of the California Theatre, left New 
York on the 25th inst., to enter upon the duties of his office. He brings 
with him the Union Square Company. Mr. Bert is the originator and 
assisted in building the Grand Opera House, and being an old resident is 
fully alive to the wants of our people in the amusement line. Mr. Mc- 
Connell has made a wise selection in Mr. Bert, and under his manage- 
ment the California will float upon the stream of popularity. 

***** 

Young Lytton Sothern is to make a tour of thiB country next year. 
His notoriety was made a few years ago, when he eloped with his father's 
mistress.-^ Bobby Newcomb 1b now a very badly damaged and 
shattered reminiscence of Bobby Newcomb of ten years ago. " " Geo. H. 
Wood is now as indigestible as an overdose of rich pork pie. Fred. 
Burgess has been re-engaged by the Widow Bedott Company.-— Julian 
Mitchell, Maggie's brother, will be a member of Willie Edouin's Sparks 
next season. — Aimee sails for America next month. -^—Comley, Barton 
and Collier are now in London. They say H. A. D'Arcy is to marry 
Bertha Welby.— ^J. T. Maguire has sold his interest in La Belle Busse. 
——Primrose and West have consolidated their Minstrel Troupe with 
that of Geo. Thatcher, under the title of Thatcher, Primrose & West's 
Consolidated Mammoth Minstrels. They will shortly visit this city.—-— 



Boucicault has canceled all his Fall engagements, and will make his 
first appearance in this country in Boston on New Year's day. -^— Leigh 
Lynch and his musical wife, Anna Berger, are in Cincinnati.— —Jacques 
Kruger has decided to remain with Tony Pastor next season.—— LouiB 
Aldnch has engaged Sedley Brown for his company next season.-^— Wil- 
liam T. Carleton is engaged by the Germania people until September 1st; 
Miss Willey isn't.— J. W. Mack, late of Sheridan and Mack, will star 
next season under Prof. Hermann's management, in An Irish- 
American.^— Raymond will not abandon the stage, although he an- 
nounces himself as "For Congress."—— Mary Anderson will visit Lon- 
don in a few weeks. She will not go professionally, but to study Ristori. 
^— James O'Neil is quite ill in Chicago.^— Frank W. Paul has entered 
into partnership with C. B. Bishop. He will take the management of 
the latter's tour in Strictly .Business.—— J. J. Mackay made an ex- 
cellent impression as the Photographer in Willie Edouin's play of Dreams. 
—The Germania Opera Company, having had too much management, 
is now without any at all^— Mr. and Mrs. Lingard will probably spend 
the balance of the summer at Lake George.^— Ada Boshell, a good 
soubrette, who played Rebecca with M. B. Curtis last season, has been 
engaged to support J. W. Mack in The Irish- American, R. G. Morris' 
new play.— —John Howson has abandoned his idea of starring next 
season.*— Willie Seymour has the unenviable duty of deciding on the 
application for positions at the Madison Square Theatre.— More stars 
than theatres next season.— —Laura Don has completed all engage- 
ments for her company. The list includes Harry Lee, G. M. Holland, 
Lin Harris, Sol Smith, Edwin Cleary, Helen Tracy, Helen Bancroft, 
Henrie Bascom, Mrs. Sol Smith and Ray Alexander. This is a strong 
array of names. — " Bob " Eberle, as he is familiarly known in the pro- 
fession, for the last eight or ten years stage manager of the California and 
Baldwin's theatres, will act in the same capacity for Lawrence Barrett 
this season.— George Learock will be Thos. Keene'B leading man next 
season.^— Sam Rickey and Gus Bruno will have charge of Oscar Wilde's 
business the coming season— three of a kind.— Mme. Gerster presented 
her old teacher, Mme. Marchesi, with a massive silver cup during her 
stay in Paris on her way home to Bologne.' M. Leavitt left London, 
July 19, for Spain, to engage a Spanish ballet troupe.^— A pair of 
jeweled garters sold in New York the other day for $2,000. That's pret- 
ty high. It will take a pretty tall girl to wear garters that come so 
high.— •Harry G. Meade, who was killed by falling from a tight 
rope at Omaha, was professionally known as one of the Foster Brothers. 
^— Ben Stern goes ahead of Old Shipmates this season. Ben is indefati- 
gable, if he isn't handsome. -^E. E. Rice has completed arrangements 
to take the principal people of an Evangeline Company to Australia next 
season.— The much be -photographed Maude Branscomb is exposing her 
talents to the noisy habitues of a small London theatre, called the Ave- 
nue—Genial John Webster and wife (Nellie McHenry) are luxuriating 
at their new and comfortable little cottage, at the Highlands, with Will 
E. Hayden as guest. ^— Laura Don will not begin the season of Alexan- 
dria, Egypt, with her Daughter of the Nile, John Ince to the contrary 
notwithstanding.— —A bust of John McCullough will adorn the front of 
the New Olympic Theatre, St. Louis. He sat for the model last week. 
'Twas at the old Olympic that he made his first substantial success.— 
M. B. Leavitt has signed a contract with M. B. Curtis to play him in 
London with Sam'l of Posen next Summer.*^— Emily Rigl is to play 
Sarah, a Jewess, in .Siberia.— Kutherine Rogers is at Lake Konkon- 
koma, L, L 

Since the Union-street cable line first commenced running it has 
been pressed to its uttermost capacity, on Sundays and other holidays, to 
accommodate the multitude which throngs out toward the Presidio, in 
order to enjoy the fresh sea breezes that are wafted in through the Golden 
Gate. Another attraction is the Seaside Gardens, at which every Wednes- 
day, Saturday and Sunday afternoons the U. S. Presidio Band of twenty- 
four pieces gives a splendid free concert. This popular resort is fitted up 
with everything that can add to the comfort and convenience of the 
guests. Hoodlums are not admitted, and refreshments of the very best 
description can be obtained at reasonable prices. 

The thirteenth masquerade of the Revels Social Club will take place 
at Union Hall, Saturday evening, August 12th. Numerous prizes will 
be offered. 



TIVOLI OPERA HOUSE, 

Eddy street, near Ufarhet.—Krellng' Bros., Proprietors. 
Great Success. Every evening until further notice, Weber's Grand Romantic 
Opera, 

Der Freischutz ! 

or, THE SEVEN CHARMED BULLETS. With the following artists in the cast: 
MISS LOUISE LESTER, MISS LOUISE LEIGHTON, Miss Carrie Godfrey, MR. T. 
W. ECKERT, MR. F. URBAN, Mr.M. Cornell, Mr. Knight, Mr. Niemann, Mr. Evans, 
Mr. Vidal This Evening: Mr. T. W. Eckert as "Max," Miss Louise Leighton as 
"Agathe." July 29. 

WINTER GARDEN, 

Stockton street, between Post and Sntter streets.— Stahl A 
Maach, Proprietors. Every eveniug uotil further notice will be presented 
by the Winter Garden Opera Company, the Comic Romantic Opera in Four Acts, 

Simona ! 

oa, THE INN-KEEPER'S DAUGHTER. MISS ETHEL LYNTON as " Simona." 
The cast of characters will include the following Artists: Miss Annie Ainsworth, 
Miss Annie Lorenzo, Miss Helen Harrington, Mr. Stuart Harold, Mr. Arthur Mess- 
mer, Mr. Harry Rattenberry and Mr. Fred. Bomemann. M'LLE BERTHA will ap- 
pear every evening in conjunction with t he Opera July 29. 

SEASIDE GARDEN! 

Presidio, Terminus of ITulou-street Cable Road. EVERY 
WEDNESDAY, SATURDAY and SUNDAY, GRAND GALA CONCERT by 
the Full United States Presidio Band, of 24 Pieces. Commencing at 12 m. Carl 
Kreyer, Director. Admission, FREE. July 29. 

ROBERT WALKINSHAW, 

REAL, ESTATE AGENT 407 Montgomery Street. 

Farming, Mining and City Property. 

[July 29.] 



July 29, 1882 



CALIFORNIA ADVKKTISKK 



SPORTING ITEMS. 



The attendance At the Olympic Club's athletic sports at the Oakland 
UnmniKi, laH Sat unlay, was fairly pood. That old relic of a barbarous 
age -free admission for ladies -was adopted, and, as a consequence, there 
were hardly any women folks present. The reason for this appears to me 
to be that no gentleman cares to ask a woman other than his wife or sister 
to go to a free show, for fear of diving offense, and a woman of spirit is 
apt to remark, if so asked, "Thank you ; but, really, I have another 
engagement." I judge "f this matter by what happened to myself on a 
former occasion, when I asked a young woman of my acquaintance to ac- 
company me to an athletic meeting. " Ladies are admitted free, are they 
not ?" she asked. I admitted the fact. "No, sir," she replied, " I will 
not go with ynii. I would like to see the races, and I am not, as yet, ut- 
terly weary of your company; hut while I freely absolve you of any sus- 
picion of an attempt to practice economy in your invitations, I do not 
care to be seen at a free show." " But," I argued, " you utterly miscon- 
ceive the character of this meeting. It is about the most ultra aristo- 
cratic out do.. r affair ever given here. I know that many society ladies 
and female notables will be there, and why can't you go?" Her reply 
was: " It may be called false pride, or any of that kind of nonsense, but 
it is nevertheless true that, while the very rich, who are known to be very 
rich, can go where they like and do as they please without exciting com- 
ment, one in an humble rank of life has to be more particular, and I 
choose to draw the line at places where ladies are admitted free." That 
settled it, and ever since then I have looked upon free admission to ladies 
as a mistake that no Club that values popularity can afford to make. 
Some of the racing last Saturday was very good, notably the half-mile 
bicycle race and the final heat in the 100-yards handicap. Some of it was 
very poor, especially the two-mile bicycle race, in which the scratch man 
appeared to give up trying before he had gone half the distance. The of- 
6cers of the day were: Referee, A. S. Barney ; Judges, C. S. Neal, Wil- 
liam C. Gibbs; Starter. Louis McLane, Jr.; Timekeepers, W. R. Melville, 
P. Mclntyre, Dwight Germain ; Clerk of Course, R. T. Stombs. These 
gentlemen performed their duties well, and I am pleased to say that the 
high opinion I formed on a previous occasion of the ability of Louis Mc- 
Lane as a starter was strengthened by the manner in which he handled 
the pistol last Saturday. I was told that in the heat won by R. Haley 
two of the timers made it 10 seconds, and that such a record would have 
been announced but for the third, who caught it as 10}, and insisted that 
even that appeared a trifle fast. In the final heat Haley was beaten in 10 
seconds by less than two vards, which makes his time 10 1-5, and shows 
that his speed at 100 yard's has been somewhat underrated, if the time of 
both heats was taken correctly. I can vouch for it that he did not beat 
the pistol an inch, and that the course measures 100 yards full. In the 
first heat he swerved, lost his stride and had to run from inside to outside 
to pass bis men, which certainly makes his performance better than the 
time actually recorded. In the last heat, which he covered, according to 
the time announced, in 10 1-6, he was slow off the mark. I have no right 
to throw doubt on the time, as I did not hold a watch, and could not find 
any reliable timer, except the officials, who did. If the time was correct, 
and there is no reason to doubt the honesty of the timers, and certainly 
they have had plenty of practice, Haley is the equal ot any amateur on 
the American continent. Whenever Meyers runs the timers appear to 
have 10 seconds glued on their watches, no matter what condition he is in, 
yet there is not a 10 1-5-second professional in America who could not 
give Meyers one yard and a beating, and I believe that Haley on 
Saturday's form could breast the tape at least 6 inches ahead of the 
Manhattan Club sprinter, any time they were both in good 
working trim. The following is a summary of the day's racing: 
Mile bicycle handicap: J. C Quinn, scratch; J. H. Spring, 40 yards; C. 
Burkhalter, 70 yards; W. H. Lowden, 82 yards. Lowden cut out the 
pace and won after a hard race, beating Burkhalter by a few feet, with 
Spring a good third. Time— 3:17£. 100 yards handicap race. First trial 
heat: R. S. Haley, scratch; D. Eiseman, 10 yards; and Arthur Harris, 11 
yards. Haley was rather slow at starting, and had some trouble to get 
through the other men, but be managed to win by a few feet; Harris 
second. Time— 10J seconds. Second trial heat: E. S. Emmons, 6 yards; 
Wm. C. Brown, 7 yards; and J. H. Anderson, 11 yards. Emmons broke 
his shoe at the start, and Brown won, after a hard race, with Anderson 
about two feet behind. Time — 10J seconds. 880-yard bicycle handicap. 
C. L. Leonard, scratch; J. H. Spring, scratch; R. F. Verrinder, 40 yards. 
Spring won by several yards; Leonard second. Time — 1:37. Final heat 
100 yards handicap. W. C. Brown, 7 yards; J. H. Anderson, 11 yards; 
R. Haley, scratch, Arthur Harris, 11 yards. The pace was very hot, and 
Haley, who ran with good judgment, was unable to pass the leaders. 
Harris won, beating Anderson by a yard, with Haley about six incheB 
behind Anderson. Time — 10 seconds. Two-mile handicap bicycle race. 
H. C. Finkler, scratch; G. L. King, 180 yards; C. Burkhalter and W. H. 
Lowden, 310 yards. Burkhalter won easily by several yards, with King 
and Lowden a dead heat for second place. Time— 6:42. 440 yards handi- 
cap race. R. S. Haley, scratch; Wm. C. Brown, 22 yards; D. Eiseman, 
37 yards; Arthur Harris, 40 yards; Harry Germain, 45 yards; and J. H. 
Anderson, 55 yards. All the men except Harry Germain were put back 
a yard for going off their marks before the pistol was fired. Haley stopped 
on the second lap, and Eiseman was also too tired to finish. Anderson 
won by a few inches, Arthur Harris second. Time — 50 seconds. 
***** 

The glove fight on last Monday night, between Owen Judge and Dan 
O'Connell, was won by Judge, in what were popularly supposed to be 
three rounds, but really more were fought, though, owing to the presence 
of seconds in the ring at improper times, illegal handling and seating of 
the men before roundB were finished, and other confusing tactics, it is 
hard to determine the exact number of rounds fought. The referee was 
Charles Rooney. He did well in that he made the men fight, as they were 
willing enough to do, and did not allow small technicalities to interfere 
with the proper conclusion of the match. There was so much noise and 
confusion on the Btage that the timing of rounds was inaccurate all 
through, and neither W. Riley or T. Nolan, the judges, held watches. 
The hall was well tilled, and Hogan, who got up the affair, was well re- 
warded for his enterprise, in a pecuniary sense. I went out of my way 
Beveral weeks ago to aay that I felt sure the match was honest in every 
respect, and that the tight would be a good one. For five yearB past I 



have at different times exported frauds in the pugiliatfa line, and nimplv 
because I have taken the trouble to find out* And have not hesitated, as is 
the wish of the proprlstun of tlii* paper, to tell the truth fully. ThttM 
matches have all turned out an predicted. Of Monday's fight there la but 
little to be said. The daily papers have described the rounds with men 
or less correctness, and as a matter of record the fight was so conducted 
that details are worthier. O'Connell forced the fighting from the start, 
tad had Judge fought to a standstill in the first rmiml. JndfN went down 
without a blow, to save punishment, and the round actually lasted nearer 
five minutes than three. The balance of the mill was all in favor of Judge, 
who got stronger and in better wind, while his opponent got weaker at 
every blow. A heavy knockdown against the iron stake of the ring and 
a swinging right-hander at the back of the ear finished O'Connell, and 
knocked him out of time. His seconds threw up a towel, and the fight 
and $250 was won by Owen Judge. He did not long enjoy his champion- 
ship honors, for immediately at the close of the fight Tom McCormack 
challenged him to fight for $250 or $500 a side and any unclaimed cham- 
pionship that may be around loose. The challenge has not yet been ac- 
cepted. Next week Judge will give exhibitions with Tom Nolan. -^— 
" Tug" Wilson and John Sullivan are matched to fight a ring fight. The 
telegraphed reports of the affair leave the terms very much in doubt. 
****••• 

Last Sunday, at San Bruno, Crittenden Robinson won the California 
Club Medal, with 11 killn, followed by a clean acore in the shoot-off. — 
To-morrow teams from the California and Cosmopolitan Clubs will shoot 
for the diamond challenge medal, at San Bruno. 

***** 

The limit of trotting speed is being rapidly reached. On July 13th, at 
the Gentleman's Driving Association, Morrisania, near New York city. 
Edward and Dick Swiveller trotted double to wagon in the unprecedented 
time of 2:16S- Dick Swiveller is by Walkill Chief, dam by Say re s Henry 
Clay ; record 2:18. Edward is by Fisk's Hambletonian (Masterlode), dam 
by Ohio Backus ; record, 2:19. They are owned by Frank Work, of New 
York, who paid $12,000 for Edward and $15,000 for his mate. The match 
was to rule and for a wager of $1,000, made with Shepherd Knapp. They 
made the quarter in 33£, or a 2:13 gait, the second quarter in 31J, or a 
2:07 gait ; went to the three-quarter pole in 1:40, and finished the mile 
strongly in 2:lb'J. John Murphy, who drove them, offers to het either of 
them can trot a half-mile in one minute, and a mile in 2:08. Their owner 
is willing to make a heavy bet on a half in 1:01. 

***** 

The publishers of the new gentleman's paper, the Breeder and Sports- 
man, have offered a handsome silver cup, typical of the local rowing 
championship, on condition that three or more crews can be found to 
start for the race on Thanksgiving Day next. The terms of the race are 
best and best boats, the cup to be won twice before it becomes the prop- 
erty of any club. The Pioneer Club have already got possession of the 
McKinlay cup, and propose to capture the new trophy if they can. The 
Golden Gates, Ariels and South Ends will doubtless have something to 
aay in the matter. ^— The action of the London Rowing Association to- 
ward the Hillsdale crew stamps its members as a lot of impudent, vulgar 
snobs, who go around loudly protesting that they are amateurs and gen- 
tlemen, well knowing that, like the schoolboy 's picture, they need a label 
to Bhow what they wish themselves to be considered. Their label readB 
gentlemen, but their actions proclaim them blackguards, and cowardly 
ones at that. Criticism at a distance of 6,000 miles may be a waste of 
time, but the News Letter is extensively read in London, and it is just 
as well to let these autocrats of sport and debasers of British honor know 
the contempt in which they are held in this part of the world. It were 
better for every amateur in England to forfeit his amateur standing than 
for this club to lay English athletes open to the deserved imputation of 
cowardice. 

BALDWIN'S THEATRE. 

SECOND WEEK OF THE HANLONS. 

Bring the Children to the Matinee. Saturday Afternoon, 
July 20th, »nd let them enjoy themselves for two hours and a half and be 
KEPT SCREAMING WITH LAUGHTER ! For it is claimed to be the most excruci- 
atingly funny entertainment ever witnessed. Prices for the Matinee will be the same 
as in the evening, EXCEPT FOR CHILDREN. Every night the past week the The- 
atre has been so crowded that 

Ttie Treasurer Stopped Selling Tickets by 8 o'clocle. 
[July 29. J 

PROPOSALS 

Will be received for the purchase or the following aril- 
cles at the STATE JUTE MILL, San Quentin: 
GRAIN SACKS-22x36, 20x36, 24x40. Lots In from 1,000 to 
5,000. 

BEAN BA&S-16X30. 

WOOL BAGS-Standard Weight. 
FLEECE TWINE. 
HOP CLOTH— From 1 ,000 to 5,000 yards. 
Samples of which will be sent when desired, and be on exhibition at the Produc c 
Exchange, San Francisco. 

Proposals will be opened weekly, and tbe award given to the highest bidder. 
Goods to be delivered on the wharf at San Francisco. 

also 

For BRICK Delivered at Wharf, San Quentin. 
Address proposals: J. P. AMES, Warden San Quentin Prison. 

By order of Board State Prison Directors, 
J. V. EI.LI8, Clerk. fjuly 29.] G. W. SCHE LL, President. 

DR. R. BEVERLY COLE 

Has Returned from Europe, 

And Resumed Practice at his New Offices, 

218 POST STREET, above JOupont. [July 29. 



D 



REMOVAL. 

r. E„ II. Pardee has removed from 621 Clay street to 526 

Montgomery, corner Clay. Hours, 10 a.m. to 3 p.m. July 29. 

WILLIAM T. COLEMAN & CO., 

MEMBERS OJP THE PRODUCE EXCHANGE, 
133 and 125 Market Street, 8. F. 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER AND 



July 29, 1882. 



"CLINGING TO THE MAST.' 

[BY CHARLES WEBB.] 



Clinging with their soul's devotion, 

And their eyes declare a dream, 
That the present raging ocean 

Bears them to a gentler stream. 
Ah! devotion and delusion, 

Each so sweet, and yet so sad ; 
Had they better loved seclusion 

Would the end have been as bad ? 
the pathos and the beauty 

Of obedience nobly borne! 



O how like a tidal motion 

Flows the ceaseless throb of care! 
Oft as boist'rous as an ocean, 

Seldom still as evening air. 
And how often things remind us, 

As they flutter on the shore, 
There are sadder hearts behind us, 

Doomed to hear life's ocean roar. 
As we view old Time's divisions — 

Future, present, and the past — 
Straightway flutter o'er us visions, Clinging to the mast of duty, 

Children clinging to the mast. Dead— but not iu heart forlorn. 

— Public Opinion. 

TRICKS OF TRADE. 

It is a painfully notorious fact that we must all devour a peck of dirt 
before we die, but there is no reason that we know of why the task should 
be performed all at once. This has, we fear, been well nigh, if not alto- 
gether, performed by many of us who are afflicted with ton guileless and 
confiding minds — incapable, for instance, of recognizing in "American 
cheddar a compound of skim-milk, enriched with oleomargarine, in 
which, probably enough, the oleomargarine itself has been adulterated by 
melting down hogs and other animals whose exit from life was not suffi- 
ciently sudden and violent to entitle them to the honor of being sold in the 
market. They perform a different kind of function in the hands and in 
the melting-pots of ingenious Americans, making their appearance in next 
to no time as cheese of prime quality. This "imitation factory cheese" 
is a bad imitation of a bad original. Factory cheese is not very nice. 
American cheddar, to our taste, is not very pleasant even when it is the 
exclusive product of the milk of animals, but when it is the product of 
skim-milk, thickened by the fat of animals, and that fat derived, in many 
cases, from Bources which would certainly not pass muster in Smithfield, 
then we begin to fear that "imitation factory cheese " cannot be very 
good, and that the Astute Americans prepare it exclusively for exporta- 
tion. It ii, we should say, frequently strong — decidedly strong. In Swe- 
den cheese of the size, shape and consistency of a brick is often put before 
the traveler. These masses are strong because they have been buried for 
two years underground, but the "imitation factory cheese " is, we fear, 
objectionable either because it is altogether tasteless, or because it is 
strong by reason of its chief constituents not having been buried in the 
ground. Cheese, when good, is very good, but when bad it is atrocious, 
and of late years the enormous demand for it has led to the manufacture 
of "prime Dutch" and other varieties, which are so many libels on a 
once-honored name. It is much the same with butter. There is an im- 
possible amount of " fine Cork," of "fresh Aylesbury " and " Normandy" 
in the market. A vast quantity of it is said to consist of nothing but 
oleomargarine, which in its turn is so much lard or dripping. We have 
grown accustomed to sprats for sardines, to a certain quantity of flour in 
our mustard ; we can even regard with philosophical calm " coffee " made 
of Btones of dates and pips of figs, and we have long since ceased to strug- 
gle against being poisoned by wine merchants ; but to discover that 
America and the Continent alike are manufacturing "butter" and 
" cheese " without the cumbrous assistance of cows and churns, this is a 
development of civilization which is a little uncomfortable. 

Speaking of wine, the spirit merchant is still more to blame than the 
wine vendor. Alcohol, as most people know, can be distilled from a great 
number of products ; among others from grapes. In this form it is known, 
or rather it used to be known, as brandy. A very good kind of Cognac 
used to be produced in France, but the ravages of the phylloxera have 
done away with much of the genuine manufacture. In 1881 only 1,000,000 
gallons was forthcoming, but singularly enough 6,000,000 were exported. 
A well-known firm declared the other day that " £500,000 per annum is 
now being abstracted from British consumers by the French fabricateurs 
in the Cognac and surrounding district, who foist their concoctions on our 
market filtered through the recognized Cognac port." There is, it would 
seem, an approaching "famine in genuine brandy," which can only be 
obtained "through English holders of old stocks." In Paris a bottle of 
really first-rate Cognac costs to the consumer -anything between lOf. and 
25f., and these facts have stimulated the genius, or rather the industry, of 
the adulterators. Potatoes supply the alcohol instead of grapes, just as 
the " clarets " of France are nearly all Italian wines — such as Kiccas oli — 
diluted largely in the first place, and then fortified with spirit produced 
from German potato-fields at Hamburg. All this is not a little unple*s- 
ant. "The good Rhine wine" of to-day*is a chemical preparation of 
which no sober man desires to have "a deep, deep draught." There is 
scarcely anything left unadulterated in the shape of beverages— not even 
beer, cheap as it is. The mania is gradually extending itself over the 
whole of the provision trade, and there really seems no practical way of 
grappling with a great public evil. — From the British Trade Journal. 

Everybody recollects the romantic story of Mdlle. Blanche d'lme"- 
court, who ran away with Mosurus Bey, and after going through a mar- 
riage ceremony with him, and residing for some time under the same roof 
in England with her youthful husband, was enticed away to Paris by the 
Countess, her mother, and immured in a convent. Poor Musurus Bey in 
vain endeavored to gain possession of his bride again. The marriage was 
pronounced illegal, as it had taken place without the consent of the 
young lady's parents ; and Mdlle. Blanche, notwithstanding all her sup- 
plications, could not manage to make her mother relent. At last the lady 
Beems to have forgotten aU her love-passages with Musurus Bey, as she is 
about to be married to Count de Solms, Madame Katazzi's son. — Truth. 



INSURANCE. 



HUTCHINSON & MANN, 

INSURANCE AOENCY. 
No. 382 A- 324 California Street, San Francisco, Cal. 



Fixe Insurance. 



GIRARD of Philadelphia. 

NEW YORK CITY INS. CO of N. Y. 

NEW ORLEANS ASSOCIATION 

PEOPLES of Newark. 

WATERTOWN of New York. 

ST. PAUL of St. Paul. 



TEUTON1 A of New Orleans. 

LA CONFIANCE of Paris. 

DWELLING HOUSE UNDERWRITERS 

ofNewYork. 

THE FIREINS. ASSOCIATION (Limited) 
of London, England. 

Marine Insurance. 

LONDON AND PROVINCIAL MARINE INSURANCE CO of London. 

LA FONCIERE MARINE INSURANCE COMPANY of PariB. 

Capital Represented $27,000,000. 

All Losses Equitably Adjusted and Promptly Paid. 

W. L. CrTAT.WF.BS. 
Special Agent and Adjuster. 

AGGREGATE ASSETS, 

84 0,64X942 . 

Imperial Fire Insurance Co., of London Instituted 1803. 

London Assurance Corporation, of London 

Established by Boyal Charter 1720. 

Northern Assurance Corporation, of London Established 1836. 

Queen Insurance Company, of Liverpool Established 1857. 

A JOINT POLICY ISSUED BY THE FOUR COMPANIES. 

BOB EST DICKSON, Manager. 
W. IiAHE BOOKER, Agent and Attorney. 
S.E. Cor. California and Montgomery Sts. . Safe Deposit Building. 
[October 11. | 

PHIENIX ASSURANCE COMPANY 

Of London, Eng., Estab'd 1782,—Cash Assets, $5,266,372.35. 

BRITISH AMERICA "ASSURANCE COMPANY 

j Of Toronto, Can., Estab'd 1833.— Cash Assets, 81,343,908.54 

WESTERN ASSURANCE COMPANY 

Of Toronto, Can., Estab'd 1851.~Casb Assets, $1,357,326.39. 

BUTLER A HALDAN, 
General Agents for Pacific Coast, 

413 California Street San Francisco. 

[July 10.1 

HOME MUTUAL INSURANCE COMPANY, OF CALIFORNIA. 

Organized 1864. 
Principal Office 406 California Street* S. F. 

FIRE IXMRAXE. 

Capital (Paid TJp in TJ. S. Gold Coin). $300,000.00 

Re -Insurance Reserve $171 ,412 75 



English officials are injuring their intellects in the effort to find out 
why Chinese Gordon should reduce his own salary. The conception of a 
perfectly just man, who considers bis own interests as impartially as he 
considers the interests of other people, is not possible to the official mind. 
Here is a man who has no desire to grab money, no desire to be puffed, no 
desire for anything in the world except to live a noble and gracious life. 
What can the British Official make of such a phenomenon ? The British 
Official simply gasps and makes plaintive inquiries. — " The Chiel" in 
Vanity Fair. 



Assets January 1, 1882 § 684,577.83 I Premiums, since organization. §3,841,412.07 

Surplus for policy holders.. 674,577.83 [ Losses, since organization... 1,756,278.00 

OFFICERS: 

J. F. HOUGHTON President. I CHAS. R. STOKY Secretary. 

J. L.N. SHEPHARD.... Vice-President. | R. H. MAGILL General Agent. 

Directors op the Home Mutual Insurance Co.:— L. L. Baker, H. L. Dodge, J. L. 
N. Shepard, John Currey, J. F. Houghton, W. T. Garratt, C. C. Burr, J. S. Carter, 
Charles Belding, D. W. Earl. April 8. 



PACIFIC DEPARTMENT 

LONDON AND LANCASHIRE FIRE INSURANCE COMPANY 

OF LIVERPOOL. 

Capital $7,500,000 

Cash Assets , 1,709,976 

Cash Assets in United States 775,003 

BALFOUR, GUTHRIE A CO., General Agents, 
March 20. 316 California Street, San Francisco. 

FIRE AND MARINE INSURANCE.--UNION INS. CO. OF S. F. 

The California Lloyds. —Established in 1*61. — Nos. 416 and 
418 California street. Cash Capital, 8750,000 in Gold Coin. Fair Rates ! 
Prompt Settlement of Loses!! Solid Security ! ! DIRECTORS. —J. Mora Moss, 
Moaea Heller, J. O. Eldridge, M. J. O'Connor, R. S. Floyd, Daniel Meyer, Adam 
Grant, A. E. Sabatie, Charles Kohler, E. L. Goldstein, Bartlett Doe, I. Lawrence 
Pool, A. Weill, L Steinhart, N. B. Stone, Wallace Everson, A. B. Phippg, Samuel 
Hort, H. C. Parker, N. G. Kittle, Joseph Brandenstein, W. M. Hoag, Nicholas 
Luning, James Moffltt, John Parrott, J. Baum, M. D. Sweeney, Gustave Touchard, 
George C. Hickox, J. H. Freeman, John Conly, J. H. Baird, Wm. Scholle, Charles 
Baum, J. G. Kittle, Benjamin Brewster, Isaac L. Requa. 

GUSTAVE TOUCHARD, President. N. G. KITTLE, Vice-President. 

Jamrs D. Bailey, Secretary. Geo. T. Bohen, Surveyor. Nov. 6. 

THE SWISS MARINE INS. COMPANIES COMBINED. 

Switzerland, of Zurich. Capital 5,000,000 francs; Helvetia, 
of St. Gall, Capital 10,000,000 francs ; Baloise, of Basle, Capital 5,000,000 francs. 
These three Companies are liable jointly and severally for all losses that may be eus- 
ained. Losses made payable in all the principal seaports of the world. In the set- 
tlement of all claims under an English policy, these Companies will strictly adhere to 
the conditions and customs adopted at Lloyds, and submit to Enjrlish jurisdiction. 
June 9. HARRY W. SYZ, Agent, 225 Sansome St., S. F. 

BRITISH AND FOREIGN MARINE INS. CO. OF LIVERPOOL. 

(Capital 85,000,000.— Agents: Balfour, Guthrie & Co., No. 
/ 316 California Btreet, San Francisco. Nov. 18. 



July 29, 1882 



CALIFORNIA ADVKRTIHEK 



THERE IS NO DEATH. 
There \* DO ile.-Uh! The *t%r* go down 

To shino upon some fairer shore, 
Ami bright Id heaven's jeweled crown 

They nhine for evermore. 
There is no death! The dust we tread 

Shall change beneath the summer showers 
To golden grain, or mellow fruit, 

Or rainbow tinted flowers. 
There is no death! The leaves may fall, 

The flowers may fade and pass away — 
They onlv wait through wintry hours 

The coming of the May. 
There is no death! An angel form 

Walks o'er the earth with silent tread, 
Ho bears our best belov'd away. 

And then we call them "dead.*' 
lie leaves our hearts all desolate, 

He plucks our fairest, sweetest flowers. 
Transplanted into bliss, they now 

Adorn immortal bowers. 
The bird-like voice, whose joyous tones 

Make glad this scene of sin and strife, 
Singa now in everlasting song 

Amid the tree of life. 
And where he sees a smile too bright, 

Or hearts too pure for taint and vice, 
He bears them to that world of light, 

To dwell in Paradise. 
Born in that undying life, 

They leave us but to come again ; 
With joy we welcome them — the same 

.Except in sin and pain. 
And ever near us though unseen, 

The dear immortal spirits tread, 
For all the boundless universe 

Is life — there are no dead. — Lord LyUon. 

LITERARY NOTES. 

— Messrs. A. Williams &. Co., of Boston, have just published an 
eighty-two page brochure on " How the Great Prevailing Winds and 
Ocean Currents are Produced." The little work is produced by Mr. C. 
A. M. Taber, of Wakefield, Mass., a brother of Mr. I. W. Taber, the 
well-known photographer of this city. Mr. Taber's book, although small 
in size, contains a great deal that is valuable. Mr. Taber discusses these 
phenomena in nature in a thorough manner, and expresses and supports 
theories that are materially different from those of other writers on the 
same subject. The little work is apparently the result of a thorough 
study of the subject by a bold, original thinker; who is Dot afraid to 
leave beaten trackB. 

— The Chinese hate long been in the habit of printing " sleeve edi- 
tions "of the classics, to assist candidates at competitive examinations, 
whose memories are not sufficiently retentive. A similar benevolent idea 
has lately induced a native merchant at Shanghai to print a diamond 
edition of the "P'ei wan yun foo," one of the largest lexicons in the lan- 
guage, consisting of 106 books. That it might be small enough to be 
easily hidden in the candidates' sleeves, or plaited in their queues, it was 
necessary to print it in so small a type that the editor announces in his 
advertisement that he will supply a magnifying glass to each purchaser 
to enable him to read it. 

•^— An historic document, long believed to have been lost, has just 
been discovered in the Chateau de Chantereine, Sarthe, in an old clothes- 
press. It consists of a MS. history of some of the Kings of France, with 
frequent marginal notes written by the Dauphin when a prisoner in the 
Temple. The history of the document is curious. It was given to the 
family of Chantereine by the Duchess d'Angouleme, stolen from them in 
a robbery, returned years after as the result of a death-bed confession, 
and then secreted by the late head of the family, so that its very exist- 
ence was forgotten. It has now been placed in the Museum at Mans. 

— Robert Browning has not always been disposed to sit down quietly 
under the charge of obscurity. He wrote thus to a friend in 1868: " I 
can have little doubt that my writing has been in the main too hard for 
many I should have been pleased to communicate with ; but I never de- 
signedly tried to puzzle people, as some of my critics have supposed. On 
the other hand, I never pretended to offer such literature as should be a 
substitute for a cigar or a game of dominoes to an idle man. So, per- 
haps, on the whole, I get my deserts and something over — not a crowd, 
but a few I value more. 

— The promised appearance of Thackeray's suppressed preface to his 
" Irish Sketch Book " is indefinitely postponed, the firm of Smith & El- 
der (London) having claimed to possess exclusive copyright over what- 
ever work, whether printed or in manuscript, was left by that distin- 
guished writer. 

— — Inscribed tablets are to be placed in Paris on the houses where 
Voltaire, Benjamin Constant and Alfred de Musset died, where Madame 
de Sevigne lived, and on the house occupying the site of that in which 
Jean de Meung wrote his share of the "Roman de la Rose." 

' " The Register of the University of California," for 1881-82, has 
just heen issued. It is a concise compilation of information regarding 
the University and the various colleges attached thereto. 

King Champagne, from Reims, Francs.— Private Cuvee in quarts 
and pints. Shield — Krug — in quarts and pints ; Premiere Qualite, in 

Juarts and pints. For sale by Hellmann Bros. & Co., corner Front and 
ackson streets. 



Excellent Shirts made to order, 
wear at Carmany's, 25 Kearny. 



Balbriggan and other fine under- 



INSURANCE. 



The Only Company on the Paclflo Coast Governed by the Mansa- 
chuaotta Non-Forfeiture Law. 

NEW ENGLAND MUTUAL LIFE INSURANCE COMPANY, 

OF BOSTON. 

{INCORPORATED 183X.) 



Aaiets 



. tl6.000.000- 



This Company is Purely Mutual, ami has transacted the business of Life Insurance 
for nearly forty years. All its imlicies arc issued under and governed by the laws 
of Massachusetts, which provide that: 

First— No jKilicv shall become forfeited or void for non-payment of Premium, after 
the payment of TWO Annual Premiums. 

Second— In default of payment of subsequent Premiums, It is binding on the 
Company to issue a Paid-up Policy, as provided for according to the published tables. 

Thu above conditions are available to all Policy-holders, who become such after 
Jan. 1, 18SI, without further negotiation or stipulation or notification on their imrt. 

Whonever, after the payment of TWO Annual Premiums, as aforesaid, the insura- 
ble interest in the life of the insured has terminated, the net value of the policy, sub- 
ject to certain conditions named in said Non-forfeiture Law, Is made a surrender 
value payable in Cash. Distributions of Surplus are made annually on the Contri- 
bution system and are progressive. Liberality and Equity in its relations with Pol- 
icy-holders have always been the governing principles of thie Company, and the con- 
ditions of its Policies in regard to limits of Residence and Travel arc of the most 
liberal description. 

t5T~ Before insuring in any Company, carefully read the Application and Form of 
Policy used by the NEW ENGLAND LIFE. 

HENRY K. FIELD, General Agent. 
Office: 328 Montgomery Street (Safe Deposit Building), San Francisco. 

ENGLISH COKE. 

Best Old Company's Sugar Loaf 

Lump Lehigh Coal. 

Anthracite Egg Coal. 
Cumberland Coal, 
Pig Iron and all 
Steam siiaca. House Coals. 

For Sale in Lots to Suit, at «S~ LOWEST MARKET RATES. 

BLACK DIAMOND COAL 

31'G CO., 

Corner Spear and Folsom Streets. 

JAMES G. STEELE & CO.. 

DRUGGISTS AND CHEMISTS. 

Agents for RICORD'S RESTORATIVE FILLS, 

635 Market Street San Frauclsco, Cal. 

P1LACE HOTEL,. June 24. 

R. CUTLAR, D.D.S., 

Has Removed His Dental Office 

From 716 Clay Street to No. 23 Post Street. 

Office Hours— From 10 A.M. to B r.M. 

[May 6.] 



WILLIAM F. SMITH, 

OCULIST, 



M.O., 



1 formerly at No. ?i:t Bush street, has removed to Phelau'a 
' Building, Booms 300 to 304. Hours for Consultation: 12 M. to 3 P.M. 
Take the Elevator. May 27. 

DR. JAMES W. KEENEY, 

OFFICE AND RESIDENCE: 22 MONTGOMERY STREET. 

HOURS: 2 to 4, 7 to 7:30 p.m. 
SUNDAYS: 3 to 4 p.m. April 9. 

DR. WILLIAM E. TAYLOR. 

OFFICE: 215 GEARY ST. RESIDENCE: THE BALDWIN. 

Feb. 5.] OFFICE HOURS: 1 to 4 P.M. 

PAINTING, TINTING, WHITENING AND PAPER-HANGING. 

Gentlemen about to nave work in this line clone will ben- 
efit themselves by calling at my establishment, examine samples of workman- 
ship, and getting estimates of Cost. Orders sent by telephone (No. 433) from any 
part of the city promptly attended to. E M. GALLAGHER,, 

July 8. 611 Sacramento Street, bet. Montgomery and Kearny. 

TURKISH AND RUSSIAN 

Steam Baths; Electric and Chemical Bt*ths; Sulphur and 
and other medicated vapor baths, with Swedish movements and massage. 
Special apartments for ladies and families. DR. JUSTIN GATES, 

July 1. 722 Montgomery street, near Washington. 

MILLARD F. BRADLEY, 

Searcher of Records, Boom 37, 118 Post st„, San Francisco. 
Office Hours: 5 to 9 P.M. Jan. 28. 



$72 * 



$12 a day at home easily made. Costly Outfit Free. 

Address Tbue £ Oo., Augusta, Maine. 



10 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER AND 



July 29, 1882. 



AN EPISODE OF THE CONKT.TNG-SPKAGPE SCANDAL-- 
EX-SENATOR CONKLING IN A JUSTICES COURT. 

Conkling's great fame as a politician, statesman and oratorical de- 
bater has almost wholly eclipsed bin reputation as a lawyer, and even 
now, when he is said to have resolved to devote himself wholly to bis pro 
fesBion, the class of business which is likely to fall into his hands is one 
in which his experience in the former will probably be more often called 
into requisition than tbe latter. There is much and important legislation, 
as well as litigation, growing out of the vast interests of the great rail- 
road, manufacturing and other corporations, and those of the magnates of 
the moneyed world, and this of a character requiring not only the peculiar 
abilities of one learned in the law, but a special knowledge of men and 
things, and the customs and practices of legislative bodies. In this re- 
spect Senator Conkling is at a great advantage. Early in his career, and 
before he had made his mark as a public man, his reputation at the bar 
was already established, and he stood in the first rank, both as a special 
pleader and advocate. This, united to his vast experience as a Congres- 
sional legislator, must necessarily bring to him a large portion of the 
class of business referred to. Before, through the generosity of Lord 
Roseberry and Jim Keene, the King of the Lobby, Sam Ward, had been 
enabled to acquire a fortune, he was an avowed and professional lobbyist, 
and, as such, great and varied interests were often committed to his 
chargV ; but Sam's abilities were wholly confined to social practices, and, 
these exhausted, he was helpless, finding himself always at a loss for the 
want of that Bpecial knowledge of the law so often required by those seek- 
ing Congressional aid in the shape of special legislation. Evarts at one 
time advised him to devote sufficient time to the study of the law to en- 
able him to get admitted to the bar — not a difficult thing in some States 
—and then establish himself permanently at Washington as a Con- 
gressional lawyer; but this suggestion savored too much of hard 
and dry study to suit the epicurean tastes of Uncle Sam, 
and, happily for him, his bettered fortunes made it unnecessary. 
At the incipiency of the Conkling-Sprague scandal, Mrs. Sprague had, 
soon after the death of the Chief Justice, established herself at "Edge- 
wood," his beautiful residence near Washington, and while there bad 
rented a portion of the premises to one White, who cultivated it as a farm, 
devoted principally to dairy purposes and supplying many of the residents 
of Washington with milk, butter, etc. He was a shrewd, observant fel- 
low, and for that or some other reason soon made himself obnoxious to 
Mrs. Sprague, tbe more so that bis farm-house, one of the outbuildings, 
closely adjoined the mansion itself. Stories were soon in circulation about 
Washington hinting at the gay festivities held at Edgewood, and in this 
connection the name of Senator C. was always prominent. Among 
others, it was said that the master of the mansion, ex-Senator Sprague, 
had arrived unexpectedly one evening by a late train, and on reaching 
Edgewood found the amusements and company of a character so little to 
his taste that, after a stormy interview with the mistress of the mansion, 
he returned at once to Washington, and left by the next train for tbe 
North. These Btories, it was claimed, were traced to White, who, at this 
time, was in arrears for his rent, and on that ground notice was served on 
him to surrender his lease and abandon the premises. This he refused to 
do, claiming that Mrs. S. was indebted to him for supplies, services, etc., 
to an amount exceeding his indebtedness to her. A suit was then brought 
in a Justice's Court to dispossess him, and White, somewhat alarmed, 
offered to surrender if paid the value of his growing crops, but this was 
refused, and the case was brought to trial. 

Up to this time no one had appeared on behalf of the fair plaintiff but 
an agent, and the able attorney of Welsh looked forward to an easy vic- 
tory for his client, but, to the great surprise of all present, when the case 
was called Senator Conkling came into the Court-room and answered 
" ready " on the part of the plaintiff. A jury was summoned and a brief 
statement was made by the Senator. The Court-room was near the City 
Hall, and the news that Senator Conkling had left bis seat in the Senate 
to try a case before a Justice of the Peace soon got abroad, and the room 
was filled with a crowd largely composed of lawyers, among whom were 
not a few Judges. The attorney for the defendant, a by no means des- 

fiicable opponent for the great Senator, feeling that the equities were 
argely on the side of hia client, made a strenuous effort in his behalf, but 
the Senator was on his mettle, and soon satisfied those present that the 
great ability which had years before characterized him at the Bar had 
not deserted him, and making a brief but most plausible and eloquent 
argument, succeeded in winning his case. That evening the Senator 
dined at Edgewood. It need hardly be said that the subject was a 
matter of a good deal of gossip among the Quidnuncs of the Capitol 
City, and a source of still more amusement among the august members of 
the Senate. * - 

GENERAL FREMONT. 
General Fremont lately passed through Arizona on his way to Mexico 
in the interests of some New York capitalists, who possess large mining 
interests there that are only waiting the enlargement of the new railroad 
system of that country for their development. Fremont has been Captain, 
Pathfinder, Provisional Governor, first Republican candidate for the 
highest office in the gift of the American people, Major-General of an 
immense army, and Governor of a Territory which he was almost the first 
to explore. His has been a strange, eventful history, and through it all 
his devoted wife, Jessie — by Lord Northcote pronounced to be the cleverest 
woman he met in America — has been by his side. At one time Fremont 
was worth, according to a statement made by Commodore Garrison to the 
writer, over three-quarters of a million. All this was lost, and subse- 
quently he was compelled to dispose of his beautiful mansion on the Hud- 
son, with its furniture, his pictures, and even his library, which was 
largely composed of choice volumes presented by their different authors. 
One of the General's sons is in the army, and the other in the navy. We 
are glad to learn from a friend, who has long had intimate relations with 
him, that his fortunes are now assured, and that in his old age he will be 
free from all anxiety as far as moneyed resources are concerned. 

The Secretary of War goes with General Sheridan on his trip to the 
Yellowstone Park, and a hunting party is being organized by Senator 
Bayard and Mr. Perry Belmont, to leave as soon as Congress adjourns, to 
join Lieut. Commander Gorringe, U. S. N., who is already there for a six 
weeks' airing in that magnificent region. 



OUR VIEWS OF FOUR YEARS AGO SUSTAINED BY 
THE RESULT. 

The chivalrous and very able defense of J. C. Duncan by David Mc- 
Clure, going through four trials by jury and a term of nearly five years, 
came to a fair and just conclusion on Wednesday. There was a final ac- 
quittal rendered under the instructions of Judge Ferral. For two days 
the prosecution, conducted with ability by the Assistant District Attor- 
ney, Mr. McJunkin, had striven to collect and produce evidence, but 
with no practical result Mr. Casserly was then placed on the witness 
stand, but his mental condition was such that he was excused, and so the 
prosecution ended, to the general satisfaction of all right-minded citizens, 
who have watched this protracted litigation. 

Judge Delos Lake volunteered for the defense, and gave his important 
assistance. No greater compliment could* be accorded to Mr. Duncan. 
Judge Lake addressed tbe Court at tbe close, and stated that, after a full 
and exhaustive examination of the evidence, he had proffered his services 
with a firm belief that no criminal act had been committed by the defend- 
ant, and that he was deserving of his best services to protect him from 
the prejudice and calumny that had pursued him since the unfortunate 
failure of his bank. 

Mr. McClure has won new honors by his unceasing devotion and legal 
research. In every phase of this lengthened strife he has been equal to 
the occasion, and the law firm of McClure & Dwinelle stand forward with 
a prominence that must have a golden reward in the future, though their 
client in this case was a hounded and impoverished man. It is most cred- 
itable to the San Francisco Bar that lawyers of tbe high standing of 
David McClure, A A. Cohen and Judge Lake have, without fee, given 
their valuable time for a long period to aid one who had not a penny in 
his purse. Another feature most deserving of notice is the bail-bond of 
Mr. Duncan, given for $120,000, and having attached to it such well- 
known names as James Phelan, L. L. Robinson, Frank Pixley, A A. 
Cohen, A. G. Abell, J. G. Eastland, Judge Lake and others. The cynic 
may sneer at the heartlessness of wealth, but the warm feelings of these 
gentlemen tell a different story, and no better evidence could be adduced 
of their belief in the entire innocence of the defendant. 



THE SANDWICH ISLANDS. 

Papers from the Islands report the passage by the Legislature of the 
bill introduced by Hon. Lillikalani for a loin of §10,000,000, by a large 
majority. Looking at the prosperous condition of the Islands, and the 
personnel of the present able administration, we see no difficulty in the 
Government meeting the interest of this loan, or even a larger one. 

We observe that an act has beeu passed " to regulate the receipts, 
custody and issue of public moneys, and to provide for the audit of pnblic 
accounts." In our issue of the 24th ultimo we suggested that a quali- 
fied accountant should he selected from one of our banks or insurance 
offices as "Auditor," and we hope the suggestion will be carried out. It 
is of vital consequence to the Government that the gentleman appointed 
to till this important post should be free from any party or clique on the 
Islands, and certainly unconnected in every way with the "missionary 
element." 

The prospectus for a new bank, to be styled the "Bank of Hawaii," 
has been received at Honolulu — the proposed capital §5,000,000— inaugu- 
rated by well-known British capitalists. The local directory is well 
chosen, consisting of Hons. W. M. Gibson, A S. Cleyhorn, I. S. Walker 
and Godfrey Rhodes, with Messrs. Preston and Brown as Solicitors. The 
want of a second bank has been long felt, and we predict for the new insti- 
tution a financial success. 

The crude and laborious articles in the missionary organs leveled at the 
Premier fall flat upon the ears of the public on the coast, and we suppose 
are regarded by Mr. Gibson as less hurtful than the Hawaiian mosquito! 
Even should the treaty be abrogated— which we sincerely hope not — the 
Islands now have a grand future before them, purged of the " missionary 
element," which has hitherto been the bane and curse to their prosperity. 



The recent death at the East of two men— Jonathan Edwards and 
Wm. R. Garrison, both of whom were counted among the New York 
millionaires, and who were in early days conspicuous among the old tim- 
ers here — brings forcibly home to us how rapidly the new generation are 
taking the places of those who were identified with the early history of 
this city. Jonathan Edwards was one of the old firm of Chetwood, Ed- 
wards and Turk, attorneys -at-law. In common with the others, be rap- 
idly acquired a fortune, and, returning to New York, by judicious invest- 
ments it was largely increased. He married a daughter of the famous 
John Jay, and was subsequently, at the suggestion of the Astors, made 
President of the Mutual Security Loan Company, which office he held 
at the time of his death. Wm. R. Garrison was a son of Commodore C. 
K. Garrison, at one time Mayor of this city. *' Billy," as he was fa- 
miliarly called by his friends, was in business here until, with the Com- 
modore, he removed to New York. Though of large and commanding 
stature, and robust health, he was of a singularly affectionate and gentle 
nature, which greatly endeared him to his friends. He married a daugh- 
ter of the once-famous politician and State Prison lessee. General Estell, 
and leaves, besides his widow, several children. He resided at his beauti- 
ful villa near Long Branch, and it was by the recent railroad accident 
near that place that he lost his life. 

At a recent meeting of the " Executive Committee of the Working- 
men's Party," presided over by Kalloch, the members resolved that " un- 
less either the Democrats or Republicans present us with a platform on 
which we can stand, we shall give the W. P. C. a separate ticket," etc. 
We had fondly believed that the W. P. C. was an abomination of the 
dead and buried past, but if it Btill squirms, rather than see its members 
slighted we would ourselves present them with " a platform on which 
they could stand "—till the trap fell Both Kalloch and Kearney have 
already come near being presented with such an one. 

Wells, Fargo & Co.— We notice the semi-annual statement of the 
officers of Wells, Fargo & Co.'s Bank to the Bank Commissioners, show- 
ing a desirable condition of its affairs. Deposits held, $1,919,595.18 ; 
total resources, §4,536,549.11. This bank is among the leading banks of 
California, and entitled to the confidence of the community. 



July 29, 1882. 



CALIFORNIA ADVEKTISKK. 



11 



THE TOWN CRIER. 

* h war i no Ortol" "What <h« -l«i»il art ihoo f " 
"Ham thai will play liio diml.air wuh yon." 

* ttinn in him tail aa ioor aa ■ flail, 
Whicb mad* him itrow bolder and bold«r." 

He was uear sixty and rich. She was just twenty ami poor. His 
attention* became marked. Her younger and poorer attendants were 
givon tin- thalta He ceiled ufteiier and ^-t ;t ><*i later. Hi- was uiray and 

had stiff joints, and liis breath was not sweet. But his collaterals were 
bulky. He had a big deposit in one of the banks, and his corner lota 
wen when- the ottj i* growing. Time went on, and she waa as patient as 
she oonld be. Vet she longed for some spoken word to which she mold 
catch on aome token of regard aa an earnest of more to follow. At teat, 
when her patience was at its last ebb. and she was pining for a sight of 
Gun's ulster or a smell of Will's cigarettes, he spoke: ** To-morrow 
night," quoth the old man, as well as his celluloid gums would let him. 
" I shall bring you the first gage of my affections. Promise me you will 
care for it." " You're too real sweet," was all she could murmur, as he 
hobbled down the steps. But dreams of diamond solitaire ear rings, gold 
bangles, ruby lockets and pearl necklaces danced through her brain all 
night, and kept her heart beating with expectant happiness all next day. 
Would night never come? Yes, at last it came. But it brought not the 
old man. Instead came a District Telegraph messenger with a note and 
a parcel— a long, wide and flat parcel, tied up in white paper. A jewel 
case, of course. Nothing short of a bracelet set or a chain and locket. 
Controlling her impatienco, sho opened the note first. "I am too diffi- 
dent," it ran, "to be present when you open the offering I send, but shall 
call to-morrow to hear what you think of it." " Old darling," she said, 
running over to the glass to be ready to see how she would look with the 
things on. Then with trembling fingers she tore the paper from the par- 
cel. But what was this ? Ah! With a stifled scream she sinks into a 
chair, while from her hands on to the floor falls a cloth-bound book with 
title, " Loxe is Enough." At last accounts she was seated in the parlor, 
all traces of her emotion banished, calmly awaiting the old man's ring. 
But Fred and Gus and Charley and Will and Ed were with her, and they 
were all chuckling together, to think of the " firing out " they were going 
to give the old man when he arrived. 

The mater-familiases of our Bociety have been sadly discouraged at 
the retrospect of the field matrimonial of the past season. Still the 
daughters remain to grace the home circle. Sweet creatures ! they are so 
lovely and so dear. Strange that, although so eagerly sought for as part- 
ners in the german, there is a decided backwardness visible in being asked 
as partners for life. Now, why is this thus? Good, anxious matrons, we 
will tell yon. Coin is at the bottom of it all. The young men of society 
who haunt ball-rooms, make party calls, walk home from church, the 
theatre, etc., are mostly an impecunious lot, who hang on from day to 
day, eking out their salary — going beyond it, often — hoping to catch an 
heiress. No girl without a dot need hope for " keeps." Look at the ar- 
ray of fashionable weddings that have taken place of late. In any one 
instance has the girl been of "poor but honest parents?" There is where 
the trouble lies. Now, just one word of advice — good, sound counsel you 
will find it — from T.C. Let the girls seek to shine at home, as well as in 
the whirl of fashionable life. Let them seek for the approbation and ad- 
miration of the solid men, or the rising, industrious young man — who, al- 
though not able to provide toilets from the White House, may be more 
likely to prove kind care-takers of their future lives than the careless 
man of fashion. What wonder that men hesitate to embark on the sea of 
matrimony when they mark the almost boundless extravagance of the 
present-day young ladies, who every one knows are not wealthy, vie with 
those who are possessed of millions ? Some one must suffer. Either the 
poor mothers and younger children are forced to pinch, and turn and 
twist — often, indeed, go without a new dress for a whole year, that the 
eldest girl may have one for each entertainment; or else dressmakers' bills 
stare the poor, overworked father in the face. In case there is no father, 
the widowed mother is loaded with debt. This is no overdrawn picture. 
Society in our midst has many and many such a case, and yet the cry is: 
" Why don't the men propose ? " 

She had just returned from Paris, and was in a Market-street furni- 
ture store, getting some furniture for the new house her husband had 
built for her on the other side of Nob Hill during her absence. She had 
ordered four buffets, two eta/jeres, half a dozen fauteuiles and one lit. She 
had seen these names in a Parisian auctioneer's catalogue, but didn't, of 
course, know what they meant. But that didn't matter. She thought 
they must be something nice if they had them in Paris. The orders 
rather cumflusticated the furniture man, who knew about as much French 
as an Omnibus Railroad hill-horse. But, as the lady didn't ask to look 
at the things (aa had been her custom when shopping in " Yarrup"), and 
said she would trust to his taste, he wrote the names down with a know- 
ing flourish that made up for the originality of the spelling. "Anything 
else, Madam ?" he asked, as his customer seemed about to depart. " O 
yes, let me see," she replied, consulting her gold-bound ivory tablets: " I 
want & bidet." The man looked surprised, then amused. "Naturally, 
madam," he said, grinning, " but do you think one will be enough in such 
a large house as yours?" The lady looked alarmed. Had she made a 
mistake? thought she. If so, it would never do to show her ignorance. 
11 Well, then, just as you like," she said, "suppose you send up a dozen; 
I guess that will do." " No doubt it will, madam," said the man, enjoy- 
ing the supposed joke hugely, but I'm sorry we can't supply you. You 
will find all the Biddies you may need at the Intelligence Office over the 
way," and he laughed loudly as the'lady turned and flounced out of the 
store without a word. By next morning's post, however, came a note 
countermanding the orders, and the furniture dealer has made up his 
mind either to learn French or quit joking with his customers. 

We notice with peculiar satisfaction that Dr. M. A. A. Wolff, a 
quack whom it has been the News Letter's duty to expose on several 
occasions, was tried in Department No. 11 of the Superior Court, on 
Wednesday last, for having produced an abortion on the body of Mrs. 
Benedicta Swenson, whereby she lost her life. The jury found the 
accused guilty of manslaughter, and it is encouraging to think that at 
least one of the charlatans who prey upon society in the guise of doctors 
will find his way behind the prison bars, where he belongs. 



Out at Woodward's Gardens they have a habit of tranaf curing the 
animals from one oage to another without remorliuj their door-platoa, 
' '»'« ooi o complications, and i* In no wise conducive to an ae- 

ciirato knowledge of natural history. "What is it, mamma?" inquin* 
the small boy as he gazes on a mangy laughing hyena, "Why, don't 
you know, Johnny, that it's a grizzly Dear?' replies the fond parent, read- 
ing the placard in front of the cage. " So that's a royal Bengal 1 1 
it?' says Mrs. TimotheusSuliw.il to her husband, who has brought her 
from the rural districts for the honeymoon. " Well, so the card says," 
he answers, doubtfully, "but it looks mighty like one o' them cussed ooyotea 
bbout our ranch, Eli/.a Jane." " For the land's sake!" exclaims another, 
gazing in rapture at an imprisoned guinea-pig, "I've often heern tell of 
prairie-dogs, but that's the first I ever seen," and so on ad infinitum. It 
may be fun for the listeners, but there isn't anything very instructive for 
the crowd when a dog-faced baboon is labeled as a boa-constrictor; an 
alligator as bird of paradise; a domestic hog as a " happy family "; a 
solitary kangaroo as a " cinnamon bear, peccary, green moukey, sloth, 
and esquimaux dog." Then there are rock-cod called sharks, crabs called 
sea anemones, etc. The birds, beasts and fishes ought to enter a joint 
suit for libel. If justice were done them the damages would be some- 
thing fearful to contemplate. 

■Whoever has made the trip overland from the East in the same Pull- 
man car with a fresh specimen of the British tourist, will appreciate the 
following incident that occurred a short time since: It was the luck of a 
Forty-niner who had beeu to Vermont to see the old folks, and who was 
starting upon his return to 'Frisco by the New York Central, to have as 
possessor of the other half of his section a young man whose curfless 
wrists, the redness of whose neck, the shimmer of whose polished fore- 
head and the length of whose feet left no doubt as to his nationality. 
About an hour out from New York the train made its first stop. "Aw, 
what place is this?" anxiously inquired the young man. The Forty-niner 
consulted Ms guide and told him it was Tarrytown. "Aw, thanks." 
Twenty minutes later the train stopped again. "Aw, what place is this?" 
"Peekskill," the Forty-niner told him, none too sweetly, as he roused 
from a half doze. Thus it went on at every station the train stopped at, 
till the Forty-niner thought he'd had about enough of it, and called the 
porter to make up his bed. "Now, my friend, said he to the young 
man, as he prepared to draw off his boots, " you just tell the porter where 
you want to get off, and he'll tell you when we get to it." " Aw, thanks, 
thanks," was the reply. "I want to get out at Cheyenne, and go on to 
Denver, don't you know." 

When the last night-car on the Sutter street cable-road is bowling 
down hill with its grips loose, it is by no means an easy matter for the 
would-be^ passenger to bring it to a halt. The driver and conductor are 
both anxious to get home, and this fact somehow renders both of them 
absolutely deaf to all ordinary entreaties for a ride. But we saw a lady 
capture them the other night after an original fashion of her own. She 
loomed up out of the fog in a light-colored dolman, deliberately walked 
into the centre of the track, and there in pensive attitude awaited the 
down-rushing car. The driver's hair fairly lifted his hat off his head, 
and his sudden application of the brake made his passengers think they 
had collided with an earthquake. Then the fair fog-ghost stretched out 
a daintily gloved hand to the forward rail, stepped languidly on to the 
front of the dummy, and away we went again. Verb. Sap. 

The much persecuted Captain Roper, of the A-njer Head, has found 
a trifle of balm in Gilead after all. A California jury has received his 
grateful thanks (tendered in open court) for justifying him in kicking the 
Mongolian interpreter of the Custom House off the deck of his ship. It 
appears that the wily Mongol sought to bribe the Captain in the matter 
of releasing certain Celestial houris, who were detained on board the 
steamer. Possibly the Captain was, as he claims, incorruptible ; or it may 
be that the price offered was deemed inadequate for the ransom of a float- 
ing harem. At all events the skipper somewhat abruptly introduced his 
bootmaker to the Chinaman's tailor— et hinc ilia lachrymce. Since the 
verdict plainly accuses the interpreter of perjury and attempted bribery, 
it will be interesting to note how that official fares with the Federal 
authorities. 

Arizona teamsters are not, as a rule, regular readers of the Bible, so 
we must suppose that it was a natural instinct for retributive justice, and 
not a knowledge of the law respecting an eye for an eye, etc., which re- 
cently induced several of these gentlemen to first disable an Apache with 
a bullet, then carefully scalp him, and finally roast him alive over a slow 
fire. Such methods of treating prisoners are not to be commended, but 
it must be remembered that the culinary feat aforesaid was performed 
after the baked Indian and his friends had slipped up in an attempt to 
surprise the teamsters. The surprise party, however, was all on the other 
side ; and as for the Apache practical joker, it only remains to be said 
that the slang phrase " done brown " exactly fits his case, both metaphori- 
cally and literally. 

Surely, there never was a community where so many madames abound, 
whose husbands are invisible, as San Francisco. Are they widows, di- 
vorced, separated or uncongenial ? asks the inquiring visitor. Each and 
all, responds the "oldest inhabitant." Arizona has become the recepta- 
cle for these embodied spirits, who, though lost to sight, are, alas! but 
too earthy, for some there are who yet retain enough following of Bible 
doctrines to believe in St. Paul's plain teaching on the divorce question, 
and, therefore, wear their bonds, however galling, although the husband is 
invisible. 

Mr. Pickering is about to publish a companion volume to that most 
interesting book of his, "California as It Was, or, a Quarter of a Century 
Ago." The new work will be a collection of orations, now published for 
the first time in his own name. Though originally delivered on the Sand- 
lot by Mr. Denis Kearney, or, as Mr. Pickering jocosely calls him, "my 
alter ego, or my other eye." The master mind of Loring can be discovered 
in every line. 

Our ingenious friend, High Tie Jollygopher, has just completed a 
condensing machine for making the feet small. In order to experiment- 
ally demonstrate the efficacy of the machine, as there are very few people 
with large feet in California, he at once departs for Chicago. 

Future givers of "Commerce" parties should either change the name 
of their entertainments or have the sale of Webster's Dictionary enjoined. 



12 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER AND 



July 29, 1882. 



SUNBEAMS. 



Mrs. Mc Coble, an Austin lady, rebuked her 
colored cook, Matilda Snowball, in the following 
wordB: " When I hired you you Baid you didn't 
have any male friends, and now I find a man in 
the kitchen half the time." "Lor bress your 
soul, he ain't no male friend of mine." "Who 
is he, then ?" " He am only my husband.'' 

In a speech at the Birmingham Press Club 
dinner, Mr. G. A. Sala is reported as saying that 
he did not see why journalists should not meet 
in Congress to discuss what he believed to be an 
imperial point. Probably imperial pint is what 
he really said. 

"I don't know how it is," said Jack Dumb- 
thump, " everybody is forever quoting that 
'ignorance is bliss,' and yet I am not happy." 
" That's because you've just got enough sense bo 
know what a fool you are," commiseratingly re- 
plied a sarcastic neighbor, 

" How to treat babies during the summer," is 
the subject of a long article in a Western paper. 
To ask them up to take a drink is absurd, and 
other treatment is recommended. 

At Alton, HI, a preacher asked all Sunday 
school children to stand up who intend to visit 
the wicked, soul- destroying circus. All but a 
lame girl stood up. 

There is a hog in Georgia that drinks beer. 
Long hair and a suit of shiny clothes is all it 
wants to become a socialist, and claim to be a 
working man. 

A fuddled New Yorker skinned his nose on 
a barber pole and said : '"Scuseme!" He thought 
that he had fallen against a pair of striped stock- 
ings. 

Sunday School Teacher: "When father and 
mother abandon you who then will take you in?" 
Bright Pupil: "The perleece, sir." 

Some traits run in families. Shakespeare's fa- 
ther, being illiterate, made his remark. So did 
Shakespeare. 




BROAD GAUGE. 

SUMMER ARRANGEMENT. 

Commencing Monday. April 10* 1882, 
And until further notice, Passeuger Trains will leave 
from, and arrive at San Francisco Passenger Depot 
(Townsend st., between 3d and -Jthstreets,) as follows: 



DESTINATION. 



8:30 A.M. 
+ 9:30 A M. 
10:40 a.m. 

* 3:30 F M. 
4:25 p.m. 

* 6:16 p.m. 
6:30 p.m. 



...San .Mateo, Redwood,. 
and Menlo Park 



-8:30 a.m 

10:40 a.n 

f 3:30 p.m. 

4:25 p.m. 



. Santa Clara, San Joseaud 
..Principal Way Stations 



"J 



10:40 a.m.I 
* 8:30 p.m I 



Gilroy, Paj.ro, Castroville 1010:0 
and Salinas (\ 6:0 




..Hoi lister and Tres Pinos. 



(" ...Monterey. Watson ville . \ u 1Q< 
< Camp Goodall, Aptos, Camp „[ 
(San Jose.Soquel, Santa Cruz. ) ! 



10:40 A.M. . . .Soledad and Way Stations . 



•Sundays excepted. tSundays only. 

Sc;~ Special Notice. :-& 
Sunday Excursion" Trains to Monterey and Santa 
Criz.— First-class Excursion Train to Monterey and 
Santa Cruz will leave San Francisco every Sunday at 
7:30 a.m. Returning, leave Monterej at 4:35 p.m.; San- 
ta Cruz at 4:15 p.m., arriving San Francisco at 8:40 p.m. 
Fare for the Round Trip to either point, $3. 

Stage connections are made with the 10:40 a.m. 
Train, except Pescadero Stages via San Mateo, which 
connect with S:30 a. m Train. 

Ticket Okficks— Passenger Depot, Townsend street, 
and No. 2 New Montgomery street. Palace Hotel. 
A. C. BASSETT, H. R. JUDAH, 

Superintendent Asst. Pass. & Tkt. Agt. 

83?"" S. P. Atlantic Express Train via Los Angeles, 
Yuma, etc., leaves San Francisco daily via Oakland 
Ferry, foot of Market street, at 9:30 am. 



C. P. R . R. 

Time Schedule, Monday, May 15, 1882. 

Trains leave, and are due ta arrive at, 

Sa n Fra nciaco as follows: 



L (fo*r) E } DESTINATION. 



| ARRIVE 

\ (from) 



9:30 a.m. 
*4:00p.m. 
•4:30 p.m.!. 

8:00 A.M.j. 

3:30 p.m. I. 
-4:30 pm. . 

8:00 a.m.:. 
♦4:00 p.m.'. 

9:30 A.M.;. 

4:30 p. M.I. 

8:00 a.m . 
•4:00 P.M.!. 

8:00 a.m . 
*4:30p.m 
18:00 a.m 

9:30 a.m 

8:00 A m 

5:00 p.m 

9:30 a.m. . 
*4:00 p.m. . 

8:00 a.m.,. 

8:00 a.m... 
10:00 a.m.I 

3:00 p.m. 

5:00 p.m. . 

3:30 p.m [ . 

5:30 p. m. i . 

8:00 A.M.|. 

8:00 A.M.|. 

8:00 a.m. j. 

3:30 p.m. . 



. . . Antioch and Martinez.. 



. . . Calistoga and Napa 

. t Deuiing, El Paso > Express. . 

. \ and East )" Emigrant 

. | Gait and 1 via Livenuore... . 
. 1 Stockton | via Martinez .... 

...lone 

... Knight's Landing 

" " ({Sundays only) 

. . . Los Angeles aud South 

. . Livermore and Pleasantun 

. . . Madera and Fresno 

. . . Marysville and Chico 

. ..Nilesand Havwards 



<'4:30 p.m. 
*4:00p.m, 

8:00 a.m 

3:00 p.m. 

8:00 a.M- 

0:30 a.m. 

3:30 p.m. 
*4:00p.m. 
H:30 p.m. 

3:30 p.m. 

8:00 a.m. 
*4:30 p.m. 
*o:00 a.m. 



I Ogden and I Express 

\ liast . . f Emigrant ...... 

..Redding and Red Bluff 

(Sacramento, I via Livermore 

■j Colfax and - via Benicia 

( Alta J via Benicia 

..Sacramento, via Benicia 

. .Sacramento River Steamers.. 

..San Jose 



. ..Vallejo.. 



({Sundays only) . 



..Virginia City. 
..Woodland 



. Willows and Williams. . . . 



2:40 p.m. 
* 12:40 P.M. 
♦10:10 A.M. 

7:40 P.M. 
11:40 a.m. 
*10:10 a.m. 
*10:10 A.m. 

7:40 p.m. 

2:40 p.m. 

7:10 a.m. 

5:40 P.M. 
♦12:40 P.M. 

5:40 P.M. 
$10.10 A-M. 
{11:40 a.m. 

2:40 P.M. 

5:40 P.M. 

H:40 A.M. 

2:40 P.M. 
•12:40 P.M. 

5:40 P.M. 

5:40 p.M. 

4:10 P.M. 

9:40 A.M. 

S:40 A.M. 
11:40 a.m. 

6:10 a.m. 

5:40 p.m. 

5:40 p.m. 

7:40 p.m. 

11:40 A.M. 

•10:10 a.m. 

•6:00 A.M. 

4:10 p.m. 

9:40a.M. 

7:10 P.M 

2:40 p.m. 
{11:40 a.m. 
•12.40 p.m. 
•10:10 A.M. 
11:40 a.m. 
•7:40 P.M. 
*L0:10 A.M. 
•7:40 P.M. 



Train leaving San Francisco at 9:30 a.m. should meet 
Pacific Express from " Ogden " at San Pablo ; also Pacific 
Express from "El Paso" at Antioch. 

LOCAL FERRY TRAINS, 
Via Oakland Pier. 



From "SAN FRAITCISCO," Dally. 

To EAST OAKLAND-«6.00. '6:30. 7:30, 8:30, 9:30, 

10:30, 11:30, 12.30, 1.30, 2:30, 3:30, 4:30, 5:30, 0:30, 

7:00, 8:00, 9:30, 11:00, '12:00. 
To ALAMEDA— »6:00, "(6:30, 7:00, «t7:30, 3:00, *t8:30, 

9:00, 't9:30, 10:00, 11:00, 12:00, 1:00, 2:00. 3:00. "t3:30, 

4:00, «t4:30, 5:00, <-t5:30, 6:00, »t«:30, 7:00, »8:00, 9:30, 

11:00, »12:00. 
To BERKELEY — «8:00, »6:30, 7:00. '7:30, 8:00, "8:30, 

9:00, (9:30, 10:00, 110:30, 11:00, 111:30, 12:00, 1:00. 

2:00, 3:00, 4:00, 4:30, 5:00, 5:30, 6:00, 6:30, 7:00, 8:00, 

9:30, »1!:00. 
To WEST BERKELEY— '6:00, «6:30, 7:00, *7:30, t8:00> 

■8:30, 9:00, 10:00. 11:00. 2:00, 3:00, 4:00, *4:30, 5:00. 

•5:30, 6:00. "6:30, 7:00. 

To " SAN FRANCISCO." Dally. 



From BROADWAY. OiliLAXD-»5:32, *6:02, 6:32. 

7:32,8:02,8:32,9:02,9:32,10:02,10:32,11:02,11:32, 

12:32, 1:02, 1:32, 2:02, 2:32, 3:02, 3:32, 4:02, 4:32 

5:32, 6:02, 6:32, 7:02, 8:02, 9:32, 11:02. 
Fkom EAST OAKLAND -'5:21, «5:61, 6:21,6:51 

8:5l, 9:51, 10:51, 11:51, 12:51, 1:61, 2:51, 3:51, 

5:51, 6:51, 7:51, 9:21, 10:51. 
Fro* ALAMEDA— *5:15, '5:45, 6:15, 7:10, *t7:35, 

*t3:35, 9:10, »t9:35, 10:10, <*H0:35, 11:10, 12:10, 

2:10,3:10,4:10,^4:35, 5:10, «t5:35, 6:10, «to:35, 

<t7:35, 9:15, 10:45. 
From BERKELEY— »5:45, »G:15, 0:45, "7:15,7:45, 

8:45, [9:15, 9:46, 110:15, 10:45, 111:15, 11:45, 

1:45, 2:45, 3:45, 4:15, 4:45, 5:15, 5:45,6:15, 6:45, 

9:15, *10:45. 
From WEST BERKELEY — «5:45, «6:15, 6:45, 

7:45, 8:45, 9:45, 10:45, 1:45, 2:45, 3:45, 4:45, »6:15, 

•6:15, 6:45, «7:15. 



7:02, 
12:02, 
5:02, 

, 7:51. 
4:51, 

8:10, 

1.10. 
7:15, 

•8:15, 
12:45, 
7:45, 

•7:15, 
5:45, 



Creeli Route. 

From SAN FRANCISCO— »7:15, 9:15, 11:15, 1:15, 3:15, 

6:16. 
From OAKLAND— «6:15, 8:15, 10:15, 12:15, 2:15, 4:15. 

All trains run daily, except when star (*) denotes Sun- 
days excepted. 

tTrains marked thos (t) ran via East Oakland. 
(?)Sundays only. 



" Standard Time" furnished by Randolph & Co., Jew- 
elers, 101 and 103 Montgomery St., S. F. 

T. H. GOODMAN, Gen. Pass, and Ticket Agt. 
A. N. Towne, General Manager. 

L.H.Newton. M. Newton. 

NEWTON BROTHERS & CO., 

Importers aud Wholesale Dealers In 
Teas, Foreign Goods and Groceries, 204 and 206 
California street, San Francisco, Cal May 25. 




On ami after Monday, April 3d, 1SS3, 
Boats and Trains will leave San Francisco as 
follows: 



7 1 f\ a.m. daily (Sundays excepted), via San Rafael, 
•Av from Market-street wharf, for Petaluma, San- 
ta Rosa, Healdsburg, Clovcrdale, Guerneville and way 
stations. Stages connect at Geyserville for Skaggs' 
Springs; and at Cloverdale for Highlaud Springs, Kel- 
seyville, Soda Bay, Lakeport, Ukiah and Geysers. 



Daily, Except Sundays. 

2Qh p.m., via Donahue, from Washington-street 

4FZ A r.M., via San Rafael, from Market-street wharf, 
•vU f or Petaluma, Cloverdale and way stations. 
Stages for Navarro Ridge and Mendocino City leove 
Cloverdale daily at 6 A.M. ^_^___^____^_ 



8.20 



Sunday Excursions. 

A.M., Sundays only, via Donahue, from Wash- 



ington-street wharf, for Cloverdale and way 
stations. Round Trip Tickets on Sundays to Petaluma, 
$1.50; Santa Rosa, S3; Healdsburg. $3: Cloverdale, 
$4.50; Guerneville, S3. Returning, will arrive in San 
Francisco at 6:45 p.m. 



S~l /t a.m., Sundays only, via San Rafael, from Mar- 
*i-0 ket-street wharf, for Miller's, Pache^o, Novate 
and BurdeU's. Returning, will arrive in San Francisco 
at 7:45 P.M. 



GEYSERS! GEYSERS! 

The Greatest Natural Wonder of the 

World I 

Immense Reduction in Hates. 

Round Trip Tickets, via Cloverdale $3 50 

Round Trip Tickets, via Cloverdale and Calistoga. $12 50 



Passengers will leave San Francisco at 7:10 a.m. 
week days, from San t^uentin Ferry, and arrive at the 
Geysers at 2:30 p m. On Sundays, leave Washington- 
street Wharf, by Steamer JAMhS M. DONAHUE, at 
8:20 a.m. Returning, arrive in San Francisco by either 
route the following evening. 



PETER J. McGLYNN, 
Gen. Pass & Tkt. Agt. 



ARTHUR HUGHES, 
Gen. Manager. 



SONOMA VALLEY RAILROAD. 



O" 



and after Monday, April 3d, 1882, 

Boats aud Trains will leave San Francisco .as 



2 Of) p. m. daily (Sundays excepted), from Washing- 
«OV/ ton-street Wharf, for the town of Sonoma. 
Fare, SI. Round Trip Tickets, from Saturday till Mon- 
day, $1 50. 

SUNDAY EXCURSIONS. 

8 0A a.m. (Sundays only), from Washington-street 
.£i\J wharf, for the town of Sonoma Round Trip 
Tickets, SI. 



ARTHUR HUGHES, 
Gen. Manager. 



PETER J. McGLYNN, 
Gen. Pass. & Tkt. Agt. 



H. S. Williams. A. Ohesebrough. 

"W. H. Dimond. 

WILLIAMS, DIMOND & CO., 

Shipping and Commission Merchants, 

UNION BUILDING, 
Junction Market and Fine Streets. 

AGENTS FOR 

Pacific Mail Steamship Company, Pacific 
Steam Navigation Company, The Ca- 
nard Royal Mf"l Steamship Company, 
* ' The California Line of Clippers * * 
from New York and Boston, 
and ** The Hawaiian Line." 
San Francisco, January 81, 1880. [Jan. 31. 



There is some talk of building a new jail at 
Belton to prevent leading citizens from lynching 
prisoners. Perhaps the safest plan would be to 
put the leading citizens into the new jail. 



Don Cameron: " My dear Hubbell, what is 
the trouble?" Jay A. Hubbell: "Reform's got 
the grain and left us the stubble." Both:-" Alas! 
for the fate of our bright Stalwart bubble." 



July 2!>, 1«83. 



CALIFORNIA ADVERTISER. 



13 




"The World, 

l By , 



the Flesh, and the Devil. 

Truthful Penman. 1 



One hundred thousand people are going to meet ;it the Crystal 
I'aliwo tooftlebnta Mr. Gladstones Parliamentary Jubilee. Mr. lir«*,-k 
will bav« i splendid chaiue of displaying genius. Mr. Gladstone^ 
achievement* can hardly be put on canvas. They cannot be recorded in 
immortal marble, and brmize i.s equally out of the question. But Mr. 
Brock can make a picture in fireworks of the great man's life, ami no 
artistic medium can possibly be better. The fifty years that are to be 
celebrated resemble nothing so much as an interminable squib. A suc- 
cession of bangs and fizzles, then silence and an unpleasing smell that 
is a fair simile for the fifty beueficent sessions that our natioual idol h8s 
lived through.— Van ity Fair. —The rice-millers of Valencia are 
alarmed at a reoent shipment of 100 bags of cleaned rice, from Hamburg 
to Madrid, via Valencia. The rice has to pay a duty of 84 cents per ewt., 
besides the freight and heavy railway charges, and yet it id cheaper than 
the Spanish mills could sell it.— —The North China Herald mentions a 
novelty in the way of applied science, which is said to exist among thieves 
in China, They prepare a composition of some medicated ingredient — 
■opposed to be aconite — and, lighting it, blow it into the room to be rob- 
bed, by means of a tube through a hole previously made— not a difficult 
thing in Chinese houses with paper windows and doors. The inmates are 
thus anestheticized, or at least deprived of the power of speech and loco- 
motion, and the thieves enter and do their work. In vain does the pro- 
prietor being robbed see the burglars. He cannot move limb or tongue. 
It is said that water absorbs this poison, and so for this purpose it is not 
uncommon for wealthy people to sleep with a basin of water at their 
heads. It is called men hsiartg, or hsiun fisiang, to suffocate or asphyxiate 
with incense.— Six thousand soldiers were to be discharged from the 
Indian army on the 1st of July, according to the new regulations. The 
men seem pleased at the idea of regaining their liberty, while, on the 
other hand, young recruits are plentiful who are anxious to lose it.— 
Court Journal.^— New York steamship agents report that the demand 
continues unabated for cabin passages to Europe. They expect that 30,- 
000 tourists will sail this season, against 22,000 last season. ^— A corre- 
spondent of Nature, writing in reference to Professor Riley's question as 
to the utilization of ants in horticulture by the Chinese, states that an at- 
tempt was made to introduce them into Ceylon to check the ravages of 
the coffee bug, but the red ants sometimes attacked the naked limbs of 
the Malay coolies so fiercely that the experiment was given up.^— 
Beer-brewing has (a Japanese.paper says) become an important branch 
of industry in that country. The two largest establishments are the 
Shimidzuya Shokwai and Hakkosha breweries. The beer brewed there 
is excellent in taste, and far more wholesome than imported beer. Its 
sale is increasing, and it will probably vie with the imported article.^— 
A movement, supported by several eminent scientific and distinguished 

Persons, including the Archbishops of Canterbury and York, the German, 
talian and French Ambassadors, Mr. Tennyson, and many others, has 
been set on foot in England for the purpose of providing some suitable 
and enduring monument to Charles Darwin. The proposal is to erect a 
statue in some public place, and to provide an endowment to be applied 
in furtherance of biological science. — Forty American army cadets 
are going to Germany under the escort of General Sherman. They in- 
tend to study the system of the Imperial army, and find out how battles 
are won. — Court Journal.'^— 'The greatest smoker in Germany must 
certainly be PriDce Charles, the Emperor William's brother, who con- 
sumes daily from 18 to 24 strong Havanas. A cigar-holder has just been 
made for the Prince, the American Register tells us, by which he can 
smoke three cigars at a time. Enemies of the fragrant weed, however, 
cannot allege that this inveterate habit has injured the Prince's health, 
for, in spite of his 81 years, Prince Charles is strong and active, is de- 
voted to hunting, works hard at his military duties, and wears no specta- 
cles.^— The Bishop of Peterborough cannot help saying good things 
both in and out of the pulpit — especially out of it. The other night a 
rich, benevolent, but somewhat brainless millionaire was boasting after 
dinner that he gave away £2,000 to the poor regularly every year. He 
said : " I think it is right, you know ; a sort of duty in my position, I 
can't say what becomes of it, but it's given away in charity ; that's all I 
know and that's all I care about. £2,000 every year." " What," said 
the Bishop, " do you really mean to say you pay away £2,000 to the poor 
every year as a religious duty? " " I assure you, my lord, that is so, ' re- 
plied the wealthy man, with complacency. " Well," said the witty Bishop, 
"that's the largest insurance against fire I ever heard of."— —Wooden 
shoes are worn in the Western States of America, and enough of them 
are sold to keep a large manufactory going. They are cut out of green 
basswood, smoked and dried like hams and sold at 35 cents a pair.— 
The wealth still within reach in the Chihuahua mines, Mexico, is stated 
to be practically fabulous, and only requires capital and competent assist- 
ance to get the precious metal out. The companies already at work are 
controlled by Americans or Englishmen, though in most instances Mexi- 
cans are associated with them. ^— It is stated that in the Beason of 
1881-82 more than 3,000.000 trees were planted in the United Kingdom, 
out of which number Scotland claims about 2,000,000, England 600,000, 
Ireland 300,000 and Wales 40,000.— Court Journal— An entirely new 
experiment in diplomatic politics is about to be made. The Republic of 
Costa Kica has determined to accredit a woman, instead of a man, as its 
Ambassador— or rather, Ambassadress— to the United States Govern- 
ment. The arrival of Madame Beatrice, the lady selected for this influ- 
ential office, is expected with no little curiosity in Washington.— —Judge 
Tourgee says the live man is always to be found in front. In funeral 
processions, down here in Texas, we have noticed that the remains were 
in front, and the live men came straggling along behind. — Texas Siftinqs. 



COAL AND WOOD, 

Wholesale and Retail, 

At the Old Number 209 Sansomo Street. 

GEORGE H. HUNT & CO. 

t£- Any Artioie In the Line Supplied. ff» 

M » rch *• Telephone No. S3 1. 



ROEDERER CHAMPAGNE! 

NOTJVE. 
The Trnde null the Public are Informed Ihnl we Receive the 

GENUINE 

LOUIS ROEDERER CARTE BLANCHE CHAMPAGNE, 

Direct from Mr. Louis Roederer. Reims, 
Over his Signature and Consular Invoice. 

&S~ Each caso is marked upon the side, "Macondray & Co , San Fran- 
cisco," and each bottle bears the label, ** Macondray & Co. , Sole Agents 
for the Pacific Coast." 



Sole 



MACONDRAY & CO., 

Agents for the Pacific Coast. 

[September 24.] 



M. A. GUNST & CO., 

203 Kearny Street Sail Francisco. 

IMPORTERS AND DEALERS IN 

HAVANA AND KEY WEST CIGARS, 

Also, Agents for Kimball, Gaulliener & Co.'s Guatemala Cigars. 
K^" Inform the Public that they receive large invoices of Choice 
Havana Brands twice a month. I Fob. 19, 

G. AD0LPHE LOW & CO., 

Commission Merchants, 
SAX FMAJfCXSCO and ....NEW YOJRK. 

g3T* Agents of American Sugar Refinery, corner of Union and Battery streets, 
San Francisco, California. j an# 17. 

Olaus Spreckels, Wm, G-. Irwin, 

WM. G. IRWIN & CO., 

Sugar Factors and Commission Agents, 

Honolulu, H. I. rMarch 25. 

J. 0. SPRECKELS & BROS., 

Shippin and Commission Merchants. 

Hawaiian Line of Packets. 
325 Market Street San Francisco. 

May 28 , 

CALIFORNIA SUGAR REFINERY, 

Manufacturers or the Standard Syrup, a superior article 
put up in barrels expressly for home consumption. Also, Extra Heavy Syrup 
in barrels for Export. Refined Sugars at lowest market rates. Office 3-25 Market 
street, up stairs Dec. 21. 

J. W. Sheehy. J. 0. O'Connor. 

O'CONNOR & SHEEHY, 

Undertakers, 

Removed to 767 Mission utreet, between Third ami Fourth. 
Every requisite for Funerals furnished at the Lowest Rates and in the Best 
Manner. April 29. 

GEORGE C. HICK0X & CO., 

STOCK BROKERS, 

No. 314 Pine Street San Francisco. 

[May 20.] 

ALASKA COMMERCIAL COMPANY, 

No. 310 Sansome Street, 

Sam Frakcisco, 
WHOLESALE DEALERS IN EVBS. 

[September 21.1 

JOSEPH GILLOTT'S STEEL PENS. 

Gold Medal, Paris, 1878. 
Clold by all Stationers. Sole Agent for the United States: 



MR. HRNRY HOE, al John street, N Y. 



Jan. 5. 




C. W. M. SMITH, 

The .Leading and Oldest Patent Solicitor, 

Established in 1862, 

Removed to 224 Sausome Street. 

^£* MR. G. W. M. SMITH is the patent attorney for Marriott's Aeroplane Com- 
part for Navigating the Air. Oct. 22. 

TABER, HARKER & CO., 

IJUPOSIEBS AND WHOLESALE QMOCERS, 
108 and 110 California St., S. F. 

[April 19.] 



14 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER AND 



July 29, 1882. 



LOCAL NOTES. 

Board of Education "fires" a female teacher for getting married. 
Board believes in the Oneida doctrine.— Superior Court decides that it 
will not allow outsiders to resuscitate Burke's blackmail bonanza suits. 
^—Sharon and H. M. Levy organize a temporary debating society at the 
Palace. Subject: "The recent meeting of stockholders in the Savage 
mine." Discussion very savage ; policeman shows Mr. Levy the place of 
egress.^— Mrs. Connolly says Lawyer Crittenden swindled her; but no 
one will believe that of a lawyer.— 'Park Commissioner Alvord resigns, 
and Leland Stanford is appointed in his place. Good man goes out and 
a good man goes in. ^—British S. S. Malabar libeled for carrying too 
many Celestial seekers for the Golden Fleece to this port.-^— Schetzel, 
the original Sunday law enforcer, breaks a saloon-keeper'3 window. Police 
Judge will have a chance to break Mr. Schetzel's heart with a fine. 
H. Windel and Fannie C. Kedon wash their dirty linen in Justice Clough's 
Court. Whew!— Judge Freelon gives Thomas Foy, a hoodlum, ten 
years in the Penitentiary for helping his sister and wife (?) to rob a sailor. 
Bully for you, Judge!-^— Mrs. Floyd, mother of Maggie Floyd, a pupil in 
the JRincon Grammar School, couldn't understand why her daughter 
should have her card marked "excellent" and "good," and yet be denied 
credit for those marks. The educational authorities help the mother's 
understanding by suspending the pupil.^— Golden Gate Woolen Mills 
try to burn up and fail.-^— Hoodlum pays a Market-street bar-tender for 
two glasses of beer with one bullet. Settlement unsatisfactory. — Man 
dies from a rupture of the spleen. IE some of our prominent citizens 
were to rupture their spleen the peninsula would be inundated. ■■— 
Nephew of Pocahontas discovered on Minna street by a Chronicle reporter. 
Strange to say, he is only 93 years of age instead of 250. - " Seaman's 
Protective Association depose the notorious Rooney from the Presidency, 
and ask him to turn over the books and the money. Roouey says he will 
do so as soon as he can find the S. P. A.— ^Deidrick Hoffman sues the 
City R. R. Co. for 850,000, value of a right leg. At that rate Mr. Hoff- 
man must be worth several hundred thousand dollars. Republican 
clubs effect permanent organization all over the city — with one exception. 
That one indulged in a free fight.— Denis Toohey alludes to " our friend, 
Arabi Bey," at a meeting of the Land League. The bond of friendship 
lies in the fact that both talk "big," keep out of danger, and encourage 
assassination and outrage. — The Immigration Association induces 
twenty-six persons who have wandered into the State to settle down. 
Big showing for eight months' work.— Boxing match. Leading citizens 
all present at this intellectual entertainment. ^—Chinamen have a good 
time with a wooden idol. The Irishman's idol is contained in a bottle. 
^—Stockholders in the defunct Merchants' Exchange Bank meet and 
call each other liars for five consecutive hours. Mr. Burton, the new 
Superintendent of the Mint, gives John Brown's daughter a position. 
"And his soul goes marching on."— ^Court-martial on an N. G. C. 
Very martial. N. G. C. got drunk at Santa Cruz. Police Court matter. 
^— Jury says Roper did right in kicking Pac Kwai's sitting-down place. 
—■Female grabs Chinaman burglar. Chinaman don't like it. Female 
undressed.^— Escambia proves to be broken up. Thousands go out of 
sight. Wrecking company not yet millionaires, but willing to be. ■ D. 
J. Toohey, an alleged lawyer, forces ex-Seuator Eugene Casserly, by pro- 
cess of Court, upon the stand when he is ill and incapable of testifying. 



PACIFIC COAST AND EASTERN NOTES. 
The Nicaragua Canal Swindle bill favorably reported. Of course. 
Lots of money in it.^— Man named Newell charges that the passage of 
the Texas-Pacific Land Graut bill was facilitated with coin — but he got 
none of it. The last clause in the complaint is the most important.— 
Big explosion of petroleum in New Jersey. State blown into New York, 
but the rebound brought it back.— Murderer hung in Brooklyn. Make 
a mark on the wall. The event won't be repeated this century.— Firm 
of New York lard refiners fail. Lard deliver us !— Woman horsewhips 
a San Jose man, who possesses two names and a slanderous tongue.^— • 
Salt Lake man thrown out of his waggon and killed. Fourteen discon- 
solate widows. What anguish !^— San Bernardino boy, while "doing 
something " with a Winchester rifle (of the accidental pattern) makes an 
angel out of his grandfather. Grand son, that !^— Corner stone of the 
Old Ladies' home at Temescal, laid by David McClure, for Perkins, C. 
N. Fox and many other ladies. 'Big meeting of miners in Nevada 
City. "Resolved" about aquarter of a mile long, adopted, but that don't 
stop the debris.— —Big fire hreaks out in Merced, but it didn't burn. 
Cool, courageous man spat upon it and saved S30,000 worth of property. 
^—Stockton pioneer dies. Those Stockton pioneers will do that kind of 
thing every once in a while, but they never do it more than once.-^— 
Woodland boy goes out shooting. Good day's sport. Comes home with 
one arm. ^—Somebody says President Barrios, of Guatemala, is a ques- 
tionable character, and Arthur immediately invites him to dinner.^— 
Attorney-General Brewster decides that a Congressman is not an officer 
of the United States. He is merely a private, and therefore entitled to 
blackmail the Civil servauts. But why call his position an " office ?"^— 
Congress removes the tax from playing cards. Lika the poka. Fanny 
Louisa Buckingham bucks against completing a New York engagement, 
unless the coin is placed insight. Instead of exclaiming " Bring forth 
the fiery, untamed steed," she softly whispers, " Produce the sp#ndulix." 
—Two Texans tight a "jewel," and the Coroner rakes in one fee. The 
young lady is looking for another bean to her string.^— Big wheat crop 
in Minnesota.— Lightning express on the Boston and Providence road 
upsets. Nobody hurt, everybody scared. Curious accident.— Shippard 
says he isn't that kind of a girl, in a pamphlet of 184 pages; but then 
Shippard is such a monumental liar it doesn't matter much what he says. 
—Dr. Baxter refuses to allow Dr. Crane, appointed Surgeon-General of 
the Army, to be confirmed. That's the kind of a Baxter he is.— Big 
fire in Fresno. Fifty houses roll heavenward in suooke.^— Man Bhoots 
his neighbor, near Mariposa. Neighborly trouble over the boundary 
line. Bullet establishes the true line, if the pistol shoots straight. 
•^— Young man tries to blow his brains out in Truckee. No 
brains to blow, but he kills himself all the same.— Riot in a 
Santa Cruz dive. The policeman, the Mayor, the horse and several other 
officials unable to quell the disturbance. ^—Salinas man lies down to take 
a nap on the railroad track. Railroad train distributes one of his feet. 
— —Big harvest of wheat and fruit in Sonoma.— The "fire fiend" 
reaches Healdsburg and cremates a small wooden building.— —-United 
States Attorney-General decides that Chinamen cannot land in Eastern 



ports for the purpose of crossing the continent en route home. —-Chinese 
Embassador returns to Washington. Rats and chickens will he in de- 
mand. —Vigilance Committee in Seattle give some twenty bad charac- 
ters notice to leave. Bad characters leave.— —Farm-hand accidentally 
killed near Petaluma.— 'Two more of the Escambia's crew turn up near 
Point San Pedro. The fishes don't see* to be hungry. ^— One of the ac- 
cidental pistols goes off at Tombstone. Another tombstone.— Murdered 
man's heart, pickled in alcohol, produced in a Stockton Court. A dis- 
gusting and uncalled-for exhibition. —The loss of the Jeannette is to be 
inquired into by a Naval Board. Will this bring back the dead ?— The 
President will put none but "Stalwarts" on guard.^— Four thousand 
applications for 800 places in the Pension Office. Everybody wants a 
place under Uncle Sam. The ladies sigh for 'em and the babies cry for 
'em.— — Nebraska man shoots his wife. Startling resemblance between 
Nebraska man and other blackguards.-^— Deadwood man fights with an- 
other Deadwood man. One Deadwood man shot, the other disemboweled. 
Two Deadwood dead men.— Two F. F. V.s fight a duel for " honah." 
Nobody hurt — "honah" happy. — An Illinois banker levants. Leaves 
the bank behind, but there is nothing in it. - — The editor of a Kansas 
paper falls into a river, and the river swallows up that sweet morseL You 
bet. " The hoarse cry of " fire! " is heard in Nevada City. It always is 
when there is a blaze. Two children burned up.-^— Red Bluff also in- 
dulges in a red fire. — A boy tries to steal a ride on a freight car bumper 
from Stockton to San Francisco. There isn't so much of him as there 
was when he started. Valuing his anatomy on the Hoffman scale, he 
paid §150,000 for the ride, and will probably lose bis life into the bargain. 
—Skeleton found near Grass Valley. Unknown, but, if perfect, the 
doctors will buy it all the same.— Epizootic in Stockton, and still the 
people ain't happy — especially those of them that own horses.^— Block 
of buildings burned (in Portland ; at the same time they were burned 
down. -^Stockton jury tries a murderer. Four of them are hard- 
hearted, blood-thirsty idiots, who want to convict the poor fellow.—^ 
President buys a four-in-hand, and pays for it — which is more than the 
last stalwart President used to do.^— Man lynched in Indiana. Served 
him right. Helped a murderer to get away. —Arizona teamsters cap- 
ture an Apache and roast him. Fizz! Smells bad.^— Mysterious bur- 
glars at work in Stockton. Vigilance Committee would notify suspicious 
characters to leave, only the town would be depopulated.— ^The Board 
of Equalization reduces assessments on hydraulic mines at Nevada City. 
That's more than the Boards of Directors will ever do. — -Bakersfield 
family poisoned by eating brawn. Served them right— ought to have 
eaten bran.— Big explosion of giant powder in Chicago. Felt all over 
the city. Even the ladies felt it in their feet.— -Rivers and Harbors bill 
in danger of a veto. Veto will hurt the bill, but not the people. 

FOREIGN NOTES. 

A Deluge of Rain falls in Bohemia and destroys great portion of the 
crop. S. F. Bohemian Club (of dry goods clerks) all right.— Bradlaugh 
and others arrested in England for publishing " blasphemous libels." In 
other words, for offending the dogmas of religious fanaticism. ■ Egyptian 
notables depose the Khedive and call him a traitor. Khedive will prob- 
ably cut their heads off when it comes his "Sunday out."— ^Massacres 
reported all over Egypt.-^— Sir Garnet Woolsey appointed to command 
the Egyptian expedition.^— British Government begins to take more 
vigorous war measures, i When his tail is pulled there is lots of vigor in the 
old lion yet— "Arrangements for the coronation of the Czar are being 
pushed forward "—by the Nihilists as well as the loyal party.-^— The 
arrears bill passed to a third reading in the House of Commons. Peers get 
ready to mutilate it. -^—Municipal government of Marseilles ask the ex- 
empress Eugenia to give back a chateau which they presented her with 
when she exercised more influence than she does now. The dog returns 
to its vomit and yet it is a cleaner animal than this municipal govern- 
ment. ^— Arabi's forces skirmish with the British and then run away. 
" He who fights and runs away," etc. ^—Frightful accounts of Egyptian 
atrocities. Oh that Dennis Toohey was amongst his " friends." Would'nt 
they stop his supply of oxygen immediately if not sooner?^— Parnell's 
brother asks the Orangemen to reap his crop. Kind of " Happy Family " 
ain't it?^— American minister to Italy (who held office for 21 years) lets 
go.— «The silent reaper came after him and being a tenant for life he 
couldn't hold over.— i?£ Jo-way, a Constantinople journal, states that 
the Porte hopes that the Egyptian question will be settled without re- 
course to force. That is, jaw away, if you like.— France determines to 
assist the British in protecting the Suez Canal. — One of the Phcenix 
Park murderers arrests himself at Puerto Cabello, Ven. Wants a free pas- 
sage back to Ireland.— Deverish Pasha states that after the bombard- 
ment of Alexandria the British pillaged and burned the town. For a 
Turk, Deverish makes a very good fibber.^— Weather improves in Ire- 
land, and the potatoes commence growing right out of the ground.^— 
Catholic Archbishop denounces a French paper published in New York, 
Paper's turn next.— Local election in British Columbia. Veto of the 
Chinese Bill cuts no figure in it.— Arabi Pasha still fighting with his 
mouth. -^— De Lesseps gets mad ; tells the French Consul that Port Said 
is his property, and that he (the Consul) is a fool.-^The Sultan proposes 
to denounce Arabi Pasha as a traitor—next Spring, when the strawberries 
come into market.-^— A non-suited litigant shoots at a Dublin Judge. 
Bad shot. 

COOS BAY COAL. 

The Cleanest and Cheapest- 
No Soot! No Dirt! 

The Best Coal for Domestic Use ! 

. All Coal Dealers Keep It! 

[May 27.] 

DANCING ACADEMY, 

IN RED MEN'S BUILDING, 
No. 320 Post Street Opposite Union Square. 



PROF, O. A. LUNT respectfully announces that his new Academy, No. 320 Post 
street, is now open for Juvenile aud Evening Classes. Office Hours, for Terms, etc., 
10 a.m. to 12 m., and 1 to 6 p.a. Oct. 22. 



July 29, 1882. 



CALIFORNIA ADVERTISER. 



15 



CRADLE, ALTAR. AND TOMB. 



CRADLE. 
Uuu in tiii-. aty, July II, t.. ttu *(fc ••[ B. Bam a dtugfatar. 
lu.uck in khtedty, Jul* '.--*, i.- the wUt oJ G. Brodek, » ion, 
li v m In this city. July it, u> the wife at Julius liaimi, ■ daughter. 

Dorm— In ihli chy, July as, to the wlfool Edward B. Cutter, 

i'aktm- iii iini iitv, July it, t" the wilt of j k. Outer, t daughter, 
Pom in tin* city. July -i. to the wife el Frank & Dor^ason 

>n In IbJi >n>, July IS, to the wife "( Edward P. Diiggan, a mm. 
Dorcby- lu ihle city, Jul] '.'u. to the wife «>( J, J. Doroey, ■ daughter. 
PaVOOM -In tin- Otty, Juu ; , to the wife uf Elcnry Kancort, a son. 
Frank— I u Ihla city. Jul] w, feu the wife of B. n Frank, » daughter. 
OuLMmirii- In thai citv. July 'J^, t'i the wife <>( Qeuige QoManTtb, a son. 
Hi'uulkhtus -In this city , July 10, to the wife >>f M. J. Bufldleston, a son. 
JanU -In Ihll city. July is. t<> the « i(v of Charles L. Junks, a son. 
JrsrtK-soN-ln this city, July "23. to the wife of Captain J. W. Jesperson, a daughter, 
LmaMLlr— In this city, July 10, to the wife of Captain J. Linskill, a daughter. 
Lkwe.h - In this «ity. July 24. U> the wife "f William Lewis, a son. 
I.k*h Iii tins city, July '-'-J, to the wife uf M Lewis, a daughter. 
Lamkrkt- In this ,ity. July -M. to the wifu of William Lambert, a daughter. 
Hi Da Ud> In this city. July 20, to the wife of C. H. McDonald, a daughter. 
M uionky In this city, July fil, to the wife of J. A. Mohoney, a son. 
Mitv-IIkll In this city, July 21, to the wife of John S. Mitchell adaugliter. 
McVkKim !n this city, July 17. to the wife of James MeVicker, a daughter. 
McOraw In this city . July 20, to the wife of E. W. McOraw, a daughter. 
POTBAM In this city, July 81, to the wife of C. E. Pinkham, a son. 
PdHLbI In this city," July 18, to the wife of Frederick Puhk-y, a daughter. 
Si u.lva.n — In this city, July 24, to the wife of Patrick J. Sullivan, a son. 
Schkkrbr - In this city, July 22, to the wife of Joseph Scheerer, a son. 
Sorrnsin — In this city, July 22, to the wife of A. Sorensen, a daughter. 
Simmons -In this city, July IS, to the wife of W. J. Simmons, a son. 
Tvstisi — In this city, July 1!>, to the wife of P. Tustini, a son. 
Vandbr — In this city, July 19, to the wife of Ben. Vander, a daughter. 
Wiiitx— In this city, July 19, to the wife of George A. White, a son. 

ALTAR 
BaAT-WARRRS— .Tune 3, by Rev. Dr. Jewell, Charles E. Bray to Emma Warren. 
Bat-Joy— July 23, by Rev. E. R. Dille, Harry Bay to Luetta Joy. 
Barry-Smith— July 18, J. H. Barry to Susie M. Smith. 
Bari'h-Hochhkimrr— July 20, Mose Baruh to Miriam Hochheimer. 
Dean-Hoskab— July 24, James Dean to Mrs. Lizzie Hoseas. 
Haooktt-Enobliiardt— July 19, Forest F. Haggett to Louise D. Engelhardt. 
Halky -Thorn ton — July 19, M. C. Haley to Lizzie J. Thornton 
JsKsaBS-Ni'ssBAi'M— July 26, Charles Jenssen to Annie Nussbaum. 
Jones-Hood— July 19, by Rev. J. C. Simmons, Edgar Q. Jones to Ellis B. Hood. 
Kikn an- Walsh -July 0, P. J. Keenan to Anna M. Walsh. 

Marron-Donohtb— July IS. by Father Breslin, M. A. Marron to Katie Donohue. 
Moar-Abbott — July 19, Thomas A. Moar to Clara Abbott. 
Olive r-Koh.v— July 18, by Rev. J. M. Buehler, Alton V. Oliver to Lena Kohn. 
Rubs-Rubs— July 24, Ludwig D. Russ to Sophie Russ. 
Scbakfker-Rath— July 23, Charles Schaeffer to Minnie Rath. 
Smullrn-Fooarty— July 25, James Sraullen to Bridget Fogarty. 
Sethmann-Tiikrkorn— July 20, Henry' Sethmann to Treena M. Therkorn. 
Wblls-Fairma.n— July 23, William F. Wells to Louisa A. Fair-man. 
Watbrbi'RY-Wise— July 18, Charles S. Waterbury to Ada A. Wise. 
Woodbridqe-Ccrtis— July 18, Alfred F. Woodbridge to Marie L. Curtis. 

TOMB. 

Alexander— July 26, Elizabeth Alexander, a native of Ireland, aged 43 years. 
Bralrr — July 25, Jacob Bealer, a native of Germany, aged 47 years. 
Blaser— July 21, Henriette Blaser, a native of France, aged 23 years. 
Donoghub— July 21, Patrick J. Douoghue, aged 50 years and 3 months. 
HiNCXLBY—July 22, Dr. George E. Hinckley, a native of Mass., aged 56 years. 
Jackson — July 19, Amelia, wife of Byron Jackson. 
Kohler— July 22, Caroline Kohler, aged 55 years and 9 months. 
Lynch— July 26, Celia Lynch, a native of Ireland, aged 36 years. 
McElweb— July 24, D. B. McElwee, a native of New York, aged 55 years. 
Morrin — July 19, Louis Morrin, a native of France, aged 79 years. 
Scuenck — July 21, Charlotte A. Schenck, aired 48 years. 



AN INTERESTING ABTGALLERY. 

The well known art-gallery of Messrs. Morris & Kennedy, Post 
street, is at present supplied with an unusually attractive collection of 
fine paintings. Among others, there is an exquisite piece of marine 
painting by the celebrated De Haas, entitled "On a Lee Shore," to 
which we called attention four weeks ago. To appreciate this picture, 
one must examine it carefully. A painting of a lady's head, by Oscar 
Kunath, is something worth more than a passing notice. The head-dress 
and the metal thereon are brought out with remarkable clearness and re- 
alism. There are two painted mirrors, by Miss Alice Chittenden and 
Miss S. Bender, respectively, that are especially interesting. The paint- 
ing is remarkably well done, the design being floral, yet differing from the 
ordinary run of floral work. A series of BketcheB by Miss Marie Rey, repre- 
senting Bcenes in the vicinity of Cloverdale and Monterey, are placed in 
the front part of the establishment, and seem to attract a great deal of 
attention and favorable comment. They are very vigorous, and Bhow a 
thorough knowledge of out-door work. There is, also, a fine marine 
painting by the celebrated W. T. Richards, entitled "High Tide," the 
scene being located on Jersey beach. Mr. Richards is regarded as one of 
the closest students of Nature, and stands in the front rank of American 
artists. This painting is characteristic of his best work. A "Dog 
Head," by Lizzie Strong, is a very realistic piece of work. By the way, 
this young lady is now studying in Paris, where she is progressing very 
favorably, and is receiving much encouragement from Van Marcke and 
other celebrated masters. A picture of Miss Matilda Lotz, at work in 
her studio, by Henry Bacon, of Boston, is technically very good, but the 
likeness of Miss Lotz is poor. There are also two small panel pictures — 
one of pink roses, and the other a bunch of Cherokee roses— by Miss 
Alice Vincent, a very promising young local artist. In a short time, a 
picture which Miss Marie Jones is finishing, and which promises to be a 
very fine painting, will be on exhibition at this gallery. Of course, the 
pictures which we have mentioned are but a few, out of the large collec- 
tion, which happened more particularly to attract the writer's attention. 
In addition to the oil paintings, there is also a large collection of artists' 
proof engravings, etchings, etc., which are interesting and worthy of 
study. In connection with their gallery, Messrs. Morris & Kennedy, of 
course, keep on hand a full supply of artists' materials, frames, etc., and 
their Btock seems to be fresher than any we know of in the city. Alto- 
gether, a visit to this establishment must be instructive and interesting to 
those who admire the beautiful. 



jREMOVAL 



A. F. NYE & CO. 



609 .nxicS. 611 3Vteti-lx.ot Street, 

GRAND HOTEL, 

WHERE THEY HAVE JUST OPENED 
A. New Stock of 

GAS FIXTURES ! 

Of the Latest Patterns and Designs. 
PACIFIC MAIL STEAMSHIP COMPANY. 

Tbe Company's Nteamera will sail Tor Yokohama and 
Hongkong: CITY OF PEKING, August 1, at 2 p.m. Excursion Ticket* 
to Yokohama and return at special rates. 

For NEW YORK via PAVAMA: COMMA, August 4th, at IS o'clock m., taking 
Freight and Passengers to MAZATLAN, ACAPULUO, SAN JOSE DE CPATEMALA, 
LA LIBERTAD and PUNTA ARENAS. 

Fare to New York— Cabin, $139; Steerage, $65. 

Tickets to and from Europe by any line for sale at the lowest rates ; also f..r Ha- 
vana and all West India ports. 

For HONOLULU, AUCKLAND and SYDNEY: ZEALANDIA, July 30th, at 2 
p.m., or on arrival of the English mails. 

$10 additional is charged for passage in Upper Cabin. Round the World Trip 
Tickets, via Now Zealand and Australia, 8650. 

Tickets must be purchased at least one hour before time of sailing. 

For freight or passage apply at the office, cor. First and Brannan streets. 

Jul y 29. W ILLIAMS, DIMOND & CO., Gencrul Agents. 

OCCIDENTAL AND ORIENTAL STEAMSHIP CO., 

Ijlor Japan and China, leave wharf, corner First and Bran* 
; nan streets, at 2 p.m., for YOKOHAMA AND HONGKONG, connecting at 
Yokohama with Steamers for Shanghai. 

BELGIC Saturday, July 22d I COPTIC Tues Sept 5th 

ARABIC Saturday, Aug. 12th BELGIC Thursday, Sept. 28th 

OCEANIC Thursday, Aug. 24th | 

Excursion Tickets to Yokohama and Return at Reduced Rates. 
Cabin Plans ou exhibition and Passage Tickets on sale at C. P. R, R. Co.'s General 
Offices, Room 74, corner Fourth and Townsend streets. 

For Freight, apply to GEORGE H. RICE, Freight Agent, at the Pacific Mail Steam- 
ship Company's Wharf, or at No. 202 Market street, Union Block. 

T. H. GOODMAN, General Passenger Agent. 
LELAND STANFORD, President. July 22. 

FOR PORTLAND AND ASTORIA, OREGON. 

The Oregon Railway and Navigation Company and Pacific 
Coast Steamship Company will dispatch every four days, from Spear-street 
Wharf, for the above ports, one of their new Al Iron Steamships, viz. : COLUMBIA, 
OREGON and STATE OF CALIFORNIA. 

Sailing Bays 
July 1.6, 10, 14, 18,22, 26.30. | Aug- 3,7. 11, 16, 19,23,27,31. 

At 10 o'clock A. 31. 
Connecting at Portland, Oregon, with Steamers and Railroads and their connecting 
Stage Lines for all points in Oregon, Washington and Idaho Territories, British 
Columbia and Alaska. 

Ticket Office 214 Montgomery Street 

GOODALL, PERKINS & CO., Agents, 
June 24. No. 10 Market street, San Francisco. 

OCEANIC STEAMSHIP COMPANY. 

FOR HONOLULU, H. I. 
The Steamship SUEZ Dodd, Master 

Will Leave for the Above Port 

WEDNESDAY, August 9th, at IS O'clock M., 
From Main-Street Wharf. 

Freight will be taken at $4 per ton. Freight will be received on Wednesday, July 5th. 
For freight or passage apply to 

JT. D. SPBEfKlilS & BROS., Agents, 
July 22. 327 Market, corner Fremont. 

PACIFIC COAST STEAMSHIP COMPANY. 

Steamers of tbis Company will sail from Broadway Wharf 
as follows : 
For Victoria, B.C., and Puget Sound Ports: On the 10th, 20th and 30th of each 
month (except when such days fall on aholiday, then on the day previous). Steamer 
of the 30th connects at Port Townsend with steamer ' ' City of Chester " for Alaska. 
For Portland, Oregon, in connection with the O. R. & N. Co.: Every 4 days. 
For San Luis Obispo, Santa Barbara, Los Angeles and San Diego: 5th, 10th, 15th, 
20th, 25th and 30th of each month. 

For Santa Cruz, Monterey, San Simeon, Cayucos, Gaviota, Santa Barbara and 
Ventura: Every Wednesday at 8 A.M. 
For Eureka, Areata, and Hookton, Humboldt Bay: Every Wednesday, 9 o'clock. 
For Point Arena, Mendocino, etc. : Every Monday. 
Ticket Office, No. 314 Montgomery Street, near Pine. 
GOODALL, PERKfNS & CO., Agents, 
Nov. 26. No. 10 Market street. 

FOR HONGKONG, VIA HONOLULU. 

The British Steamship " Anjer Head," Roper, Master, 
will have quick dispatch for above ports. For freight and passage apply to 
July 29. WM, T. COLEMAN & CO., Aijents. 

The new food, which has cured the chronic dyspeptics of Japan, is 
Midzu Ami (Japanese Malt), at Ichi Ban. 



16 



^AN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER AND 



July 29, 1882 



REAL ESTATE TRANSACTIONS. 

Recorded in the City and Count? of San Francisco. California, for 
the Week ending July 24, 1882. 

Compiled from the Hecurds of the Commercial Agency , 401 California St. , ft. F. 



Wednesday, July 19th. 



OEA.NTORAND GRANTEE. 



C H Hindman to Geo W Ellis., 
Hngh Ward to Lewis P Sage.., 



Mtchl A Smith to Jennie A Smith. 
Matthew A Gillick'to Jas Gillick. 

Caroline Clark to Hib S & Ln Soc 

Augustus P Ruse to Adolphus Ross 

Same to P O Wegener 

ChaB Lester to FredkKlopper 



DESCRIPTION. 



Undivided h sw 4th and Welsh 

N California, 110 e Brederick.e 82:6 x 
132:7, being in Western Addition 500; 
subj to a mortgage 

N Vallcjo, 75 e Leavenworth, e 25x100, 
being in 50-vara 885 

Commencing 300 s Napa, and 42 e Illi 
nois, s 130 x e 25, being in Potrero 
Block 427 

N Vallejo, 133:100 e Polk, e 2x8:8, n 120, 
w 189, bw 12G to beg, being in West- 
ern Addition 23 

SeFolsom.40 ne Columbia, ne 20x100, 
being in 100-vara 230 

Ne Columbia, 187:6 nw Harrison, nw 25 
xl20, being in 100-vara 231 

S Tyler, 247:6 w Polk, w 36:6x120, being 
in Western Addition 65, subject to 
mortgage for $7,746 



5 
Gift 

1,500 

(10,500 
5 
5 

19,000 



Thursday, July 20th 



Catherine Fowler to Asa Pisk . . . 
Hib S & L Soc to Roger O'Donnel 

Olivia McGill to Alice C Mordecai. 

L Gottig to Annie Varness 

Reeee Llewellyn to P J Donahue.. 

Theo LeRoy to R Steinbach 

I N Thorne to Jas D Galbraith 

Jos Haine & wf to Fred Bazan — 

Geo T Marye to Harriet Brown 

Geo F Sharp to Jno L Haskell 

Henry Hinkel to Annie B Voorhics 
Tbos McNulty to Sarah McNulty.. 



Subs 42 to 47, Precita Valley lots 182 to 
193 

S Vatlejo, 107:6 o Powell, e 20, 8 63, w 
33:4, n 3, e 13:4, n 60 to beginning, be- 
ing in 50-vara 111 

Se Perry, 180 sw 4th, sw 25x80, being in 
100-vara 173 

W Gnerrero, 110 s 17th, b 50x80, being 
in Mission Block 79 

Nw Howard, 137:6 bw Main, ne 45:10 x 
137:6, being in B & W 704 

Blocks 74, 75, 76, 152, 153, 154, Ootside 
Lands 

Re-record, undivided 1-6 cor FolBom and 
17tb, w 2 miles, s 160 chains, e to 
Ships channel, n to a point, etc 

S Sutter, 167:6 w Stockton, w 30x137:6, 
being in 50-vara 564 

S Pacific ave, 125 w Fillmore, w 25 x 
127:8!$, being in Western Addition 349 

S Turk, 160:5 w Market, w 22:11, s 78:434 
se 42:7^, ne 42:6^. ne 25:6#, nw 
38:ll)tf, n fi6:5& to beg, being in 50- 
va 983; w Stockton, 40 s Broadway, w 
80s 8 60, being in 50-vara 83 

N Clay, 137:6 w Buchanan, w 34:4 x 
127:8M 

E Cook, 514:10 n Pt Lobos ave, n 25x100 
being in Western Addition 641 



Friday, July 21st. 



Jno H Murphy to Kate Murphy. . 

Gnstavc Mahe to W S KeyeB 

Jos MofBt to Luke Donnelly 

Henry G T Engel to I Levy 

L Metassion to H G T Engel 



Chas Quinn to J Higgins., 



David Goggin to Cornelius King. 
W S Pelonze to H Lustenberger. 
Thos Ridlington to A Biecatti.... 



Cong Sherith Israel to Lena Morris 
Mary Bray to Lawrence Breslin... 



Geo Mearns to Wm H Brown 



N Landry hy exrs to Nelson Koon 
Tomaso Cresta toGBFacco.. 



S LThelleretal to FL Such... 
Michl Short to Robf J Tiffany 



N 23d, 25:6 e Noe, e 25x114 

Nw Davis and Broadway, n 137:6x137:6. 

S 18th, 75 e Hartford, e 25x75 

N Post, 45 w Dupont, w 25x72:6 

" 75 " " being in 50- 
vara 580 

N 22d. 305 w Valencia, w 25x114, being 
in Mission Block 74 

Lots 1355, 1356, 1357, Gift Map 3 

Lot 221. Same 

E Lapidge, 200 n 19th, n 25x80, being in 
Mission Block 71 

Lot 16x16, on Eucalyptus avenue 

N 30th, 280 w Church, w 25x114, beins 
in Harpers Addition 99 

Tax Titles 1878, 1879, CertB No 1371 to 
1876, for 1879, 1880, Certs 1747, 1748. 
1751 to 1756 for 1880, 1881, Certs 1616, 
1617, 1619 to 1624 

Lots 4, 9 in blk U, Railroad Homestead 

Lots 1 to 4, 8 to 10, block 17, West End 
Map 1 

Lots 16 and 17, block 24 and lots 14 and 
15, block 23, Pioche and Robinsons- 
subdivisions of San Miguel Ranch.. 

Ne Broadway and Laguna, e 25x137:6 
Western Addition 192 



$ 764 

3.&31 
Gift 

5,500 



1,000 

11,500 

1,300 



7,840 
Gift 



$ 350 

31,<I5U 

800 

25,000 

1 



225 
326 



200 
Grant 



120 
3,000 



Saturday, July 22d. 



W Leviston to Geo Leviston 

Louisa Gaulhier to L Greenbaum 



John Morrissey to C McCullongh. 
Saml L Theller to LoniB Mel 



Louisa Melto Theo Wetzel.... 

City & County S F to Same 

Theo Wetzel to J D Walker. . . . 
Park Ld Asan to A E Juillerat.. 



B J Shay to John O'Connor. . 



Conrad Herold to Michl Maloney. 



Same to Godocue Schrader 

Gustavus W Beckh to E T Allen.. 



iW East, 137:6 s Pacific, s 20x76:6 

IS Valley, 203 e Sunchez, e 51:4x114, be- 

I ins in Harpers Addition 97 

Se Tehama, 462:6 sw 5th, sw 37:6x80, 
being in 100-vara 204 

W Valencia, 30 n 18th, n 25x100, being 
in Mission Block 70 

Same 

Same 

Same 

N McAllister, 233:2,V e 1st ave, e 26:51*, 
n 137:7^, w 25, s 13T.8H to beginning; 
lot 17, block 787, Western Addition .. 

E San Jose avenue, 80:8 n 24th, n 248, e 
162:6, s 221:9, sw 196:8 to beg, being in 
Mission Block 156 .. 

N WelBh, 85 w Zoe, e 85 x n 24, being in 
100-vara 163 : bud 23, Harris Map 2, 
and lot I, block 514, Bay View Home- 
stead Association 

W Gilbert, 225 s Brannan, se 24x80, be- 
ing in 100-vara 319 

N Jackaon, 68:9 w Buchanan, w 34:4}$x 
90, being in Western Addition 267 



400 
8,000 



1,800 
1 



600 
50 

300 

300 

4,000 



Monday, July 24th. 



RF Knox to WD St Clair.. 



N M de Rothschild to I Steinhart. 



Peter J Donahue to L P Drexler. 



Geo T Marye Jr to Annie Letcher. 
Harry Lacbman to Ann Molloy 

L Altshuler to Chas Payler 

Ellen Cabill to Annie Nolan 

Ferdinand Reis to Seth B Blake. . . 
Hib S & L Soc to Bernard Dowd. . 



Thos Kendnck to Desea Pico.. 
Walter Young to L Englander . 



Hib S and L Soc to M Schwamm . 



J C Bockmann to W J Shaw.. 



Ne D st and 14th ave, n 350, e 94:10, sw 
356:10&, w to beg ; lolB 1, 2, 3, 4, blk 
393, Great Park Hd 

Nw Montgomery and Commercial, w 60 
x25; una hi n Commercial, 50 w Mont- 
gomery, w 7:6x50 

E corner Beale and Beach & Water lot 
372, ne 137:6, ee 11& inches, aw 137:6, 
nw 5% inches to beginning, being in 
B&W3S1 7... 

W Fillmore, 130 s Pacific, b 27x100, be- 
ing in Western Addition 349 

N 13th. 25 e Berenice, e 25, n 75:5, w 25, 
e 77:83$ to beg, being in MisBion Blk 
17 

S 16th, 220:9 e Valencia, w 25x115, being 
in Mission Block 40 

S Pine, 82:6 e Larkin, e 20x137:6, being 
in 50-vara 1144 

S Sacramento, 206:3 w Lagnna, w 40 x 
127:8^ 

Ne Lafayette, 55 nw Natoma, nw 29:3,ne 
86:6%, se 29:lii, sw 82:27-100 to beg.. 

Und lot 100x137:6 Pettit claim 

E Valencia, 192:2^ n Mission, n 77:11% 
se40:9?e, sw 66:5& to beginning 

S Tyler, 137:6 e Gongb, e 25x120, being 
in Western Addition 136 

Sw Harrison and 12th, s 61:03tf, w 80, n 
67:9%, e 80 to beg, being in Mission 
Block 17 



1,700 

900 

5,000 

Gift 

4,000 

2,435 
1,000 

250 

3,750 



ChEO. STREET, Agent News Letter, 30 Cornhill, E. C, London. 

JOYCE'S SPORTING AMMUNITION. 

[ESTABLISHED 1820.) 

The attention of Sportsmen is Invited to the following- 
Ammunition, of the best quality, now in general use throughout England, 
India and the Colonies : Joyce's Treble Waterproof and F 3 Quality Percussion 
Caps; Chemically-prepared Cloth and Felt Gun Wadding; Joyce's Gas-Tight Car- 
tridges, for Pin-fire and Central-fire Breech-loading Guns ; Wire Cartridges, for killing 
game at long distances, and every description of Sporting Ammunition. Sold by 
all gun-makers and dealers in gunpowder. 

FREDERICK JOYCE fc CO., Patentees and Manufacturers, 
Oct. 29. 57 Upper Thames street, London. 

LIEBIG COMPANY'S EXTRACT OF MEAT. 

inestaud Cheapest Meat-flavoringr Stock for Soaps, Made 

Dishes and Sauces. 

LIEBIG COMPANY'S EXTRACT OF MEAT, 

An Invaluable and Palatable Tonic in all Cases of Weak 
Digestion and Debility. " Is a success and boon for which Nations should feel 
grateful. See " Medical Press," " Lancet," " British Medical Journal." etc. 



F 



T 
R 
R 



LIEBIG COMPANY'S EXTRACT OF MEAT. 

CAnntion-- Genuine only with fac-simile of Baron Lieblg*** 
J Signature, in blue ink, acrof:*Jjabel. 

This caution is neccssarj - owing to various cheap and inferior substitutes being in 
the market. 

LIEBIG COMPANY'S EXTRACT OF MEAT. 

To be hail of all Store-keepers, Grocers and Chemists. Sole 
Agents for the United States (wholesale only), C. David Sc Co., 9, Fenchurch 
Avenue, London, England. Sold wholesale by RICHARDS & HARRISON, San 
Francisco. June 10. 

he Summer Sun and Dust. Ladies and all exposed to the scorching 
rays of the sun and heated particles of dust, will find that the most 
cooliug and refreshing preparation for the face, hands and arms, is 

oh- I amis* Kalydor. which eradicates all prickly Heat, Sunburn, Tan, 
Freckles, Stings of Insects, etc., and produces a beautiful and delicate 
complexion. 

owlands' Macassar Oil prevents the hair falling off or becoming dry 
during the hot weather, and eradicates scurf and dandruff. 

Rowlands* Odonto is the purest and most fragrant Tooth Powder ever used, 
aud contains no acid or mineral ingredients, which are so detrimental 
to the teeth and gums. Its purity especially adapts it for the teeth of 
young children. Ask any dealer in perfumery for Rowlands' articles, 
of 20, Hatton Garden, London. 

BRITISH BENEVOLENT SOCIETY OF CAL. 

Attendance, daily, from 10 a.m. to 1 p.m., by the under* 
signed, to receive subscriptions and donations, and to furnish all information 
relating to the Society. J. P. McCURRIE, Secretary, 

Oct. 23. Room 4, No. 531 California st. 

L. LANSZWEERT, 

ANALYTICAL AND CONSULTING CHEMIST, 

360 WOTTBTB STREET, SAN FRANCISCO. 

[July 15.] 

AUGUSTUS LAVER, 

Architect, 

Furnishes Plans, Specifications and Superintendence for 
the Construction or Renovation of Dwelling Houses, and every describtion of 
Building. Office: 19 S. F. STOCK EXCHANGE, Pine 8 



■ Take the Elevator. 



a street, S. F. 
Dec. 10. 



NOTICE. 

For the very best photographs go to Bradley A Rulofson's, 
in an Elevator, 429 Montgomery street. Oct. 29. 

REMOVAL. 

T Wad ham has removed to Hoom 2, Wo. 538 California St., 

M_jlm Bank Commissioners' O ffice. June 10. 

*J££ +*-» <QiOfi per day at me. Samples worth $5 free. 

SSpO TO *$£ \J Address Stlhson & Co., Portland, Maine 



July 29, 1882. 



i'AUKOUNIA ADVERTISER, 



17 



NOTABILIA. 



THE PEDDLERS SONG. 

U«nu whli«uitfiv«nux>w; ,i nomuhon, 

Cjl*w blui ut'er *-u cn« ; Po» ay lull loan; 

OlotMM «we*t uiUaiMk nwes ; Hliu k> ol -i. el, 

Whit rn&itU liuk from head i< 
Oomebirral ms, earns; ooma bay.oamebity, 
tin j , UJd, or else your Iuuh-b crj 

William Shakm-karr. 



link, (or facrw .,nJ fur no*M 
i(iU*lc-Itr*i-rlrl. necklace, wubcr ; 
:. .hiImt; 



A bibulous parson vu introduced to -.\ bdv who had been repi 
t> liim ii mrftt ■ fetlantod :*rti*t. M.- greeted bet by suing: " 1 uadsr* 
stant), ma<Um, that you paint?" She itarted, bloshed deeply, and, re- 
tnf) herself after a few seconds, said with a* much nciility of toot 
an. I ittyle a> iht OOOld command: " Wall, if I do iMiint, I don't make any 
mjatake end put it on my nose." The bibulous panon scratched his ear 
thoughtfully for a moment, and then he observed that the Imperishable 
Paint, which is sold by J. Ii. Kelly ft Co., Market street, below Heale, 
ooism already mixed, covers three times the apace that ordinary paint 
doe*, ud i-< impervious to sun or rain. 

There was in the State of Ohiah 
A maiden named Helen Maria, 
Who ever would *ail 
Dowo a bannister rail 
When she thought there was nobody nigh her. 
Now her brother, whose name was .losiar. 
Fixed the rail with a piece of barbed wiar ; 
But it wouldn't be best 
To tell you the rest, 
For we're blushing already like fiar. — Boston Star. 

"I baa mashed my finger," howled a boy, running into the room 
where his mother was Bitting. " Which finger?" asked the mother. "I 
have forgot," said the child, as he stopped crying. " Wait till I gn back 
and find out." When he " found out" he went back into the house and 
yelled for half an hour, and the poor mother didn't have sense enough to 
thrash him. But still, if she sends $2 50 and her photograph to the 
Xkws Letteb Medallion Company, she will receive in return 100 photo- 
graph medallions, already gummed and perforated, and just the size of 
a postage-Btamp. 

11 What is home without an oil can ? 
What is home without a poker? 
What is home without a woman? 

And a man to hug and choke her? 
What is home without a garden, 

And a faithful wife to make it, 
And a darling whom the parents 

Both can often take and Bhake it ?" 

Little Miss Innocent (seated at dinner, to pompous old cove) " Mr. 
S., won't you drink?" S. — "Yes, my dear, certainly, but why?" Miss 
I. — "Because mamma says you drink like a fish, and I want to see huw 
fishes drink." A painful silence, lasting over fourteen minutes and thirty- 
seven seconds, followed, and then the pompous old cove remarked that 
every one who wanted to*get pure and unadulterated liquors should go to 
P. J. Casein & Co. 'a, corner of Washington and Battery streets. Families 
supplied in retail quantities at wholesale rates. 

" How are you, John?" remarked a friend, 

As he met John on the street ; 
" Come in, my boy, and take a drink, 

For it's rarely that we meet." 
" A fact," said John ; " I'll go with you ; 

For, as I happen to think, 
We rarely meet, but when we do, 

It is always meet and drink." 

" Presumption begins in ignorance and ends in ruin." On the other 
hand, the production of Kidney- Wort began with wise cautions and sci- 
entific research, and its use ends in restoring shattered constitutions and 
endowing men and women with health and happiness. " My tormented 
back " is the exclamation of more than one poor hard-working man and 
woman ; do you know why it aches ? It is because your kidneys are 
overtasked and need strengthening, and your system needs to be cleansed 
of bad humors. You need Kidney- Wort. 

Now the bull-dog, like a fox, 
Shoots around, and in the box 

Fondly roota. 
While he searches for a bone 
Doth the urchin throw a stone, 

And he scoots. — Puck. 

Parson: "I wish to complain, Mrs. Diggins, of the conduct of your 
daughter at the Sunday-school to-day; it was rude to the extreme." Mrs. 
D. : " Ah, it's what they taches her at that theer board-school as dun it ; 
yesterday she come home and she says, ' Mother, they are a-taching of me 
vulgar fraxshuns.' What can you expex after that, sir?" The parson 
replied that he expected nothing but that Bradley & Rulofson, the pho- 
tographers, corner of Montgomery and Sacramento streets, take accurate 
pictures and finish them exquisitely. 

I am going to the Lordy, Lordy dah, 
I am going to the Lordy, Lordy dah ; 
If you get there before I do, 
Tell 'em I am coming, too, 
Lordy dah, Lordy dah, Lordy dah. 

— OH City Blizzard. 
A West Point cadet has already won a certain amount of fame by 
being the owner of one hundred anu twenty pairs of white duck trowsers. 
Sitting here in our luxurious homes, we little dream of the cruel hard- 
ships our West Point heroes are forced to endure — especially when the 
washerwoman puts too much starch in a superfluous place, or sends in her 
bill. But we all know that the Arlington Range, which can be obtained 
from De La Montanya, Jackson street, below Battery, is the most perfect 
cooking apparatus ever constructed. 



n-tit Ar.it. i I 1M A j 

ii. '■ ■ btgb ojd, bad old Bey : 



1 am Hying, Egypt, ii 

boot heels moving fu»t ; 

WaM •"'* o! I I am flying, Egypt, flying, ' 

Egypt ol the dim old past I Forth p»y- 

I am i! tlyiug, 

Even us the itarted mnlal 

■■■ II, Cleopatra, 
I am going to Josnny Bull! 

—LouitviUe Courirr Journal, 
A new item Bays that the bent female circus -rider in Russia I 

aedretisky, who " turns !k double mmeraault through ■ I p, and carries 

her name, which i« painted in the center, along with bar. To turn a 
double somersault through a hoop may not bo a very remarkable: 

but to get her mum- through, without knocking off Boms ol its corners, 
is certainly an astonishing performance, although it does not alter the fact 
that Noble Bros., 642 Clay street, are the best house and sign puintera in 
this city. 

He is n mastodon. A jackass or a flunkey, 

For all the world has said it ; Or may haps a unico'n! 

And it's greatly to bis credit But in spite of all temptations, 

That he is a mastodon! He preferred his grog and rations, 

For he might have been a moukey, And remains a mastodon! 

A husband having, in answer to his wife's repeated requests, cut off 
his whiskers and gone home to surprise her, was met by her in the hall 
and overwhelmed with hugs and kisses. After letting him go, she took a 
long look at him and exclaimed: " O, horror! is it you?" Slit mistook 
him for the good-looking stock broker who was in the habit of taking her 
to the Original Swain's Bakery, and treating her to the delicious ice- 
creams, confections, mince pies, etc., etc., that can be obtained there. 

This is the season of the year When cucumbers, in spiny coats, 

When groceries are replete Look meek and apostolic, 

With lots of new grown garden truck Yet loaded to the brim they are 
For village folks to eat. Of the meanest kind of colic. 

" I was ■with Grant," said the bare-headed stranger at Long Branch. 
" Ah," interrupted a kind man, " you are a veteran of the late war, and 
need money to buy a loaf of bread." '* No, no," continued the stranger, 
" I was with Grant. He was pulled out of the wrecked car first, and, 
confound him, he walked off with my hat! However, I'll Bend to White's, 
014 Commercial street, and get one of his stylish, well-made tiles. Every 
one speaks well of them." 

Explanatory note : " Jay Gould can't find time to shave." It should 
be said, out of justice to Jay, that this paargraph refers solely to his face 
and not to speculators. 

Why is Mr3. Lydia E. Pinkham's Vegetable Compound like the Mis- 
sissippi River in a spring freshet? Because the immense volume of this 
healing river moves with such momentum that it sweeps away all obsta- 
cles, and is literally flooding the country. 

J. P. Cutter's Old Bourbon.— This celebrated whisky is for sale by 
all first-clasB druggists and grocers. Trade mark— star within a shield. 

Best pictures taken at the Imperial Gallery, 724^ Market street. 

JOHN WIGMORE, 

HARDWOOD LUMBER, 

SHIP TIMBER, LOCUST TREENAILS, 
Veneers and Fancy Woods, 

129 to 147 Spear St. and 26 and 28 Howard St.. San Francisco. 

[April 8J 

THOMAS PRICE'S 

ASSAY OFFICE AND CHEMICAL LABORATORY, 

524 Sacramento Street San Francisco. 

Deposits of Balllou receive*!, melted into bar*, and retnrus 
made in from twenty-four to forty-eight hours. 
Bullion can be fonvarded to this office from any part of the interior by express, 
and returns made in the same manner. 
Careful Analysis made of Ores, Metal, Soils, Waters, Industrial Products, etc. 
Mines examined and reported upon. Consultations on Chemical and Metallurgical 
questions. March 20. 

LEE CRAIG, 

SEARCHER OF RECORDS, 

Notary Public and Commissioner of Deeds, 

316 Montgomery Street Bet. California and Fine. 

Commissioner for New York, Arizona, Nevada, Pennsylvania, Utah, Oregon, Idaho 
Washington Territory. Ohio, Massachusetts, New Hampshire, Illinois, New Jersey, 
and other States and Territories. DEPOSITIONS A SPECIALTY. Acknowledg- 
ments taken and oaths administered at any hour of the day or night. 

May 13. LEE D. CRAIG. 

SANTA CRUZ FURNISHED HOUSES, 

From S25 Per Month, in the Best Locations- 
EXCHANGE AND MART Santa Cruz, Cal. 



No. 2 of the new Land Journal, of Santa Cruz county, containing full details of 
Real Estate for sale, soil, climate, productions, etc., FREE BY MAIL. May 27. 



PROF. JOS. JOSSET, 



Graduate of the University of Paris; Ex. Professor of De 
la Mennais' Normal, France; late of Point Loma Seminary, San Diego. Pri- 
vate Lessons in the French Language. Residence: 1114 Stockton street, between 
Pacific and Jackson. At home from 12 to 2 p.m. Private Lessons given at the res- 
idence of the pupil. Dec. 6. 

Repairing Watches and Jewelry, B(o. 39 Third Street. 
[July 22.1 D. L. LEVY. 



18 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER AND 



July 29, 1882 



BIZ. 



The overland carrying trade, which includes the Central and Pa- 
cific Railroads, is an important and growing factor in the business of the 
Pacific Slope. During the month of June 26,000,000 pounds of General 
Merchandise was conveyed Eastward by these two railroads. Among 
the leading items thus carried across the continent we mention the fol- 
lowing, all in pounds: Barley, 318,820; Borax, 274,900; Beans, 251,900; 
Brandy, 150,180; Canned Goods, 1,042,700; Coffee, 442,700; Dried Fruits, 
101.640; Flour, 7,161,780; Hops, 80,050; Case Salmon, 2,985,910; Tea, 
4,017,020; Sugar, 2,700,830; Rice, 400,680; Wool, 2,291,370; Wheat, 
1,486,070. For the first six months of 1882 the leading items are: Bar- 
ley, 3,554,380 lbs.; Borax, 1,213,770; Canned Goods, 3.734,250; Coffee, 
1,357,630; Flour, 12,069,200; Leather, 1,229,750; Rice, 2,563,140; Quick- 
silver, 266,660; Silks, 1,193,910; Salmon, 7,731,150; Sugar, 15,111,730; 
Teas, 5,345,490; Wool, 14,734,530; Wheat, 30,689,730; Wine, 7,442,180. 
The total gross weight of the freight carried Eastward during the half 
year ending June 30, 1882, from California, was 139,901,100 pounds, as 
follows : 

Bv the Central Pacific, lbs 48,948,500 

By the Southern Pacific, do 90,952,600 

Total 139,901,160 

The Southern Pacific absorbed over 60 per cent, of the total. A large 
proportion of the freight by that route has consisted of Flour, Wheat, 
Fruit and Vegetables. The Southern Pacific was opened through in March, 
1881, by a connection at Deming with the Atchison, Topeka and Santa 
Fe" Railroad. For the first few months little freight was forwarded over 
the road from California, and no reports of such forwardings were made 
public until September, 1881. The record of East-bound freight by both 
routes since then iB as follows: 

Centr'l. Pac. South Pac. 

September, 1881, lbs 19,284,500 5,863,600 

October 28,877,400 4,471.300 

November 16,503,600 4,171,500 

December 10,746,000 2,587,500 

January, 1882 \ 6,124,700 5,788,700 

February 4,650,100 15,337,500 

March 5,574,900 17,190,700 

April 8,188,400 17,358,900 

May 15,066,900 24,391,800 

June 15,343,500 10,885,000 

The above table shows the varying character of the business. The 
total for the ten months is as follows: 

By the Central Pacific, lbs 124,360,000 

By the Southern Pacific 108,046.500 



Total 232,406,500 

We have no means of ascertaining the extent or value of the overland 
carrying trade Westward. Nevertheless it must be large, as it embraces 
all kindB of Goods, Wares and Merchandise. 

The Call Boards now control to a very great extent the Grain business 
of the Pacific slope — thus doing away with the old fashioned mode of 
selling by sample. On the Produce Exchange at first, but little traffic 
was done, but of late the business in Futures has expanded rapidly. First, 
Wheat Bran was the favorite article of speculation; that however was 
soon dropped, and now Futures in Feed Barley the hobby with large daily 
transactions, confined, however, to some half-dozen or less grain dealers. If 
they keep on as they have been doing this week they will soon have 
bought and sold the entire Barley crop of the State. There is less dis- 
position shown, however, to speculate in Wheat Futures at the moment. 
Still there is quite time enough for that. As for Futures in Corn, Rye, 
Oats, etc., there is little disposition shown by operators. 

Grain Bags come in for a good share of attention at the Call hoards, 
and at prices indicating a strong market. Calcutta Standards have been 
sold at 9fc and upwards, now held at 10c. Jute and other local makes 
rule from 9^c upwards. Indications point to a still higher range of prices. 

Flour.— The ship Siren has sailed for Liverpool with 25,770 bbls., all 
in cloth. We quote Superfine at $4@4 25 ; Extra Superfine, $4 50@5 ; 
Family and Baker's Extra, S5 25@5 75 $ bbl, all in cloth. 

"Wheat is in light stock, the old crop well nigh exhausted, and as yet 
but little of the new has been brought to market. For Spot lots of No. 
1 shippers offer $1 70 tf ctl., while millers pay SI 72£@1 75 for Extra 
Choice parcels. Futures command $1 65@1 70 $? ctl. for three months 
to come. 

Barley. — There is a very light stock of old yet remaining. New crop 
Feed sells readily on the Spot at $1 30 tf? ctl. New crop Chevalier may 
be quoted at SI 40@1 45 ; new crop Brewing, same range ; old crop do., 
S2@2 10. 

Corn.— No stock'and butilittle traffic. We quote Yellow Spot at $ 1 70; 
White do., SI 75. 

Oats.— The demand is light ; Spot sales at SI 75@1 85 K? ctl. 

Rye.— Nominal at §2 # ctl 

Hops.— Stock light and the market strong, with a rising tendency; 
quotable at 25 to 35c. for the different grades ; for Extra Choice 40c. is 
asked. 

Wool. — The stock is large, with no great demand, except it be for 
Choice Northern Fleece, which commands 25 to 27c.; Inferior to Fair 
rules from 18 to 20c. 

Tallow is scarce and wanted, and rules high at 7-J@8c. for Rendered : 
Refined, ll@114c. 

Hides.— Dry still command 19@19$c.; Wet Salted, 9@10c. 

Fruits. — The market is daily copiously supplied with Melons of all 
kinds, Apricots, Peaches, Plums, Pears, etc. Apples are not very plenti- 
ful, but all other kinds of seasonable fruits are abundant and cheap, giv- 
ing our canners a fine show for a large pack of the very choicest fruits, 
and at low prices. Grapes are now arriving; also Crab Apples, of im- 
mense Bize and beautiful in appearance. Tropical Fruits are now scarce 



and high. The Grape crop is very promisinz, and we will have a large 
Raisin crop this Fall and a plentiful supply of Grape Wine, and we hope 
it will be pure and unadulterated. 

The Pacific Mail steamship City of Peking has arrived during the 
week from the Orient, twenty-six days from Hongkong, via Yokohama 
seventeen days, with Government mails and 1,070 Chinese passengers; 
and for cargo Rice 27,900 mats, Mdse. 3,556 pkgs., Tea 2,065 pkgs.; also, 
in transit to go overland, Silk 269 pkgs.; Tea 10,479 pkgs. 

The British iron steamship Triumph, thirty-nine days from Hong- 
kong, via Honolulu, to Wm. T. Coleman & Co., has arrived with Island 
mails, 795 coolies, and for cargo 1,020 bales of Calcutta Grain Sacks. 

Coffee.— The Spot market is very dull, with heavy stocks during the 
week. About 700 bags of prime Green have been shipped Eastward by 
rail. We quote C. A. Greens at 10@12c. 

Sugar. — We are in receipt of several cargoes of Raws from Hawaii. 
The Rosario and Hazard, both from Eahului, bring 10,962 bags for the 
California Refinery. The Forest Queen, from Honolulu, had for cargo 
14,861 pkgs. Sugar, Rice 1,280 bags, MolasseB 194 bbls. The price of Re- 
fined Sugar is now 10A@12£c. # lb. 

Metals.— The British ship City of Athens and the bark Newark, both 
from Liverpool, add largely to our stocks of Iron, also of Tin Plate, etc. 
The price of Sydney Pig Tin has been advanced to 25@25ic, with sales. 
The stock is light. Attention is called to the large shipments of Pig 
Lead eastward by rail. In six months of this year 10,090,070 lbs. have 
thus been forwarded. 

Coal and Salt — We have nothing of an encouraging nature to remark 
concerning these two articles of import. Low prices continue to rule. 

Ho for Sydney.— The steamer Zealandia, sailing to-morrow for the 
Colonies, will carry 2,078 barrels Flour ; Canned Fruits, 2,696 caseB ; 
Salmon, 3,750 cases, and 25 kits Codfish ; 165 cases and 6 half-barrels 
Hops, 2,100 lbs.; Broom Corn, 5,498 lbs.; Quicksilver, 50 flasks. Also 
for New Zealand, Hops, 3,715 lbs.; Salmon, 350 cases ; Sugar, 10,000 lbs. 

Teas Eastward by Rail.— The City of Pekin from China and Japan 
brought 10,479 pkgs. in transit for Eastern cities. The regular freight 
charge on Tea from China to this port is 4c. # m. But this through Tea 
freight is billed from China to New York for 2c. $ lb. This reduction 
being made for the purpose of attracting Teas this route rather than via 
Suez CanaL The stoppage of crowds of Chinese coming to America, 
draws off a large source of income from the steamers, and they are forced 
to do something to make good this loss. 

Grain Fleet. — Since July 1st 18 vessels have been cleared for Europe, 
carrying 695,503 ctls. Wheat ; value, 81,194,314 ; same time 1881, 1 057 - 
814 ctls.; value, §1,497,362; besides 30,000 bbls. Flour. 

Grain Sacks.— At the Grain Exchange Call, Wednesday, 45,000 Hun- 
dee Grain Sacks sold, July delivery, at §9 50. The same lot brought at 
auction last week S8 62^. 

wheat and Flour. — The receipts for the past two seasons were: New 
crop, July 1st, 1882, Flour, 70,425 bbls.; Wheat, 701,880 ctls.; July 1st, 
1881, Flour, 61,035 bbls.; Wheat, 1,114,354 ctls. 

Ounalaska. — The steamer Dora, twelve days from Ounalaska, to the 
Alaska Commercial Company, brings a valuable cargo, consisting of Furs 
115 pkgs., 1,528 Fur Seal Skins, 16 pkgs. ditto JFurs, 8 pkgs. Specimens, 
and 857 Walrus Tusks (Ivory). 

Oregon Salmon. — The steamship Columbia, from Astoria, brings 
3,558 es. 

The London price of Quicksilver is £5 18s. 9d. per bottle. 

F urnitur e. 

F. S. CHADBOURNE & CO., 

735 MARKET STREET, 

Desire to inform the Public that their stock of FURNITURE, UP- 
HOLSTERY and BEDDING was never more complete than at present. 
Our Warerooms are filled with a most complete assortment of FINE, 
MEDIUM and LOW-PRICED FURNITURE, which is both BEAU- 
TIFUL and ARTISTIC. Our DESIGNS are new, and none but the 
BEST WORKMANSHIP is allowed to leave our SALESROOM. 
HOTELS and PRIVATE RESIDENCES furnished. Designs submit- 
ted and Estimates given. Proprietors of INTERIOR and SEASHORE 
resorts will find a very extensive assortment at special prices. Intend- 
ing purchasers will consult their own interests by thoroughly inspecting 
our Stock before purchasing. 

F. S. CHADBOURNE & CO., 

NO. 735 MARKET STREET. 

ST. J AMISS HOTEL, 

SAN JOSS, CAX. 
TTIiER BEACH Proprietor 

This Hotel is elegantly furnished, with all the modern improvements. The rooms 
are large, airy and beautifully situated in front of St. James Park, next door to the 
Court House. No expense has been spared in making this a First-class Hotel in 
every respect. 

American Flan Rates, $1.50 to 82,50 per Day. 

Upecial Prices by the Week or Month. 
Coach and Carriage at Depot on Arrival of all Trains. 



July 29, 1882. 



CALIFORNIA ADVERTISER. 



19 



The " Qreat Burlington Route " b admitted on nil hhIoh to I..- the 
uifortaMe ami parCwtly appointed Una of travel across the contT 
neoL The road-beds over which tliU route runs are well-made, and easy 
riding is. oonaaqosaltf, mured. Tin- oan are pulacea in i 
f llajiln hnniin in ooufbrt, In fact, tho manager* of this route rtndjj 
the comfort am! convenience of the passe n^on* in :ill matters, i;reat and 
small. The consequence is, the " Great BorHnirton " Monrtt the greatest 
portion of the nverUnd trahV. With travelers from the Orient and the 
anti|M>defl it is io particular favor. Australians and New Zealanders, in 
fact, an? Dttfootiy en.-lmntol with it. To a large extent this is due to the 
active *xartioni oi Mr. McKay, tho genial and accomplished agent of the 
route. This -.'nth-man in ■ perfect encyclopedia of information, such as 
passengers require, and is as obliging as he u well-informed. Ho attends 
to all details, securing ticket.--, seeing ta the checking of baggage, etc., for 
all paasengt-r* by his line — without coal to the passenger. 

It baa been a matter of astonishment for a long time past that while 
many other jewelry stores remained empty and, so far as the public is 
e<>nc.riied, deserted, Colonel Andrews' Diamond Palace is ahvay crowded 
with eager purchasers, desirous of taking advantage of the low prices 
which he, carrying, as he does — and selling them, too — the largest stuck 
of diamond! on the coast, is in a position to sell at On a recent visit to 
the Diamond Palace we observed that many farmers were investing con- 
siderable quantities of money in diamonds. Considering the limited op- 
portunities which the ordinary granger has to display ornaments of that 
Kind, this astonished us, and we asked the genial Colonel for an explana- 
tion. Be told us that farmers had found that diamonds were the safest 
and best io vestment they could make with their money, as gema of this 
kind were always increasing in value, carrying their cost and a good sub- 
stantial interest besides. 

From tbe report of the American Iron and Steel Association it 
appears that the United States last year produced 4,(541,564 tons of pig 
iron, 2,125,340 tons of rolled iron, 1,330,302 tons of Bessemer rails, 488,581 
feo&fl "f other rails, and 1,778,912 tons of steel. Imported iron and steel 
was valued at $61,555,078, and exported at $15,782,282 ; 782,887 tons of 
iron ore were imported, and 9,950 miles of railway and 42 iron vessels 
were built. This is an increase over the product of the previous year of 
340,1 50 tons of pig iron, 316,440 tons of rolled iron, 382.203 tons of rails, 
381,897 tons of steel, 288,479 tons of imported iron ore, 2,776 miles of 
railway and 11 iron vessels built. The imports of iron and steel decreased 
$1,892,828 ; the exports increased $2,821,287. 

The next term of the Hastings Law College will begin on Thursday, 
August 10th, at Pioneer Hall, Montgomery street. The examination of 
applicants for admission to the Middle Class, and all re-examinations, 
will be held at the place mentioned on Tuesday, August 8th, at 9 a.m. 
Examination of applicants for admission to the Junior Class will be held 
on August 9th and 10th at 9 a.m. Those who desire to become students 
in this school should call upon the Registrar, C. P. Hastings, 63G Clay 
street, before the dates mentioned, and register their names. This Col- 
lege, we are pleased to notice, is already taking a prominent position 
among the law-schools of the country. 



Housekeepers in this city cannot be too careful in their selection of 
hams. Most of our grocers have their stores adorned with spurious hams, 
put up in yellow canvas, and branded "Chicago," the intention being to 
deceive the public into the belief that tbe meat inside is Eastern cured 
ham, whereas, in fact, it is California ham, and is the production of 
the Chinese butchers, who monopolise the pork market of San 
Francisco. In order to avoid being imposed upon purchasers should in- 
sist upon getting the " Whittaker Star Hams," which are juicy, well 
cured, and delightfully flavored. The " Dupees " is, also, a reliable brand 
of Eastern cured ham, and makes an excellent article of food. 



The Mendelssohn Quintette Club, of Boston, assisted by Miss 
Cora R. Miller, will give a farewell series of three concerts, at Piatt's 
Hall, on Monday evening, July 31st, Thursday, August 3d, and Friday, 
August 4th. The concerts already given by this Club have delighted all 
who heard them. It is an admitted fact that the quintette play with an 
ensemble and musical feeling which cannot be improved upon. All lovers 
of good music should attend these farewell performances, not only in order 
to encourage true art but because they are rich treats and cannot be en- 
joyed every day. ^ ___^^_ 

The report of the Hu Urn's Bay Company for the year ending May 
last shows a net profit of 73,507/. After providing for the dividend of 14s. 
per share there remains 27,172/. to be carried forward. The sale of lands 
for the seveu months ending April last realized 1,008,098/., of which 261,- 
124/. has been paid in cash, and the balance, bearing interest at the rate 
of 7 per cent, per annum, will be placed to the credit of the land account 
as collected. A return of capital of 2/. per share has already been announ- 
ced. 

In reference to the article on Baking Powders that appeared in our 
columns several weeks ago over the signature of Dr. Bleasdale, we beg to 
state that the same was not an editorial exposition of our opinion, as 
many seem to believe, but merely appeared as all other paid matter that 
is handed in for publication. 

The Neptune and Mermaid Swimming Baths, which are situated 
at the foot of Hyde and Larkin streets, are convenient of access, and as 
comfortable and cleanly as it is possible for baths to be. Every one should 
patronize them. 

St. John's Presbyterian Church, Post Street— Tbe Rev. Dr. 
Scott, pastor, will preach Sunday at the usual hours. The public cor- 
dially invited to attend. 

State Fair.— The 29th California Exhibition at Sacramento commences 
September 11th and ends the 16th. Just five days devoted to sight-seeing 
and horse-racing. 

No family Dyes were ever so popular as the Diamond Dyes. They 
never fail. The Black is far superior to logwood. The other colors are 
brilliant. 



B DHQUSBTIOBABJ 

VERT BEST PIANO 

MADK IN AMKKH A. 

BUY ONK A-INO KK CONVINCKD. 

CHA3, 8 . EATON. Agent,... 647 Market at. ■ opp Kearny. 8 F. 

ASSESSMENT NOTICE. 

New York Mining < mnpn o \ .--1mm it Lion <»f principal place 
<>f boilnMB, Ban Prantisco, California; location of worn. Gold Bill, storey 
County, Nevada, Notioe i* hereby given that at a meeting of UM Beard <-( Direct- 
or* , held on the twenty-eighth tiny of .Time, 1883, u assessment (No. 28) of Ten 
cnii-. per share ma levied upon tho capital stock of the corporation, payable imme- 
diately, in United Btetei gold ooln, to the Secretary, at the offloe ol the Company, 
Room 8, No. 327 Pino street (San FnnciBOO Stork Exchange Building), San Fran- 

olaod, California. 

Any BtOOk upon which this assessment shall remain uii|»aid onthethirty-flrstday of 
July, 18*2. win be delinquent, and advertised for sale at public auction ; and un- 
ion payment is made before, will be aoldoo mono ay, the twenty-first day .>f August, 
1888, to pay the delinquent assessment, together with costs of advertising' and ex- 
iwnses of sale. By order of the Board of Directors. 

F. E. DIETZ, Secretary. 

Office— Room 8, No. 327 Pine street (Stock Exchange Building), San Francisco, 
California. July 8. 

ASSESSMENT NOTICE. 

Albion Co n«oIl tinted Mining Company. --Location of prin- 
cipal place of business, San Francisco, California. Location of works, Eureka 
Mining District, Eureka, Nevada.— Notice is hereby given, that at a meeting of the 
Board of Directors, held on the 20th day of June, 1882. an assessment (No. 11) 
of Twenty-five Cents per share was levied upon the capital stock of the corpora- 
tion, payable immediately in United States gold coin, to the Socretary, at the of- 
fice of the Company, Room 9, No. 327 Pine street, San Francisco, Cat. 

Any stock upon which this assessment shall remain unpaid on the THIRTY-FIRST 
(31st) day of JULY, 1882, will be delinquent, and advertised for sale at public auction, 
and, unless payment is made before, will be sold on MONDAY, the TWENTY-FIRST 
day of AUGUST, 1S82, to pay tho delinquent assessment, together with cost of 
advertising and expenses of sale. By order of the Board of Directors. 

D. B. CH1SHOLM, Secretary. 
Office -Room i>, No. 327 Pine street, San Francisco. Cal. Jul y 15. 

ASSESSMENT NOTICE. 

CHOLLAK MINING COMPANY. 

Assessment No. 9 

Amount per Share 25 Cents 

Levied.... July 17th 

Delinquent in Office August 22d 

Day of Sale of Delinquent Stock Sept. 12th 

W. E. DEAN, Secretary. 
Office— Room 79, Nevada Block, No. 309 Montgomery street, San Francisco, Cal- 
fornia. July 22. 

ASSESSMENT tUTICE. 

SYNDICATE MININ3 COMPANY. 

Assessment No. 4 

Amount per Share 15 Cents 

Levied July 19th 

Delinquent in Office ■ August 24th 

Day of Sale of Delinquent Stock September 13th 

J. STADTFELD, JR., Secretary. 
Office— Room 26, No. 419 California street, San Francisco, Cal. [July 29. 

DIVIDEND NOTICE. 

Office of the Balwer Consolidated Mining: Company, San 
Francisco, July 25, 1882. — At a meeting of the Board of Directors of the 
above-named Company, held this day, Dividend No. 0, of Ten Cents (10c.) per share, 
was declared, payable on SATURDAY, August 12th, 1882. Transfer Books closed 
on Wednesday, August 2d, 1882, at 3 o'clock p.m. This dividend iB payable at the 
Farmers' Loan and Truat Company, in New York, on all stock issued there, and at 
the office in this city on all stock issued here. WM. WILLIS, Secretary. 

Office — Room No. 29, Nevada Block, No. 309 Montgomery street, San Francisco, 
California. July 29. 

DIVIDEND NOTICE. 

Office of the Bodie Con. Mining Co., Room 62, Nevada 
Block, San Francisco, July 27th, 1882.— At a meeting of the Board of Directors 
of the above-named Company, held this day, a dividend (No. 9) of twenty-five (25c.) 
cents per share was declared on the capital stock of the Company, payable TUES- 
DAY, August fifteenth (15th), 18S2, at the office of Messrs. Laidlaw & Co. , New York, 
only on stock issued from the Transfer Agency in that city and at the San Francisco 
office only on stock issued here. Transfer Books will close on Wednesday, August 
9th, 1882, at 3 o'clock p. m. (July 29.) W, H. LENT, Secretary. 

DIVIDEND NOTICE. 

The German Savings and Loan .Society. For the half-year 
ending this date, the Board of Directors of THE GERMAN SAVINGS AND 
LOAN SOCLE I Y has declared a Dividend on Term Deposits at the rate of Four and 
Thirty-two One Hundredths (4 32-100) per cent, per annum, and on Ordinary De- 
posits at the rate of Three and Six Tenths (3 6-10) per cent, per annum, free from 
Federal Taxes, and payable on and after the 10th day of July, 1882. By order. 
Sau Francisco, June 30, 1882. (July 1.) GEO. LETTE, Secretory. 

DIVIDEND NOTICE. 

The California Savings and Loan Society, northwest cor- 
ner Powell and Eddy streets. The Board of Directors have declared a divi- 
dend to Depositors at the rate of four and thirty-two on~--hundredths (4 32-100) per 
cent, per annum on Term Deposits, and three and sixty one-hundredths (3 60-100) 
per cent per annum on Ordinary Deposits, free from Federal Tax, for the half-year 
ending June 30, 1.-S-, payable on ami after July Id, 1882. 
July 8. VKKNO.s CAMPBELL, Secretary. 

ANNUAL MEETING. 

Office of the Risdon Iron aud Locomotive Works.— The an- 
nual meeting of the stockholders of the Risdon Iron and Locomotive Works 
will be held on MONDAY, August 7th, 1882, at 11 a.m., at the office of the Com- 
pany, southeast corner of Beale and Howard streets, San Francisco, for the election 
of Trustees for the ensuing year, and the transaction of ouch other business as may 
come before the meeting. [July 29.] L. R. MEAD, Secretary. 

ZEITSKA INSTITUTE, . 

NO. 922 POST STREET. 

Day and Boarding School for Young- Ladies and Children. 
KINDERGARTEN. Next Term will commence July 24th. To secure admis- 
sion for boarding pupils, applications should be made as early as possible. 

May 13. MADAME B. ZEITSKA, A.M., Principal. 



20 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



July 29, 1882. 



COMMENTS ON FOREIGN AFFAIRS. 
The situation in Egypt has not changed materially during the past 
week. Arabi Pasha is still busily intrenching and recruiting near Cairo, 
while the British necessarily remain inactive, pending the arrival of their 
military force. There is no longer any doubt that this will practically 
amount to an army of occupation, not for the moment only, but for all 
time. When the pride of England is aroused and her honor and interests 
are involved in any warlike issue, all local and political prejudices and as- 
cerbities immediately disappear, and the existing Government at once 
finds ready and hearty support from those who have been its bitterest en- 
emies in the piping times of peace. If Gladstone had asked of Parlia- 
ment four times as many men and as much money as he has thought neces- 
sary for the occasion, his demands would have been acceded to without 
a murmur. Indeed, the only fault that the people now find with him i3 
that he has not drawn more liberally upon the muscle and treasure of the 
country. However, the force to be sent to Egypt — some 25,000 troops of 
all arms — will probably be amply sufficient, and if not, there are plenty 
more where they come from. The task of whipping Arabi will, therefore, 
not be a very difficult one, nor is its accomplishment likely to occupy 
much time when once the campaign has fairly opened. But after that, 
what then? There's the rub, and therein lies the danger. Judging by 
the action, or, rather, inaction of the Continental Powers, it seems that 
they are fondly cherishing the belief that they can use England as the 
monkey used the cat, to pull the chestnuts out of the fire. They 
flatter themselves that they can sit by and let John Bull do 
all the fighting and then jump in for a share of the spoils. 
But here is just where the Powers are likely to find them- 
selves grievously in error. England has invited them separately and 
collectively to co-operate with her in restoring order in Egypt, and on 
various grounds they have all begged to be excused from losing a man or 
spending a dollar in the cause. England, therefore, has pitched in single- 
handed, and it is very safe to predict that she will stick to the spolia 
opima. She no langer asks co-operation — in fact it is doudtful if she 
would now accept it, no matter from what quarter it came. At the 
eleventh hour the Sultan reluctantly consents to send Turkish troops to 
Egypt, but though he will be allowed to do so, his action will in no way 
affect the movements or ultimate purposes of the British. So, also, with 
the French. Their half-hearted support has brought them less credit than 
if they had taken the course of Germany, Italy and Austria, and had 
kept out of the trouble altogether. When it comes to a division of the 
spoils it is our belief that France will get "badly left," as the slang 
phrase hath it. It is not easy to say what will be England's course of 
action after she has conquered Egypt. Some of our contemporaries have 
it that the Land of the Pharoahs will be formally annexed to the British 
Empire, but such an idea is not to be entertained for a moment. The 
country will doubtless practically become a British possession, but nomi- 
nally the Khedive will still be its ruler, and it is quite possible that he 
will be released from all allegiance to his present Suzerain, the Sultan. 
An English protectorate of the strongest and most pronounced sort will 
probably be proclaimed, and it is more than likely that England will go 
so far as to seize Port Said and Suez, if not the Canal itself, as part pay- 
ment of the war indemnity which she is certain to claim. Whether the 
Continental Powers will calmly accept the situation remains to be seen, 
but those who object to it will assuredly have trouble on their hands. 

It appears that the conduct of both the Sultan and of Arabi depends, 
to a great extent, upon the attitude of the ulemas of Cairo and Constan- 
tinople. These ulemas, in a general sense, are the learned men of the 
country, and in Constantinople they form a distinct body, whose office'it 
is to watch over the correct interpretation of the Koran, and the right 
application of its teachings to law and polity. Of course, their influence 
is very great with all classes, and more especially in matters where the 
faith of Islam is concerned. They are supposed to regard with disfavor 
the dispatch of Turkish troops to Egypt for the purpose of suppressing 
the rebellion, on the ground that such a measure aids the Christian, 
whose hand is against the Moslem. They are slow to recognize the Sul- 
tan's troops as "protectors" of Islam when they go to the assistance of 
the English, and hence the Sultan's dilemma. Arabi, on the other hand, 
has bis only hope of even temporary success in the possibility of foment- 
ing a holy war, which means nothing less than pitting all Islam against 
all Christendom the world over. Without the support of the ulemas, he 
can of course do uothing in this direction, and his cause would at once 
be hopelessly lost. We are told that, if he is abandoned by them, he 
will endeavor to effect some sort of a compromise. It strikes us very 
forcibly, however, that Arabi's opportunity for compromising was passed 
some time ago. 

And supposing that the ulemas were to side with Arabi, and use their 
influence in favor of a " Holy War," what would it amount to, after all ? 
There are as many factions in Islam as there are in Christendom. The 
spiritual sovereignty of the Sultan is disputed by nearly all Mahamine- 
dans who are not under bis temporal rule. In spite of Arabi's threat to 
stir up the Moslems of India against the British Government, he would 
probably find, if he attempted it, that the Asiatic Mohammedans cared 
about as much for their African and European co-religionists as a Meth- 
odist cares for an Episcopalian. 

The statement that English soldiers had been guilty of looting the 
Khedive's Palace is proved to be a wanton and wicked lie. If the corre- 
spondent of the New York Herald finds it necessary to draw upon his im- 
agination in order to furnish his paper with " news," he might, at least, 
invent lies that do not slander the honor of his hosts and protectors. 

The report that one of the Phcenix Park murderers has been captured 
and has betrayed his accomplices, is a very welcome piece of news, but 
we fear that it is to good to be true. Sir William Vernon Harcourt, the 
Home Secretary, apparently attaches some importance to the arrest, how- 
ever, since he declines to discuss it in Parliament, on the ground that it 
would be inconsistent with public interests, and we are further told that 
the belief increases that the prisoner's story has some foundation. 
Heaven grant that it has. For our own part we should dearly like to 
have a pull at the rope, which in that case is noosing itself to fit the 
throttles of Mr. O'Brien and his " pals." 



SKETCHES FROM NATURE. 

In the show-window of Messrs. Morris & Kennedy, on Post street, 
are exhibited twelve sketches, landscapes and wood interiors. They are 
the work of Miss Rey, a former pupil of the San Francisco School of 
Design, taken during this season's trip to the country. As indicating the 
great ability of Miss Rey as a landscapist, their exhibition is of interest, 
just at this time when San Francisco is crowded with studios, presided 
over by teachers whose only merit lies in beiner able to copy chromos and 
teach others the vile process. The foundation of Miss Rey's art educa- 
tion was laid broad and deep in the School of Design. She was early 
taught that this copying of a picture bore the same relation to art that 
copying an author's manuscript did to literature. Her native talent has 
been trained in the right channel, and the result we see in these sketches, 
produced under the inspiration of every true artist's master — nature. 
They should be seen of all — those who paint and those who do not — but 
above all, and before all, are several professional artists, who have been 
for years painting pictures and disposing of them at large values. They 
ought to take a hint from these, and do — or try to do — likewise. And to 
the army of women — who are wasting their time and money for that 
which is but a passing fancy producing work, of which, in all probability, 
they will one day be ashamed— let them go before these studies, and see 
if they cannot discover the difference between such work and the manu- 
factured stuff with which they are more familiar. Not that it is claimed 
that the ability to paint in the manner of these sketches is inherent in 
every one — of course it is not — but many a talent to do so is doubtless 
hidden in the napkin known as the studio factory. And it seems more 
than strange that so many sensible people persist in ignoring the great 
advantages of the School of Design. It has now been established many 
years, and, as against the long list of its former pupils, who have distin- 
guished themselves in art, how many who have taken inspiration from 
private studios have been heard of — ye3, how many, and who are they ? 

SNEATH'S BOUNCE. 

The action of Mr. R. S. Sneath in reflecting on the honor, ability and 
truthfulness of several of our best known and most respected business 
men, at the meeting of the stockholders of the Merchants' Exchange 
Bank, on Tuesday last, shows him to be a man utterly unfit to hold the 
important position he does. Mr. Sneath'B action in connection with the 
Merchants 1 Exchange Bank and the Merchants' Exchange shows that he 
possesses in a large degree a trait of character which is very much akin 
to the instinct of the slave-driver. Of course gentlemen with large 
financial interests at stake could not be expected to tolerate Mr. Sneath'B 
insolent, overbearing manner, more especially when his pig-beaded obsti- 
nacy was involving them in law suits without end, and preventing them 
from receiving dividends, Mr. Sneath seems to think that no person has 
any right to have a voice in the management of business affairs in which 
he has the slightest interest. His ambition is to be a financial Czar, with 
power to deport his subjects to Siberia, or cut off their heads, at will. 
Unfortunately — or fortunately — his ambition is much above his capacity. 
He should try and file off the angularities of his unfortunate infirmity of 
disposition. 

It is curious to what an extent English officials can economise the truth 
when anything out of the common takes place. This has been the case 
respecting the arms and ammunition lately discovered at Clerkenwell. It 
has been given out that the rifles were purchased at a sale of old Govern- 
ment stores; that different marks had been substituted for those they pre- 
viously bore — in short, that they had arrived at the place where they 
were found without anybody being to blame. All these statements are 
simply at variance with fact. The muskets, the Colt revolvers, and the 
100,000 cartridges were, one and all, fabricated in America, and imported 
into England for the purpose of being taken to Ireland. It need hardly 
be said that the Custom House people must have been most culpably 
negligent to allow such goods to be landed ; but this is exactly what the 
fables that have been promulgated about the business were intended to 
conceal. 

It is with profound regret we announce the death of Mr. Edward 
H. Bryant, son of ex-Mayor Bryant, of this city. The deceased gentle- 
man, who was only twenty-seven years of age, left this city for ^-Etna 
Springs, for the benefit of his health, some three months ago, he being 
suffering from a previous attack of paralysis. On Sunday, the 16th inst., 
in company with several other gentlemen, he took a ride among the hills 
back of the Springs. While thus engaged his horse threw him violently, 
and he received several severe contusions on the head, which rendered 
him unconscious, in which condition he remained until death ensued on 
last Saturday. The deceased was raised and educated in this city, and 
enjoyed the respect and confidence of a large circle of friends. The tragic 
ending of his young life was unutterably Bad, and his family have the 
heartfelt sympathy o f the entire community. 

Mr. Adolphus Ruhl, senior partner of the firm of Ruhl Bros., has 
passed over to the silent majority. The deceased gentleman was born in 
Hanan, Prussia, in 1843, and consequently at the time of his death was 
only thirty-nine y ears of age. He accompanied his parents to America 
when he was sixteen years of age, and in 1868 he arrived in San Francis- 
co. Since that time Mr. Ruhl has resided and engaged in business here. 
As a business man, he obtained and retained the respect and confidence of 
the commercial community. Socially, his many superior qualities of 
mind and heart made him a general favorite with all with whom he came 
in contact. His death, before he had reached the prime of promising 
life, is indeed a lam entable occurrence. 

Arabi Pasha, whose name is now on every lip, was, until a few years 
ago, a noted and successful speculator on the Bourse and Stock Exchange. 
He made a fortune in the Suez Canal Bbares alone, and prior to that was 
for a period a clerk in a business office in Cairo. He studied, but did not 
graduate, at the great Moslem University, El Azhar, and afterwards 
passed the military school at Cairo. His ambition developed with his 
fortune, and is quite as much an unknown quantity. He is an Egyptian 
of the purest blood, and bears the distinctive marks of the race on his 
countenance. 

"Robert Sheehy" is the firm name chosen by the surviving wife and 
sons, for the purpose of carrying on and conducting the large and exten- 
sive grain export trade recently transacted by the late Robert Sheehy. 




vms'*c 



ffe 






( ER 



tfaliforuia SWwtijitr. 




Vol. 33. 



SAN FRANOISOO, SATUBDAY, AUS. 5, 1882. 



NO. 4. 



G 



OLD H.VUS~S90@91(>-KEKiNKnStLTKB— 1U@11| tfcent. discount 
Mexican Dollars, 8^@9 per cent. disc. nom. 



'Exchange on New York, 5c t' $100 premium ; On London Bank- 
ers, 49ga. ; Commercial, 49§@49{d. Paris, sight, 5-12J francs per 
dollar. Eastern Telegrams, 10c 



■ Price of Money here, 6@10 per cent, per year— bank rate. In the 
open market, 1@1 J per month. Demand light. On Bond Security, 
3@4£ per cent, per year on Call. 

" Latest price of Sterling in New York, 486@489. 



PRICES OF LEADING STOCKS AND GOV. BONDS. 


Son Francis 








Stock* and Bonds. 


Bid. 


Asked | Stocks and Bonds. Bid. 


Asked 


BOOTS. 




E1SURANCB CO.MrA.NIKS. 






Cal. Sutc Bonds, 6V57 


105 


— State Investment 


122 


125 


S. P. City A Co. B'ds, 6s, '5S 


N'om. 




130 


— 


S. F. CitvACo. B'ds,7fl ... 


Nom. 




12S 


127 


87 






109 


40 


(JO RAILROADS. 






Sacramento City Bonds. . . . 


60 


62) 0. P. R. R. Stock 


00 


97 


J 05 


— C. P. R. K. Bonds 


116J 


1174 


Santa Clara Co. Bonds 


90 
















105 


107 'IN. B. and Mission R. R 


98 


100 


Los Angeles County Bonds. 
Los Angeles City BondB .... 
Vmj*a & Truckec R. R. Bd9. 
Nevada Co. N. G. R. R. Bds 


106 








110 




99 












110 




Nom. 


Nom. 




— 


125 jClay Street Hill R. R 


Nom. 


Nom. 


Oregon BAN. Bonds, 6s . . 


107 


109 ,\3. F. GaslightCo 


59 


60 


105 
120* 


107 Oakland Gaslight Co 


30J 
52( 


31 




55 


BANKS. 




] Catifor'a Powder Co 


115 


— 


Back of California (ex-div).. 


16S 


— 


Giant Powder Co (new stak' 


118 


120 


125 


128 1 


Atlantic Giant Powder 


S2J 


85 




128 


— 1 


Gold and Stock Telej^h Co. 


m: 


65} 


INSPRANCB COMPANIES. 






S. V. W. W. Co. 'a Stock.... 


116 < 


116} 




120 
128 


123 ! 
132 


Pociflc Coast S. S. Co '3 Stock 


119} 

— 


120 


Fireman's Fund (ex-div).... 






125 


126 




107 


110 


Pacific Rolling Mills, 120, 


125. Cala. Dry Dock, 55, 60. Safe Deposit Co., 45, 45J. 


Vulcan Powder, 66J, 67i. 


The activity in the Powder stocka continues, but in other securities 


there is but little doing. Andrew Baied, 312 California st. 



STOCKS. 

The mining stock market has not received much attention from us 
for some weeks past, because there has seemed to be nothing new or inter- 
esting to mention. A gradual continuing decline in prices and volume of 
transactions has reduced it to a Bmall factor of current business. The 
main prop of hope and confidence in the outcome of the Comstock ap- 
peared to be weakening, so that between heavy assessments and delayed 
developments the means and patience of the stock gambling public were 
becoming exhausted. The traffic, however, from its very uncertainty is 
mercurial, and it is surprising how quick, upon any fair encouragement, 
hope and activity are revived, and men yesterday cast down with disap- 
pointment and losses may to-morrow be buoyant with new expectations. 
The business is subject to sudden and unforseen changes, often pleasant 
and profitable as otherwise, and although the burden and strain have been 
depressing, we think the conditions now justify faith in a material im- 
provement. The recent return to personal supervision of work at the 
front by Mr. Mackay indicates that important interests require the pres- 
ence of experienced, capable direction, and it may not be an assumption 
to predict that under his judgment and co-operation a new lease of bo- 
nanza fame may be recorded. 

Meteorological Summary, week ending 7:58 P. _., Thursday, Aug. 
3d:— Highest barometer, 30.147— 2d; lowest, 29.943^Tuly 28th ; average 
during the week, 30.022 ; maximum temperature, 67 — 1st and 2d; mini- 
mum, 53.5— 30th ; average during the week, 59.1 ; highest relative humid- 
ity, 96 per cent. — 31st ; lowest relative humidity, 65 per cent. — 28th ; 
average during the week, 82.7 ; prevailing direction of wind, west ; maxi- 
mum hourly velocity of wind, 32 miles per hour, 3d ; average weather 
during the week, fair ; rainfall during the week, .00 ; total rainfall, sea- 
Bon of 1882-83, 0.00 inches. 

The coinage at the Mint in this city for July aggregates $1,640,000, of 
which sum $700,000 was in standard dollars and the balance in double 
eagles. 

For Dublin. — The British ship City of Florence carries to Ireland : 
Flour, 19,050 bbls., Starr Mills, Vallejo ; value, $92,250; shipped by 
Starr & Co. 

Latest Grain Charter.— The British ship British Princess, 1,554 tonB, 
has been chartered to load Wheat for Cork, U. K, at £2 17s. 6d. 

For Hongkong, Direct. — The British iron steamer Malabar is adver- 
tised to sail Tuesday, August 8th, at 2 p. m. 



MARRIOTT'S AEROPLANE COMPANY, 

For Navigating the Air. 

Office of the Aeroplane Company for Navigating the Air, 609 Mer- 
chant street. Office hours from 1 to 2 p.m. 



Orders for Engraving In the Ptieto-Ei-irravlug- Process cau 
now be executed at the "News rotter" Office for less than 
half the cost of Wood Engraving, and In one-hal t the time. 
Remember, we furnish a hard metal Electrotype readyjfor 
the Press. 



TABLE OF CONTENTS. 



A Modern Drinking Sonj,' (Poetry) 13 

Another Pioneer Gone 10 

A Magnificent Place 'A 

A Change of Location 14 

A Wedding Portion 2 

Ammonia in Food. 20 

Albion Consolidated Mining Co 20 

Biz 18 

Comments on Foreign Affairs 20 

Cradle. Altar and Tomb 14 

Electricity, Etc 19 

Fashion's Voice 5 

Foreign Notes 16, 19 

Letter from Paris 9 

Literary Notes 4 

Local Notes 16 

Mrs. Beecher-Stowe's Birthday (Poetry) f* 
Notabilla 17 



Pacific Coast and Eastern Notes. 16 

Pleasure's Wand 

Heal Estate Transactions 16 

Snorting items 7 

Society 3 

Sunbeams 12 

Steam and Street Railroads 20 

Stocks 1 

The Original Home of the Horse 9 

The Fountain Maiden 4 

The World, the Flesh and the Devil.... 8 
The Mining Bureau and Its Collection. . 2 

Thunder-Storms 18 

Town Crier 11 

The Public Health 10 

The Sunday Law Issue 10 

The Japanese on the Indemnity Bill... 10 
Welcome, Watts (Poetry) 2 



Latest from the Merchant's Exchange.— New Yobk, Aug. 4, 
1882. United States Bonds^s, 1204; Us, 114§ ; ex-5s, 101J; ex-6s, 101J. 
Sterling Exchange, 4 86@4 89. Pacific Mail, 46$. Wheat, 118@120; West- 
ern Union, 89£. Hides, 24@24£. Wool — Spring, fine, 20 @ 32; Burry, 
15@20 ; Pulled, 20@45 ; Fall Clips, 15@18 ; Burry, 12@14. Lon- 
don, Aug. 4.— Liverpool Wheat Market. 9s. lld.@10s.2d., Cal.; 9s.l0d.@ 
10s. 6d. Red Am. Spring. Bonds, 4s, 122$ ; 4£s, — ; ex-6s, — . Consols, 
99 11-16. Money, 99| acct.; Silver, 51 15-16. 



Our readers will do well to note that all claims of merchants under 
the new act for the distribution of the balance of the Geneva award money 
must be presented to the Court of Commissioners of Alabama Claims, 
which is now organized, on or before January 14th, 1883, and be ad- 
dressed to D. W. Fessenden, Esq., Clerk of the Court of Commissioners of 
Alabama Claims, Washington, D. C. The Judges are H. G. Wells, 
President ; James Han hi n and Asa French. 

Japanese Ship-building. — At the Government works at Shinden, 
three wooden screw steamers were built during the year ending June, 
1881, and at Messrs. Kirby & Co.'s works four wooden steamers were 
launched during the year 1881, and engines and boilers provided for two 
others. Two iron steamers are now on the stocks. At other ship-build- 
ing yards in Osaka five or six vessels of European form were launched du- 
ring the year. 

A French engineer has originated a plan by means of which passing 
ships could send messages by the submarine cables ; he would float buoys 
with the necessary connecting wires and apparatus at intervals of a day's 
journey along the line of the cable, each numbered and properly lighted 
at night. 

The Clearing House returns show a constant increase, the exchanges 
for the month of July during the past three years footing up 350,726,310 
in 1882, $45,878,211 in 1881, and 837,810,616 in 1880. Since January of 
this year to the close of July the exchanges amounted to $349,513,485. 

Californians Abroad, July 8th, 1882:— Paris: A. Weil and fam- 
ily. London: J. C. Haselton, J. Findla, Sarah Hamlin, Victoria E. 
Harrell, Mr. M. H. and Mrs. De Young, San Francisco ; Alice E, Owen, 
Oakland.— Continental Gazette, July 8, 1882. 

The steamer City of Peking for Hongkong, hence 1st inst., carried 
the following shipments: Hongkong and Shanghai Bank (49 bars) silver 
bullion, $68,800; Chinese -Mexican dollars, $45,976 95 ; gold coin, $15,220; 
total, $129,996 95. 

London— Liverpool. — The British ship Abbie S. Bart, 165 days from 
London, has arrived, with iron, cement, eta, to Rogers, Meyer & Co. 
Bark Colusa, 145 days from Liverpool, brings 1,500 tons coal to Stevens, 
Baker & Co. 

The Bank of British North America announce an interim dividend in 
respect of the half-year ending June 30 at the rate of 6 per cent, per an- 
num, amounting to 30s. per share, payable on July 5. 

Entered at the Post-Office at San Francisco, Cal., as Second-Class 

M atter. 

London, Aug. ..—Latest Price of Consols. 99 11-16. 



Printed and Published by the Proprietor, frederlck Marriott, 607 to 615 Merchant Street, San Franciico, California, 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER AND 



Aug. 5, 1882. 



WELCOME, WATTS! 

Mr. Watts, of Gatherer fame, 

Returns to clear his clouded name ; 

Not because it suits him best, 

But because the Law's behest, 

Reinforced by bands of steel 

Round the wrist and near the heel, 

Make it rather awkward for 

Mr. Watts to snub the Law. 

Mr. Watts, while in the East, 

Tried to prove he was no beast — 

Sought to show, in fact, that he 

Ought a cherubim to be — 

That a despot can't be wrong, 

That God only loves the strong 

When they beat and bruise the weak — 

ThuB Watts in his defense doth speak. 

Mr. Watts, you're welcome back, 

With the ghosts upon your track. 
" Ghosts?" you ask in feigned surprise. 

Aye, within those hollow eyes 

Phantoms of the dead we see, 

That are ever haunting thee. 

From the deep they rise in crowds, 

Ghastly in their seaweed shrouds ; 

Ghosts that whisper 'neath their breath : 
" Thou hast driven ua to death — 

Henceforth, till thy dying day, 

Close beside thee we shall stay." 

Ghosts that on their faces bear 

Marks which thou hast planted there — 

Dread sign-manual, sealed with blood, 

Stamped with the "knuckle-duster's thud. 

Mr. Watts, are e'er your dreams 

Disturbed by faint and fainter screams, 

Echoing from the distant wave 

That kindly lends your crime a grave ? 

Among your ghosts is there a boy 

Who was his widowed mother's joy, 

Whose voice among your dead still speaks 

And for scant mercy|vainly shrieks ? 

Saintly, injured, outraged, mate, 

Much we sorrow for thy fate ! 

Brutal, beastly and unclean, 

Heartless, callous and obscene, 

Thy traducers say thou art. 

How they wrong thee! For our part, 

All our hopes would sated be 

Could we build a gallows-tree 

High enough to honor thee. 
San Francisco, August 4, 1882. 

THE MINING BUREAU AND ITS COLLECTION. 
Art effort is now being made to induce Governor Perkins to permit the 
collection of minerals, at present in charge of the State Mining Bureau, 
to be removed to Denver, to be used as an exhibit from this State at the 
Mineral Exposition which is to open at that place next month. We 
question if the Governor has any authority to authorize such a proceed- 
ing; but even if he had, he should decline to countenance such a propo- 
sal. It is a notorious fact that the Denver Exposition was not projected 
with a view to promoting mining industries, and it is an equally well- 
known fact that it is not expected to accomplish that purpose. Besides, 
our own Mechanics' Fair will open about the same time, and will be 
visited by an infinitely greater throng, both in point of numbers and 
wealth, than will visit the Denver Exposition. Why send this collection 
of mineral specimens to Denver, when we can make better use of it at 
home ? Denver is a country town ; San Francisco is the commercial cen- 
tre of the Pacific slope of this great country, and a place where capital 
and capitalists congregate. These facts speak for themselves. There is 
another circumstance connected with this matter, which should not be 
lost sight of, because it is peculiar. We refer to the fact that the manag- 
ers of the Mechanics' Fair ihave in previous years asked that this sefi- 
same collection be exposed at their exhibition, and, strange to say, their 
proposal received the most strenuous opposition from those persons who 
are now actively engaged promoting the movement to take specimens to 
Denver. There is something strange about this; something peculiar ; 
something which would stand an explanation and a good deal of it. Ap- 
parently, somebody yearns for a junketing tour at the expense of some- 
body else. 

In Memoriam. — It is with sincere sorrow that we record the death of 
the Rev. William Vaux, sometime Rector of the Episcopal Church at 
Santa Cruz, and Senior Chaplain of the United States Army. During 
his lifetime the deceased gentleman, though suffering from age and in- 
firmity, never failed to exert a powerful moral influence, by precept and 
example, over the community in which he dwelt. " His venerable fea- 
tures," says a local paper, " fine physique and military bearing made his 
figure a conspicuous one, while his unvarying courtesy and genial man- 
ners endeared him to all." He was, from our personal knowledge, in 
every respect the type of a Christian, and, therefore, of a gentleman. 
The funeral services were conducted by the Right. Rev. Bishop Kip, as- 
sisted by Chaplain Wourt, U. S. A. , and by several other clergymen. We 
wish to extend our heartfelt sympathy for the loss they have sustained to 
the widow and children of the deceased. 



The British Government has arranged that the outward and home- 
ward India and China mails will be conveyed through the Suez Canal, 
instead of by rail between Alexandria and Suez. We may add that all 
the English engine drivers and conductors on the railways have left, by 
order of the British Consul. The P. and 0. steamers will merely call off 
Alexandria and land and embark dispatches for the fleet and local mail*. 



A WEDDING PORTION. 

In^ Germany and France associations for the purpose of providing 
marriage portions for their members have been in existence for years past. 
In the social economy of modern civilization they occupy a position similar 
to that occupied by life insurance companies. The one enables a man or 
a woman who is working for an ordinary wage to provide himself or her- 
self with a marriage portion far beyond what they could save out of their 
earnings ; the other enables the propertyless man to leave behind him an 
estate for the support of those who have been dependent on him. In this 
country the marriage assurance idea is comparatively new, and, like all 
new ideas, it has been abused by men lacking in business qualifications, 
who have undertaken to put it in operation. The result has been that 
many failures have taken place. Right here in this community within 
the past two months no less than three alleged " marriage insurance as- 
sociations " have collapsed. They collapsed because they were conducted 
by incapable men and upon erroneous principles. On the other hand, the 
4i Universal Benevolent Association of California for Unmarried Per- 
sons," has, from its start, been a pronounced success, because it is founded 
upon sound principles, which experience and mathematics alike have 
demonstrated to be correct, and carried on by gentlemen who possess 
great business sagacity and who have reputations to lose. Its systems 
and its tables have been examined by several of our more prominent and 
successful business men (who have allowed their names to be used as in- 
dorsing the scheme) and pronounced liberal and safe. This Association, 
with one assessment, has paid twenty-eight marriage portions, and now 
has a membership of 2,600 persons. It is firmly established and can be 
relied upon. 

In connection with the semi-annual encampment of the California 
Department of the Grand Army of the Republic, which will be held at 
Santa Cruz, on Saturday, Sunday and Monday, the 12th, 13th and 14th, 
it has been determined to organize a grand excursion, which will be open 
to the public. The excursion will travel by the S. P. 0. R. R., and a re- 
turn ticket, good for three days, will only cost S3. The members of the 
G. A. R. residing in Santa Cruz have organized themselves into a com- 
mittee, and have canvassed the hotels, boarding-houses and private dwell- 
ings with a view to providing board and lodging for the excursionists at 
very low rates. This committee will meet the excursionists, and will give 
each one his choice of accommodation, at the low rates which have been 
arranged for, without putting the excursionists to any trouble. The cost 
of board and lodging per day will range from $1 to $2 50, so that the total 
expense of the trip will only amount to from §5 to $8 for each adult 
person. 

An interesting case, illustrating commercial depravity, was on trial 
before Judge Sullivan, of the Superior Court, this week. Some time 
back Mr, Stanford, President of the C. P. R. R., became dissatisfied with 
his gardener, and intimated his intention of dispensing with that func- 
tionary's services. The gardener, believing in the old saw about mak- 
ing hay while the sun shines, went off to J. P. Sweeney & Co. and 
purchased §11,231 worth of the most valueless seeds in that firm's 
Btore, being allowed a commission, we believe, of 25 per cent, on the 
transaction — which, in itself, indicates crookedness. Mr. Stanford very 
properly refused to pay the bill, and has contested the matter in the 
Courts, although in so doing he has lost time that to him was worth 
five or six times the amount at issue. The conduct of the firm in 
question has not, in this matter, been that of honorable business men. 

To-morrow afternoon Haverly's Mastodon Minstrels will appear at 
Woodward's Gardens. This is the same troupe which has been playing 
during the past week at the California Theatre, and its reputation is so 
pronounced that there is no necesaity to say anything in its favor. A 
splendid bill has been prepared, and as Sunday is the last day of the Mas- 
todons in San Francisco, the Gardens will, no doubt, be well filled. 



EXCURSION TO SANTA CRUZ! 




BENEFIT 

...OP THE... 



RELIEF FUND, 

GRAND ARMY OF THE REPUBLIC, 

Saturday, Id;. 12, 1882. 

VIA 

S. F. C. EAILSOAD, Narrow Gauge. 

SEDUCED BATES OE FAEE ! 

TICKETS, good for Return on Sunday or Mon- 
day, $3.00. 
Children, half-price. Tickets for sale at 222 
MONTGOMERY STREET, at the principal stores, 
and by Members of the Order. 

fST" Trains leave foot of Market street (Ala- 
meda Ferry) at 8:30 a.m. and 2:30 P.M. 
(August 6.) 



BAY DISTRICT ASSOCIATION. 

Opening of the Fall Season— 18S2- 

Races! Saturday, August 5th, at 2 p.m.— An Extraordi- 
nary Field— 2:40 and 2:26 Classes same day. The wonders in these classes in 
a fierce Btruggle for the supremacy to lead the season. AT 2 P.M. SHARP. 2:40 
Class, Purse 5400, and on the same day 2:26 Class, Purse $500. For Entries and Di- 
vision of Purses see Programmes. National Rules to govern. Club House Balcony 
reserved for Ladies and their Escorts. Second Day, Saturday, Augrust 12th. Admis- 
sion to Grounds and Grand Stands, §1. 
T. W. Hinchhan, Secretary. {Autf. 5.) N. T. SMITH. President. 



Aug. 5, 1882. 



CALIFORNIA ADVERTISER. 



B 



SOCIETY. 



August 3, 1882: Affairs in social circles are almost as dull as the 
akiss have been a greater part of the week just tfone. 

T.» Ik' jtutv, I have been at a oouplt of oharming fUnnar parti**, but, 
having Iwen rvquestetl DOl t>i mention them, I fWl in honor bound to re- 
frain, though aonly tempted. Therefore vraddinjp alone appear to be the 
.»nlv items worthy of record 

Tbn Blits-Emsraoo one came off, acoording to announcement, on the 
2tUb, at Healdahuiy. where the bride has been spending tome monthl 
with hat riatsr, Mrs. warfield, ihe hsrssll being a resident of New Tork, 
She wan married in her traveling dreaB. and the happy eonpla left the 
same day for ft wadding tour tlir.aiL.-li the State, after which they will 
take up their residence in Sun Krancisco. 

On Thursday evenim: just, pretty Lilly Buckbee became- Mm. Robert 
furry, the ceremony which so transformed her taking place at her own 
home on Turk street, her father, the Rev. Mr. Buckbee, performing it. 
I will venture to say that who never looked lovelier than on that occasion 
(as all brides should, hut do not always succeed), her dress of white satin, 
with its long tulle vail, being particularly becoming to her style of 
beauty. 

Rowan in great profusion were used in decorating the house, and the 
huge horseshoe of white blossoms depending from a floral arch iu one 
corner of the back parlor, underneath which the bridal party stood, was 
very much and deservedly admired. 

Another pretty girl, Miss Georgia Hammond, officiated with the bride's 
sister as bridesmaid, and the groom was attended by the bride's two broth- 
ers as groomsmen. The wedding was of quite a private character, and 
witnessed only by a few of the most intimate friends of both families, but 
greatly enjoyed by those who were there, while the prosents were numer- 
ous and handsome. 

To-night another Lilly, Miss Gierke, and Lieut. Townley, of the Navy, 
were married at trie bride's residence on California street. I intended 
going till the last moment, and was then unavoidably prevented, and can- 
not Hnd out anything about it in time for this letter, but that it will be a 
pleasant affair is a foregone conclusion. 

The fair bride is a daughter of the late Henry Gerke, of Gerke Wine 
celebrity, and former owner of a big ranch in Tehama County, now in 
the bauds, if I mistake not, of Leland Stanford. 

Mr. Gerke died only a few months ago, leaving several very pretty 
daughters, all of whom are now married. They had one brother, who 
left for parts unknown several years ago, and whether now living or dead 
I am not aware. 

To-night, also, another hop takes place at the Presidio, the recent 
establishing of the new line of cars thereto proving a great convenience 
for visitors from the city, and of which they do not fail to take advantage 
whenever occasion offers. The hops at the Presidio are always delightful 
gatherings, and most thoroughly enjoyed by all who are lucky enough to 
be invited. 

Army hosts and hostesses seem to understand to perfection the art of 
making one feel instantly at home, which, perhaps, is the secret that the 
McDowell parties are always so pleasant, and great delight is expressed 
at the prospect of their remaining en permenance in 'Frisco. 

Still another fair blossom of our society, and another Lilly, too, is about 
to be lost to us in the person of Miss Lilly Hastings, whose engagement 
to Dr. Costello, of the navy, is one of the last things out. We believe 
the wedding will take place immediately upon the return of the Doctor 
from his present visit East, I am informed, and is likely to be quite an 
event in society circles, the young lady and her sisters, Mrs. E. U. Cath- 
erwood and Mrs. Scott-Keyes, being very popular members of it. 

"Gather ye rosebuds while ye may," sings the poet, but if he refers to 
young men and young women, I most devoutly wish he said young 
men should not pick out all the choicest blossoms, but leave a few for a 
while, at least. 

Mrs. Min. Tompkins has been entertaining some young people at her 
pretty home at San Rafael, the first party she has given in quite a long 
time. Her daughter Emily recently married young Malliard, of that 
place, and they are now, therefore, quite close connections of the Mc- 
Allisters. 

Mrs. Tompkins' Bister, Mrs. Boardman, and family, who have been 
absent in Europe for some months, will arrive here on Monday next on 
their return from abroad. 

The Mays left last week for the East, Dr. Fred and his wife expecting 
to sail for Europe some time this month. 

The former pupils of Madame Zeiss-Dennis will, no doubt, be pleased 
to learn that she is now en route for this city, having come to the conclu- 
sion that, after all, 'Frisco is not such a bad place to live in, and that she 
actually prefers it to " dear, delightful Paris," which can be looked upon 
as a most extraordinary compliment from one who regards herself as a 
Frenchwoman, though in reality a Belgian. However that may be she 
will be welcome, as her beautiful voice has been sadly missed from our 
too scantily supplied concert stage. 

From Monterey I hear that the dearth of men is still being sorely felt, 
which reminds me of a remark I heard made a couple of weeks ago, by a 
trio of pretty young girls just returned from Del Monte, where they have 
been for several weeks. 

It was at a little dance given by Miss B , and on entering the room 

and seeing it tolerably full of the male sex, one of the young ladies above 
mentioned said to the others: " I say, girls, isn't it good to once more see 
men enough to go round ? No more dancing with each other for lack of 
better partners to-night." And a murmur of satisfaction arose from the 
others that was positively refreshing to hear. 

I heard the same girls a little later pitying another of their friends, who 
was still at Monterey, at having nothing better to do than to " buz" old 
Goddefroy on the beach. 

But said Goddefroy needn't mind being called old, as he was young 
once, to which fact he can call any of our " oldest inhabitants " to bear 
witness. 

There are rumors in the air of several very delightful reunions to take 
place in the near future. 

Those who have been at the several watering places long to meet and 
talk it all over, so why not include other friends and let them hear what 
a good time they bad, and the others missed ? So long as these reunions 
do not take the form of those abominations, ladies' lunches, I say the 



more tho merrier, and whenever I am happy enough to bo included 
among the guest-, even if it he but t.» he gregged, be iure you Hhali Q*ax 
all about it. Kf.i.jx. 

A MAGNIFICENT PLACE. 
Taber's well known photographic establishment, No. 8 Montgomery 
street, has just undergone a thorough overhauling and decorating, and u 
now ono of the most perfectly equipped and elegant gallerieB that could 
possibly be constructed. It contains two large operating rooms, a recep- 
tion parlor, a view room where choice photographs of Pacific Coast 
scenery, men, buildings, etc., are on exhibition— and there are eight wait- 
ing and dressing rooms. All of these rooms have just been decorated 
throughout by Geo. W. Clarko & Co., and the result is highly creditable 
to the artistic taste and mechanical skill of those who produced it. The 
ceilings have been frescoed with the most elegant designs, and tho walls 
hung with tasteful patterns of paper. Even in the operating rooms this 
has been done, and the consequence of incurring this unusual expense is 
that those apartments not only present an uncommonly recherche" appear- 
ance, but also that ladies can enter and use them without fear of soiling 
the most expensive aud easily injured dress. In fact, the general appear- 
ance of these operating rooms is similar to that of a drawing-room in a 
well-ap pointed house, and ladies and gentlemen who are having their 
pictures taken, being thus surrounded, feel and look easy and natural, and 
irive the operators a chance to produce accurate photographs. In addition 
Taber's operating rooms are supplied with the most improved cameras and 
a complete outfit of photographic instruments and appliances, and are 
fitted up with beautiful backgrounds, painted to order by Eastern artists 
who are famous in that line of work. Take it all in all, Taber's gallery 
is probably the most complete and elegantly fitted-up of any in the world, 
and it seems little wonder that, with such perfect appliances and delight- 
ful surroundings, he produces such magnificent photographs. 

THE WESTERN LANCET FOR JULY. 
This journal has greatly improved under the editorship of Dr. W. S. 
Whit well. It is no longer the exclusive organ of a clique, and we hope 
that it will obtain the patronage of the medical profession throughout the 
State, and become the instructor of the public on all matters in which 
they have a common interest. Dr. C. Max Richter deserves credit for 
his bold attempt to follow in the footsteps of the celebrated Billroth, of 
Vienna, in excising cancer of the stomach. The condition of the patient 
was not hopeful, and the disease was too far advanced. But the experi- 
ence gained affords hope of better success next time. We are glad to call 
attention to an excellent article on sewer gas and its dangers, which 
should be read by all intelligent people. We cannot forbear quoting the 
five cardinal principles of house drainage: 

1. Complete disconnection of house drain and street sewer. 

2. Ventilating pipe at foot of house drain. 

3. Soil-pipe to be carried above the roof, and not to be used as a con- 
ductor of rain water. 

4. Every fixture to be provided with a trap suitably ventilated. 

5. The whole system of piping inside to be water-tight and gas-tight. 

"The Ralston Pharmacy" is the title of an elegant new drug- 
store just opened on the northwest corner of Post and Powell streets. 
This new establishment is fitted up with everything requisite in a 
perfectly appointed drug-store, and in a style of elegance that is unsur- 
passable. The location of the store — a most important point for those 
who are seeking reliable medicines wherewith to minister to disease — is 
central and easy of access, and it certainly should succeed. 

St. John's Presbyterian Church, Post Street— The Rev. Dr. 

Scott, pastor, will preach Sunday at the usual hours. The public cor- 
dially invited to attend. 

THE flREAT I X L 

MAMMOTH DISPLAY OF 

STRAW SCATS! 



i :x L 



THREE HUNDRED CASES OF 

Men's and Boys' Straw Hats 

TO SELECT FROM. 

Amongst this Spring's Importations are some of the Nobbiest Styles 
of STRAW HATS FOR YOUNG MEN that have ever been offered 
in San FranciBco. Strictly One Price. 

FLAVIN'S" 
GREAT 

Corner of Kearny and Commercial Streets, S. P. 

PAINE'S HOUSEHOLD ART 

.... AND.... 

BRIC-A-BRAC ROOMS, 

25 GEARY STREET, S. F. 

I have purchased the stock and store lately owned by Mr. C. E. 
Locke, and am enabled to offer the choice collection of Floor and Wall 
Cabinets, Music Stands, Writing Desks, Tables, Easels, Pedestals, Fine 
Potteries, Porcelains, Bric-a-Brac, etc., in all of the NEWEST wares 
and of the CHOICEST designs, at EXCEEDINGLY LOW PRICES. 

6^~ Visitors are cordially invited to inspect the Show-rooais, and will be politely 
received, whether intending buyers or not. 
E. PA.ITSTE, ----- J35 Geary Street 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER AND 



Aug. 5, 1882. 



THE FOUNTAIN MAIDEN. 



A Leg-end of that pacific land where garments are worn by none 
save the dead — where the beauty of youth is as the beauty of 
statues of Amber — where through eternal summer even the 
mountains refuse to don a girdle of cloud. 

"Weird Omataianuku! DarkAvaavatheTall! TallOutuutu! Shanow 
the way for us! Tower as the cocoa-palms before us! Bend ye as dreams 
above the slumberers! Make deeper the sleep of the sleepers. Sleep, ye 
crickets of the threshold! — sleep ye never-reposing ants! — sleep, gold-ves- 
ted beetles of the night! Winds, cease ye from whispering! — long gras3, 
still your feeble rustling! — leaves of the palms, be still! — reedsjsf the 
waterways, Bway not! — blue water cease thy amorous lipping of the banks! 
Slumber, ye beams of the house, — ye posts great and small, — ye rafters 
and ridge-poles, — thatchings of grass, — woven work of reeds, — windows 
bam boo -latticed, — doors that squeak like ghosts, — low-glimmering fires of 
Bandal-wood, — slumber ye all! O Omataianuku! Tall Outuutu? Weird 
Avaava! Make shadowy the way for us! Tower as the cocoa-palms be- 
fore us! Bend ye as dreams above the slumberers! Make deeper the 
sleep of the sleepers, — Deeper the sleep of the winds, — Deeper the sleep 
of the waters, — Dimmer the dimness of night! Veil ye the moon with 
your breathings! Make fainter the tires of the stars! In the name of 
the weird ones: — Omataianuku! Outuuturoraa! Ovaavaroroa! Sleep! 
Sleep! Sleep! 



So with the rising of each new moon, was heard the magical song of 
the thieves,— the first night, low as the humming of the wind among the 
cocoa-palms ; — louder and louder each succeeding night, and clearer and 
Bweeter, until the great white face of the full moon flooded the woods with 
light, and made silver pools about the columns of the palms. For the 
magic of the full moon was mightier than the witch-craft of the song ; — 
and the people of Rarotonga slept not. But nf other nights the invisible 
thieves did carry away many cocoa-nuts and taros, and plantains and ba- 
nanas, — despite the snares set for them by the people of Rarotonga. And 
it was observed with terror that cocoa-nuts were removed from the creBts 
of trees so lofty that no human hand might have reached them. 



But the chief Aki, — being one night by the fountain Vaipiki, which 
gushes out from the place of waters that flow below the world, — beheld 
rising up from the water, just as the thin moon looked into it, a youth 
and a girl whiter than the moon herself, naked as fishes, beautiful as 
dreamB. And they began to sing a song at whose sound, Aki, hidden 
among the pandanus leaves, stopped his ears, — the wizard-song — E tira 
Omatuianuku, E tira Outuuturoroaf And the winds were Btilled ; and 
the waves Bank to sleep ; and the palm-leaves ceased to wave ; and the 
song of the crickets ceased. 

Then Aki, devising to capture them, set a great fish net deep within 
the fountain and waited for their return. The vast silence of the night 
deepened, the smoke of the mountain of fire, blood-tinted from below, 
hung motionless in the sky like a giant's plume of feathers. At last the 
winds of the sea began their ghost whisperings among the palm groves ; 
a cricket chirped and a million insect chants responded ; the new moon 
plunged one of her pale horns into the ocean ; the east whitened and 
changed hue like the belly of a shark — the spell was broken, the day was 
breaking. 

And Aki beheld the White ones returning, bearing with them fruits 
and nuts and fragrant herbs. Rising suddenly from his hiding place a- 
mong the leaves, he rushed upon them ; and they leaped into the fountain 
like fishes, leaving their fruits scattered upon the brink. But lo! they 
were caught in the net! 

Then Aki strove to pull the net on shore ; and, being a strong man, he 
easily moved it. But in turning, the male leaped through the opening in 
the net, and flashed like a salmon through the deeps down to the un- 
known abyss of waters below. So that Aki caught the girl only. Vain- 
ly she struggled in the net ; and her moon-white body took opalescent 
gleams, like the body of a beautiful fish in the hands of the captor. Vain- 
ly she wept and pleaded ; and Aki blocked up the bottom of the fountain 
with huge blocks of coral, lest, slipping away from bim, she might disap- 
pear again. But looking upon the strangeness of her beauty he kissed 
her and comforted her ; and she ceased at last to weep. Her eyes were 
large and dark — like a tropical heaven flashed with stars. 



So it came to pass that Aki loved her ; more than his own life he loved 
her ; and the people wondered at her beauty, for light came from her as 
she moved ; and when she swam in the river, her passage was like the 
path of the moon on waters — a quivering column of brightness. Only — 
it was noticed that this luminous beauty waxed and waned contrariwise 
to the waxing and waning of the moon ; her whiteness was whitest at the 
time of the new moon ; it almost ceased to glow when the face of the 
moon was full. And whensoever the new moon roBe she wept silently, bo 
that Aki could not comfort her — even after having taught her the words 
of love in the tongue of his own people — the tongue, many voweled, that 
woos the listener like the mockery of a night-bird's song. 



Thus many years passed away ; and Aki became old. But she seemed 
ever the same ; for the strange race to which she belonged never grow old. 
Then it was noticed that her eyes became deeper and sweeter — wildly, 
weirdly sweet ; and Aki knew that he would become a father in his age. 
Yet she wept and pleaded with him, saying: — 

" Lo! I am not of thy race ; and at last I must leave thee. If thou lov- 
est me Bever this white body of mine, and save our child ; for if it suckle 
me, I must dwell ten years longer in this world to which I do not belong, 
Thou canst not hurt me thus, — for though I seem to die, yet my body 
will live on ; — thou mayst not wound me more than water is wounded by 
axe or spear! For I am of the water and the light, of moonshine and 
wind! And I may not suckle thy child." 



But Aki, fearing that he might lose both her and the child, plead with 
her successfully. And the child was beautiful as a white star ; and she 
nursed it for ten happy years. 



But the ten years having passed, she kissed Aki, and said to him, 
"Alas! I must now leave thee, lest I die utterly; take thou away, there- 
fore, the coral rocks from the fountain." And kissing him once more, Bhe 
vowed to come back again, — so that he complied with her request. She 
would have had him go with her but he could not, being only mortal man. 
Then she passed away in the fountain-deeps, like a flash of light. 



The child grew up very tall and beautiful, but not like his mother, — 
white only like strangers from beyond the sea. In his eyes there was 
nevertheless a strange light, brightest at the time of the new moon, wan- 
ing with its waxing. One night there came a great storm ; the cocoa- 
palms bent like reeds, and a strange voice came with the wind, crying, 
calling! At dawn the white child was gone, — nor did human eyes ever 
behold bim again. 

But Aki lived beyond a hundred years— waiting for the return by the 
Vaipiki fountain, until his hair was whiter than the summer clouds. At 
last the people carried him away, and laid him in his houBe on a bed of 
pandanus leaves ; and all the people watched over him, lest he should 
die. 



It was the night of a new month, and the rising of the new moon. 
Suddenly a low sweet voice was heard, singing the old song that some re- 
membered after the passing of half-a-hundred years. Sweeter and sweet- 
er it grew ; higher rose the moon! The crickets ceased to Bine: ; the cocoa 
palms refused obeisance to the wind. And a heaviness fell upon the 
watchers, — who, with open eyes, could move no limb, utter no voice. 
Then all were aware of a White Woman, — whiter than moonlight, — 
lithe-fashioned as a lake-fish, — gliding between the ranks of the watchers. 
And taking Aki's grey head upon her bright breast, she sang to him and 
kissed him, and stroked his aged face. 



The sun arose ; the watchers awakened. They bent over Aki ; and it 
seemed that Aki slept lightly, But when they called him he answered 
not ;— when they touched him he stirred not. He slept forever! 

— New Orleans Times- Democrat. 

LITERARY NOTES. 
— — The progress of Japanese literature, at least in the increasing num- 
ber of works published, iB noticeable. For laBt year the number was 4,- 
910, as against 3,992 in the previous year. Of these works 545 were po- 
litical ones published by the Government, 255 pertained to jurisprudence, 
25 to political economy, 164 to geography, 267 to medicine, 116 to mathe- 
matics, 17 to chemistry, and 20 to natural history. It was in works of 
history, poetry and drawing that the chief increase took place, but in light 
literature, like novels and fairy tales, the works published numbered only 
193. Newspapers did not get on at all during the year. Out of 167 pub- 
lished in 1880, over 100 had ceased to exist by the end of 1881. Only one 
of them died at the hands of Governmental violence. Many translations 
and adaptions of European and American works were among the total of 
4,910 published in the year. 

— The Modern Argo, a bright, interesting weekly hitherto published 
in Quincy, Illinois, has been moved by its publishers to Kansas City, 
Mo. Kansas City is a railroad centre, enjoying such geographical advan- 
tages, as must result in its becoming one of the most important cities in 
the Union, and the literary excellence of the Modern Argo will, conse- 
quently, in its uew location, have a larger field in which to conquer fame 
and fortune. 

— — Walt Whitman tells, in the Critic of July 15, how he still " Gets 
Around and Takes Notes." His notes this time are mainly astronomical. 
A new volume of prose, which will include a number of his papers first 
printed in the Critic, is to be published soon, 

■ '■■ Active opposition, has done wonders for Boruck's, Spirit of the 
Times. It is now issued as a sixteen-page weekly, and is much improved 
in typographical appearance, and in the class of matter ib contains. 

— Mr. T. H. S. Escott, the new editor of the Fortnightly Review, was 
a scholar of Queen's College, Oxford. He is an excellent classical scholar, 
and has contributed much to the principal reviews. 

— — A new peasant poet has appeared in Russia. His name is N. A. 
Panot, and the Novoe Vremya speaks of his poems in high terms of praise. 

— The August number of Our Little Ones has just been issued. It 
is full of entertaining matter for the children, and is creditably illus- 
trated. 

Messrs. Lightburne & Bros., of 320 Sansome street, San Francisco, 
have just patented a water-filter-nozzle for use in kitchen and other fau- 
cets. The new invention is neat in appearance, and, being heavily plated 
with nickel, cannot corrode or rust. These filtering nozzles are made to 
fit all styles of faucets ; they are simple in construction, easily cleansed 
and very effective. It requires no particular faculty for reading the fu- 
ture to enable one to see that this little invention only requires to be 
known in order to drive the old-time flannel or cloth ba^ {that has served 
the same purpose) into disuse, just as the breech-loading gun has driven 
the old firelock from the field. 

ENTERPRISE MILL AND BUILDING CO., 

Sawing, Planing- and Manufacturing— Doors, Sashes, Blinds and 

Mouldings— Turning, Scroll and Jig Sawing— Counters, 

Bar and Store Fixtures. 

Finishing Work for Buildings on Hand and Made to Order. 

217 to 225 Spear St., and 218 to 226 Stewart St., S. F. 

The largest and oldest established mill on the Pacific Coast. 

D. A. Macdonald, Pree't. R. S. Falconer, Sec'y. W. N. Miller, Supt 

[March 25.] 



Aug. ft, 1882. 



CALIFORNIA ADVKKTISKK 



MRS. BEECHER STOWEB BIRTHDAY. 
At tht> seventieth anniversary of Ida. Beachar Btowvt birthday, 
vblob wan cflebrateil in a very enthvtartto manner at Newtoiivill.- the 
other day, in the ^arden.-t of tin- ai Qovefnoz <»f Massachusetts, Dr. O. 
Wendell Homes read an almoat too enthusiastic poem, from which we 
extract the following stanzas: 

If every tongue that speaks her praise 
For whom I shape my tinkling phrase 

Ware rammooad to the table, 
The vocal chorus that would meet 
Of miuk'liiik' accents, harsh or sweet, 
From every land and tribe, would beat 

The polyglots of Babel. 
Briton and Frenchman, Swede and Dane, 
Turk, Spaniard, Tartar of Ukraine, 

Hidalgo, Cossack, CacU, 
High Dutchman, and Low Dutchman, too, 
The Russian serf, the Polish Jew, 
Arab, Armenian, and Mantchoo, 

Would shout: "We know the lady." 
All through the conflict, up and down, 
Marched Uncle Tom and old John Brown, 

One ghost, one form ideal. 
And which was false and which was true. 
And which was mightier of the two, 
The wisest sybil never knew, 

For both alike were real. 
When Archimedes, long ago, 
Spake out so grandly, "Dos pou sto, 

Give me a place to stand on, 
I'll move your planet for you, now" — 
He little dreamed or fancied how 
The sto at last should find its pou 

For woman's faith to land on. 



FASHION'S VOICE. 

Between the seasons it is not always easy to find fresh styles and 
novel ideas, when Fashion rests in statue quo, and every woman's mind is 
fltled with one thought, which resolves itself into, " What will the Fall 
fashions be? 1 ' Therefore, I shall take a little departure, and introduce 
my lady friends to the consideration of the work-table and its endless 
and beautiful novelties. In the matter of curtains a little lecture (though 
not one a la Caudle) may not be amiss. There is a great tendency to 
ecru in the color of window draperies, pure and snowy white being in a 
measure obsolete. Bunting, plain, and what is called lace bunting is the 
most common material in use. These should be bordered by wide torchou 
lace, or what is termed pillow-slip lace answers as well. Coarse grenadine 
is also much used, with strips of insertion let in between a deep hem and 
the border of lace. Plain Swiss curtains, made very full with simply a 
wide hem, is a very pretty fashion for bed-room windows. They are 
placed close against the window and may be headed by a deep fringe or 
narrow lambrequin of cretonne. Some very rich looking and yet inex- 
pensive lambrequins are made of squares of different cretonnes, well 
chosen, each square being separated from the other by a broad band of 
black velvet, the same running along the base, which is finished by ball 
fringe. The velvet must be sewn on by a row of herring-bone stitch, in 
different colors, the more colors the better, and for a room thus decorated 
the mantle lambrequin must match, as should the tidies. The effect is 
beautiful, and the cost a mere bagatelle. Momie cloth supersedes cre- 
tonne for long curtains, and a fanciful device is to cut handsome flowers 
from a good cretonne pattern, gum them on for a border and work over 
with silk. For bed-rooms scrim may be beautified by turkey red, cut out 
in a pattern forming a border — leaves, for instance. These must be sewed 
on in button-hole Btitch, with soft white cotton, or braided on, as to 
choice. 

Tidies and small tablecloths are often seen made of Turkish toweling, 
very dark in color, which are ornated with flowery patterns worked in 
arrasene; they are also decorated with esthetic figures, Japanes caprices, 
and comical devices of all sorts. Another effective tidy is made of altern- 
ate slips of toweling and plush, or satin. On the toweling is worked a 
pattern in crewels or floss (the former is the most adaptable). The velvet 
or satin strips may or may not be embroidered; the effect is better plain, 
and when the strips are joined, a rich feather stich, in wool or coarse silk, 
should be worked over to hide the seam. For dinner-tables some novel 
conceits appear. Some are made of Bolton sheeting, patterns in etching, 
being worked before each plate, and the corners finished by heavy scrolls. 
The cloth requires to be fringed with a heavy fringe. The effect is re- 
markably telling. 

Mosaic embroidery is becoming universal: thus cloth is taken for a 
ground work and patterns cutof shaded plush are sewed on with any stitch 
approved of. The more colors used the more beautiful the work will be, 
and for piano covers, mantel lambrequins and screens, nothing can be 
more effective. The materials most in vogue for the present fancy work, 
are momie-cloth linen, crash ulda canvas and pongee silk; the latter is 
light and elegant for silk embroidered work and washes beautifully. A 
beautiful imitation of Indian work can be produced by obtaining a piece 
of ecru alpaca, Bay for a small table cloth. Cut nondescript figures 
from velvet, silk, cloth, or any scraps you have, place them on at even dis- 
tances to form a border and sew them lightly over with silk; the result is a 
mosaic pattern rich and rare; gold thread to sew on with improves the 
caprice. Many ladies are now painting borders on silk and satin table 
covers. It is a good plan to make the centre of your cover of cloth, and 
paint the border on a wide satin ribbon, which you can lay on and stitch 
down with the machine. 

Doyleys are very pretty, made of thick white jean or coutille, and on 
the center of each an etching in indelible ink, or a group of black figures 
in the same, or Indian silk. I recommend the former, as it washes. 
There is another form of doyley, made on white pique* with figures in 
etching stitch worked in indelible red cotton. 

I think I have discoursed all I can for this day ; therefore, ladies, until 
next week, adieu. Silver Pen. 



BANK8. 



THE BANK OF CALIFORNIA, SAN FRANCISCO. 

Capital $3,000,000. 

WM.AI.VOKI> Prc.ltleiit. 

THOMAS IIHOW N. Caabler | B. IN I BRAT, Jr., A»» «. OMBlM 

AoiflTfl : 

New York, Atroncv of Iho Bank of Calfomla ; Boston, Tromont National Bank , 
ChiMRii, Union Notional Bank ; St. Louia, Boatman'. Saving Bank J Now Zealand, 
the Bonk of New Zealand. Correspondent In London. McMra. N. M. Rothschild & 
Sons. Correspondents In India. China. Japan and Australia, the Oriental Bank Cor- 
poration. 

Tho Bank has Agencies at Virginia City, and Correspondents in all the princi- 
pal Mining Districts and Interior Towns of tho Pacific Coast. 

Letters of Credit iBsuod, availahlo in all parts of tho world. Draw direct on Lon- 
don, Duhlin, Paris, Berlin, Bremen, Hamburg, Frankfort-on-tho-Main, Antwerp, 
Amsterdnm, St. Petersburg!], Copenhagen, Stockholm, Christiana, Locarno, Mel- 
bourne. Sydney. Auckland. Hongkong, Shanghai, Yokohama. Nov. 4. 

BANK OF BRITISH COLUMBIA. 

Incorporated by Royal Charter.— -Capital paid up, 81,800,* 
000, with power to increase to $10,000,000. Southeast corner California and San- 
Borne streets. Head Office— 28 CnrnliilJ, London. Branches— Portland, Oregon; Vic- 
toria, New Westminster and Cariboo, British Columbia. 

This Bank transacts a General Banking Business. Accounts opened subject to Chock 
and Special Deposits received. Commercial Credits granted available in al parte of 
the world. Approved Bills discounted and advances made on good collateral security. 
Draws direct at current rates upon its Head Office and Branches, and upon its Agents 
as follows : 

New York, Chicago and Canada— Bank of Montreal ; Liverpool— North and South 
Wales Bank; Scotland —British Linen Company; Ireland— Bank of Ireland ; Mex- 
ico and South America— London Bank of Mexico and South America ; China and 
Japan— Chartered Bank of India, Australia and China, and Oriental Bank ; Australia 
and New Zealand— Bank of Australasia, Commercial Banking Company of Sydney, 
English, Scottish and Australian Chartered Bank, and Colonial Bank, Panama. 

May 18. FREDERICK TOWNSBNP, Manager. 

FIRST NATIONAL GOLD BANK OF SAN FRANCISCO, CAL. 

Paid np Capital 81,500,000, Gold. President, B. C. Wool- 
worth Vice-President, D. Callaghan ; Cashier, E. D. Morgan. 

Directors :— R. C. Woolworth, D. Callaghan. C. G. Hooker, George A. Low, Peter 
Donahue, Isaac Wormser, James Phelan, James Moffltt, N. Van Bergen. 

Correspondents— Loudon : Baring Bros. & Co. Bank of Montreal, No. 9 Birchin 
Lane, Lombard street. Dublin : Provincial Bank of Ireland. Hamburg : Hesse, 
Neuman&Co. Paris: Hottinguer&Co. NewYork: National Bank of Commerce. Bos- 
ton : Blackstone National Bank. Chicago : First National Bank. This Bank is pre- 
pared to transact a general Banking business. Deposits in Gold, Silver and Currency 
received subject to check or on special deposit. Exchange for sale on the principal 
cities of the United States, Great Britain, Ireland and the Continent. Commercia 
Credits issued available iu Europe, chii.a and Japan. Collections attended to and 
prompt returns made at the lowest market rates of Exchange. Jan. 19. 



LONDON AND SAN FRANCISCO BANK, LIMITED. 

Capital, S2.100.O0O. 

San Francisco Office, 424 California street; London Office, 
22 Old Broad street. Portland Branch, AinBWOrth's Building. Manager, 
ARTHUR SCRIVENER; Assistant Manager, WILLIAM STEEL. London Bankers, 
Bank of England and London Joint Stock Bank; New York, Drexel, Morgan & 
Co. ; Boston, Third National Bank. This Bank is prepared to transact all kinds 
of General Banking and Exchange Business in London and San Francisco, and 
between said cities and all parts of the world. Oct. 9. 

THE NEVADA BANK OF SAN FRANCISCO. 

Capital Paid TJ j) $3,000,000. 

Reserve, TJ. S. Bonds 4,000,000. 

Agency at New York, 62 Wall street. 
Agency at Virginia, Nev. 

Buys and sells Exchange and Telegraphic Transfers. Issues Commercial and Trav- 
elers' Credits. This Bank has special facilities for dealing in Bullion. Nov. 8. 

THE ANGLO-CALIFORNIAN BANK, LIMITED. 

N.E. Cor. Sansome and Pine Streets* 

London Office, 3 Angel Court ; New York Agents, J. W. Sel- 
igman & Co., 21 Broad street. Authorized Capital Stock, 86,000,000. Will re- 
ceive TJeposits, open Accounts, make Collections, buy and sell Exchange and Bullion, 
loan Money, and issue Letters of Credit available throughout the world. 

FRED. F. LOW, IGN. STEINHART, Managers. 
P. N. LitfiEKTHAL, Cashier. Sept. 13. 

SECURITY SAVINGS BANK. 

GUARANTEE CAPITA!., 9300,000. 

Officers: Vice-President, Jerome Lincoln; Secretary, W. 
S. Jones ; Attorney, Sidney V. Smith. Loans made on Real Estate and other 
Approved Securities. Office : No. 215 Sansome street, San Francisco. Oct. 14. 

THE GERMAN SAVINGS AND LOAN SOCIETY. 

Deutsche Spar and Lelhbank, No 526 Callfornlastreet,San 
Francisco. Officers : President, L. GOTTIG. Board of Directors. — Fred. 
Roeding, Chas. Kohler, Edw. Kruse, George H. Eggers, N. Van Bergen, H. L. Simon, 
Peter SpreckelB, Ign. Steinhart. Secretary, GEO. LETTE ; Attorney, JOHN R. 
JARBOE. May 18. 

SELBY SMELTING AND LEAD COMPANY, 

416 Montgomery Street San. Francisco. 

Gold and Silver Refinery and Assay Office. 

Highest Prices Paid for Gold, Silver and Lead Ores and Sulphureta. Manufac- 
turers of BLUESTONE. Also, Lead Pipe, Sheet Lead, Shot, etc. This Company 
has the best facilities on the Coast for working GOLD, SILVER and LEAD in their 
various forms. 

June 18. PRENTISS SELBY, Superintendent. 



TO LEASE, 



For a long .erra-Lol on north side of Townsend street, 
between Fourth and Fifth, 183 4-12 feet easterly from Fifth. Size 91 8-12 feet 
by 120 feet. Apply to JOHN ROACH, 

April 1. 219 Montgomery street. 

a week in your own town . Terms and $5 outfit free. 

AddresB H. Hallett & Co., Portland, Maine. 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER AND 



Aug. 5, 1882. 



"PLEASURE'S WAND." 

" We Obey no Wand bnt Pleasure '«."— 3fom Moore. 

Theatrically this town has been very dull of late, and lobby- loungers 
and men-abuut-town generally have been at a loss to know what to do 
with the early part of their evenings. There are only two legitimate 
theatres open, and they are both given over to special entertainments 
that are everything but legitimate. Burnt cork holds sway at the Cali- 
fornia, and at the Baldwin acrobatics and grotesque antics reign Bupreme. 
At the Tivoli Der Freischutz is still on the bills and will run the week out. 
On Monday, Coquelicot, an operetta by Varney, will be produced, with 
Urban in the title role. At the Winter Garden there is a novelty, and 
this has been a redeeming feature of the week's dulluess. Simona, orthelnn- 
keepers Daughter, is bright and lively in music and action, and is rendered 
in the usual effective style of this place of amusement. I have witnessed 
the Hanlons' performance several times, and have enjoyed myself every 
time. I have laughed heartily, principally at the droll actions and ex- 
cessively funny manner of humble Mr. R. Jones. This performer, who 
to me is the most amusing one of them all, turns out to be the prop- 
erty-man of the troupe. One of the HanlonB (Alfred) has been sick 
since the troupe arrived here, and this accounts to some extent for the 
confusion among the names on the programme. Kate Foley is a re- 
markably pretty little body, who is to be sincerely pitied for the un- 
grateful part she has to play. Sinclair, who plays " Dwindled own," is a 
fair comedian. The audiences have fallen off considerably, a fact mostly 
due, I think, to the bad, very bad, management " in front," The manage- 
ment of the seats, and the peculiar schedule of prices established, are nov- 
elties that are not to the taste of onr public. I have seen the Tivoli 
Freischutz several times, and have got enough of that. The performance 
has pleased the patrons of this popular resort immensely. When one has the 
substantial comforts of food, drink and tobacco, one is apt to be but very 
slightly critical. The " Wolf's Glen " act was a big success — not as an op- 
eratic scene, with spectacular adjuucts, but as apyrotechnicaldsiplay, with 

musical accompaniment. The minstrels are a good show to see once a 

year ! There is lots of talent in the company, but it is not developed in 
new or novel ways. Everything on the programme is old and hack- 
neyed, and, besides, the repertoire of this large company seemB to be very 
limited. Leon is undeniably the star of the troupe. He is simply inim- 
itable in his specialty. 

* * • * * 

Next week things will be brighter, for a first-class company from the 
Union Square Theatre will appear. They have studied a list of plays 
that ought to draw the better class of our amusement seekers. The 
Banker's Daughter has never been given here in its proper shape. A man- 
gled version was produced at the Baldwin some years ago, but it simply 
served to make us regret that we were deprived of the pleasure of seeing 
the play as it ought to be played. Daniel Rochat was also produced at the 
same theatre last year, I believe, but, barring a very able rendition of the 
hero's part by Joe Grismer, was noticeable only for the very bad way in 
which it was acted. Odette is entirely new to us. And there are other 
plays to be produced. Last, and most decidedly least, The Light's o" Lon- 
don— one of the modern idiotic melodramas. The company in a strong 
one. There is Sara Jewett, knowc to all theatre-goers by name; dear, 
cunning little Maud Harrison, whom we all like and admire; pretty 
Eleanor Carey, a great favorite here, and four or five other actresses. 
Then there is De Belleville, who commenced his American stage career 
in this city some time ago, and who has fully substantiated the good opin- 
ion we then formed of his talent and ability ; J. E. Whiting, a well- 
known actor; J. H. Stoddart, who made a hit on his former visit; Wal- 
den Ramsey, who was such an effective Pierre in a Two Orphans revival 
at the Baldwin at that time; and Owen Fawcett and John Farselle, who 
are two of the most prominent members of this standard company, and 
have been so since its organization, and besides all this talent three or four 
more clever fellows for minor parts. Surely such a collection should do 

well, and it will. 

# * * # * # * 

The trip of this company has a decidedly family look to it. A regular 
Summer jaunt. Several of the gentlemen have their wives with them, 
and there is quite a little assemblage of maids and valets. 

* » * # * * 

Musical matters have profited by the dullness in dramatic matters, and 
the concerts of the Mendelssohn Quintette Club have been well attended. 
The love for music is almost universal, but, unfortunately for the expo- 
nents of its highest forms, the masses are not educated up to an apprecia- 
tion of purely classical compositions. There are many who can only find 
enjoyment in the simple church hymns and the trashy ballads of the day. 
How few there are who can relish anything above a Strauss waltz or an 
Offenbach chorus. If there is any way to educate all these people up to 
an enjoyment of the works of Bach, Handel, Haydn, Mozart, Beethoven, 
Schubert, etc., etc., it is hy their rendition by thorough musicians, with 
all the skill that study will bring, and with the con arnore of true genius. 
And I think that the Mendelssohn Club possess these requirements. Next 
season they will travel with Miss Christine Nilsson, and it is to be hoped 
that they will again visit us. 

Talking of music reminds me of an interesting article I read some time 
ago in an Eastern exchange, which contrasted the Italian school, of which 
Patti is the supreme exponent, and the German school, of which Materna 
is probably the high priestess. The writer argues that lyric music is as 
much out of place on the operatic stage as lyric poetry on the dramatic 
stage. It has kept its place so long because it is easier to appreciate and 
to follow than harmony, and it has been cultivated by the Italians on 
account of their mental indolence. I agree with the writer. But we have 
outlived this phase of art development. The decline of Italian opera 
everywhere is a proof of this. In Berlin and Vienna Italian opera was a 
failure last year. In Paris French composers occupy the operatic stage. 
In Italy itself lyric operas fail, while the German operas are successfully 
produced, and the native musicians give to their musical thoughts a Ger- 
man form. A full and definite expression can only be given to our emo- 
tions by harmony with its alternation of moods, of concords and discords, 
of gay or sombre instrumental color. Different styles of singing are 
necessarily required by the two schools. Modern dramatic and declama- 
tory music demands a totally different vocal method, which in itself is i 
quite as natural as the Italian style, being simply an artistic elaboration I 



of the natural emotional cadences of the human voice in speech. The 
difference between lyric and dramatic opera is the difference between mere 
virtuosity and real art. Italian arias written to enable a singer to display 
vocal technique are mere unhealthy hot-house flowers, while the melodies 
of the modern school have their roots in the healthy soil in which the 
song and dance rythms of the people grow. 

* * * • * 

Wagner'B Parsifal has at last been produced, and, by all accounts, is a 
wonderful composition. It is rather aggravating to be away from all 
these musical feasts. 

***** 

Next week there will be quite a change in the executive force of the 
California. Fred W. Bert takes McConnell's place, McC. going to Brook- 
lyn. Shattuck, the Treasurer, goes also in the same direction, and will 
be succeeded by Robert Fitzgerald, an old acquaintance. Young Eddie 
Kilday remains as assistant Treasurer. This young man has always been 
popular. Years ago, as the editor of the Peanut, an amateur journal, 
then as the newsboy in the Streets of New York, and now as a polite and 
obliging occupant of the box office of the California Theatre.^— 
Advance agents are natives of Gaul !^— Eben Plympton has been 
catching it in London. The Morning Post remarks of him: "The gen- 
tleman who tried to play 'De Mauprat' has mistaken his vocation."-^— 
Rumor says that Comley and Barton will not be known again as opera 
managers. ^— Song-and-dance men are easily recognized by their paren- 
thetical legs.-— In New York they say that Sam Wetherill is disconso- 
late over the loss of his wife, who is out here with the Union Square Co. 
Ha! ha!^— The coming comediennes — Minnie Maddern, Marion Elmore, 
Jennie Yeamans, Lizzie May Ulmer; waning ones— Maggie Mitchell and 
Lotta; likely to coruscate for some time — Annie Pixley.— ~Fred Warde 
has been quite successful as a Btar. Glad of it!— — Remenyi ib in New 
York, enjoying himself. —In Ristori's support, in her performances of 
" Lady Macbeth," in London, are two well-known actors — George Rig- 
nold and Jack Barnes, who appear respectively as "Macbeth" and "Mac- 
duff." The other day, they carried the realism of the deadly struggle to 
such an extent that Rignold received a stab between the ribs, and is now 
laid up.-^Billy Rice, whose real name is Pearl, recently lost his mother, 
Mrs. Elizabeth Pearl Baur, who died in New York at the age of fifty- 
seven. Billy's father, William Pearl, was a well-known Deputy 
Sheriff of Albany, and he died when the present successful 
negro minstrel was eight years of age. His mother then married Mr. 
Joseph Baur, a merchant— The managers of Prussian theatres are 
compelled by law to use sheet tin for scenery. This material is fire-proof, 
and is at once cheaper and more durable than canvas.— ^Did it ever 
strike you how few singers possess the faculty of singing a simple ballad 
with touching expression ?^— The remains of George Conly, the basso, 
were buried in Philadelphia with Masonic honors.^— At the German 
Singers' Festival, to be held in Hamburg this month, there will be over 
ten thousand singers from all parts of Germany present.— —Zola is 
dramatizing his " Le Cure". "^— Maud Granger has been occupying the 
attention of the Eastern dramatic press lately to a great extent. It was 
first announced that she was very ill, destitute, forlorn and helpless. It 
now turns out that all this was false. These contradictory stories have 
given rise to a good deal of comment, most of which has been decidedly 
uncharitable and uncomplimentary to the actress in question. She is a 
handsome and attractive woman, and her advent on the stage was but a 
promotion from the ranks of the army of Queen Anonyma. But it strikes 
me that this is no one's business but her own.^— In an article pitching 
into the Hanlons, a contemporary remarks that, unfortunately for the 
success of the entertainment, there is in the American public a strong 
vein of common-sense, which demands plausibility and probability, 
etc., in its theatricals. How about the London melodramas, which have 
captured the same public? Beauclebc. 

~~~~~ BALDWIN THEATRE. 

HOi\DAT Aligns! 7th, 

POSITIVELT LAST WEEK 

OF 

THE HAIVLONS, 

Entire Change of Programme [ Everything New 1 
Tbe Grand Comic Pantomime, Entitled, 

THE MISCHIEVOUS PIERROTS! 

The Evening's Entertainment will Commence with the Comedy of 
Micky White! 

WINTER GARDEN, 

Stockton street, between Post and Sntter streets.— stahl A 
Manet. Proprietors. Great BUccess of the Winter Garden Opera Company 
in the new Comic Romantic Opera, 

Simona ! 

This (Saturday) evening, August 5th, and every evening until further notice. All 
the Solos. Duets and Concerted Pieces received with double and treble encores. 
Don't fail to see the Shadow Dauce by M'lle Bertha fc^" Notick.— The Curtain 
will rise Sunday evenin g at 7:30 o'clock. August 5. 

TIVOLI OPERA HOUSE, 

Eddy street, near Market. --HrelluK Bros., Proprietors. 
Last Week of the Great Success, C. M Von Weber's Grand Romantic Opera, 
Der Freischutz ! 

or, THE SEVEN CHARMED BULLETS. This Evening: SUSS LOUISE LESTER 
as "Agathe;" MR. F. URBAN as " Max." Next Week, COQUEL1COT, an Eutirely 
New Comic Opera, for the first time iu America. August 5. 

SEASIDE GARDEN! 

Presidio. Terminus of Union-street Cable Road. EVERY 
WEDNESDAY, SATURDAY and SUNDAY, GRAND GALA CONCERT by 
the Full United States Presidio Band, of 24 Pieces. Commencing at 12 «. Carl 
Kreyer, Director. Admission, FREE. July 29. 

DANCING ACADEMY, " 

IK RED MEN'S BUILDING, 
No. 330 Post Street Opposite Union Square. 

PROF. O. A. LUNT respectfully announces that his new Academy, No. 320 Post 
street, is now open for Juvenile and Evening Classes. Office Hours, for Terms, etc., 
10 a.m. to 12 si., and 1 to 5 p.m. Oct. 22. 



Aug. 6, 1882. 



CALIFORNIA ADVKKTISKK. 



SPORTING ITEMS. 



Thia afternoon, at the Bay District lUoa Track, the Bay District As- 
■ociatina will boU the tintt «>f the Fall trotting ItOM The programme 
of the day Incbldai the 2^0 and 2:96 clasHes, anil, from the appear ■■■ 
the entry list which follow**, should produce some excellent sport: 2:40 
class, purse $400, single heats, 3 in 5, in harness; J2.V) ti tirat, $100 to 
sec^'Dil, and $50 to third horse. P, Farrell names b. h. Vandorlynn, M. 
RolUna names Kg. Freest • me, A. B. Cooper names s. h. Frank Moscow. 
2:25 class, purse $500, mile heats. 3 in 5, in harness; $350 to first, $100 to 
second and $50 to third horse, L. J. Kose names b. s. Del Sur, I,. H. 
Titus names br.m. Echora, Chas. \V. Welby names ch. r. Starr Kim;, J. 
A. ttolilsmith names s. m. Sweetness, Johu Hughes names b. g. < '.iir >, 
Jackson Cochran names ch. g. Ashley. It does not always happen that 
the best horse wins a trotting race, and I know that at least one horse in 
the above was engaged in questionable practices last season, but this As- 
sociation is very strict, and as the crooked work is generally kept for the 
latter part of the circuit, when the horses have all been tired out, it is 
only fair to suppose that the best horses will win this afternoon. P. Far- 
rell s entry in the 2:10 class is a green horse, said to belong to Ed. Stokes, 
of Fiak fame. It has shown low down in the thirties in private trials, 
and, barring accidents, should be able to win with ease. I think the 2:25 
class will prove a surprise party to a good many people. Welby's entry, 
Starr King, has been tried and tried in practice, until he has shown bet- 
ter than 2:2"2. Many people know of that trial, and to-day (Friday) it 
looks to me as if he would be a red-hot favorite. He has a soft spot in 
his heart, and if hard pushed is liable to "duff" after a second heat, or 
perhaps sooner. Goldsmith's entry, Sweetness, can make him trot his 
very best, and is as likely as not to break his heart. I do not think that 
King will win, in spite of his fast trial. Welby is not a first-class driver, 
and though he may be able to speed his horse in private, in a tight race 
he has no show with Goldsmith, even if his horse is five seconds the faster 
of the two. Either Ashley or Echora are liable to get in if the heats 
happen to be much split up. I know the risk of hazarding conjectures at 
the start of the season, and also know how easily one can be deceived, 
but for all that advise the readers of the News Letter to be careful, and 
not invest more money in Starr King than they can well afford to lose. I 
suppose that old, old two-bit bar swindle will prevail to-day, and the only 
way to beat it appears for visitors to the track to provide themselves with 
pocket flasks and well-filled cigar cases before they start. 

* * • » * 

Owen Judge has definitely announced his retirement from the prize 
ring. This announcement has elevated his good sense about 75 per cent. 
in my estimation, but I wish, for the sake of the accuracy of history, 
Judge would also announce at what time he ever appeared as a principal 
in a prize fight. My impression is that, with the exception of a few glove 
matches, Judge is positively unknown as a pugilist. 

» » # * * 

Last Sunday, at San Bruno, the Cosmopolitan Club team defeated the 
California Club team in the match for the championship and a diamond 
medal, with the handsome score of 145 kills against 136, out of 180 birds 
shot at by each team. The rules were 15 men on each side, 12 birds each, 
21 yards rise, 80 yards boundary, plunge traps. The match was very 
closely contested up to the tenth round, when the California team went 
all to pieces. Crittenden Robinson made a bad miss, and eight more of 
the team followed his example. Of all the thirty contestants, every one 
of whom were picked shots, Robert Tallant was the only one who made 
a clean score; and it is only fair to say that he made it under as great dif- 
ficulties as fell to the lot of any of the shooters. He shot very steadily, 
held on to all his birds and did not depend upon the skill of a retriever to 
secure his birds. At the conclusion of the match, his Club properly 
awarded to him the honor of carrying the medal, which, having thrice 
been won by the Cosmopolitan Club, is now its personal property. A 
feature of the match was the number of birds that died just out of bounds. 
The Cosmopolitans lost 5 in this way, and the Californians 11. Follow- 
ing is the score of both teams : Cosmopolitan team — F. Maskey 11, J. 
Kelly 10, J. Ferguson 9, Wm. Rover 9, C. H. Graham 10, G. Golcher 9, 
A. Higgins 9, F. Johnson 11, F. H. Putzman 10, P. Funcke 9, R. Liddle 
9, R. Tallant 12, J. Browell 9, W. H. Card 8, M. Ault 10— total, 145. 
California team— C. Robinson 11, G. W. Roche 9, C. W. Downey 10, 
A. E. Burbank 7, H. Spencer 11, H. Parker 7, P. E. Walsh 10, W. Bo- 
gart 7, E. W. Hays 9, J. Kerrigan 11, D. Berwick 9, R. Ellon 9, S. E. 
Knowles 8, T. A. Pearson 8, J. H. Jellett 10— total 136. 

The prospects for a first-class rowing regatta on Thanksgiving Day are 
first-class, the offer of a silver cup for a four-oared shell race having given 
quite a fresh impetus to rowing.— Petersen and Stevenson are still doing 
a good deal of dry -land rowing, but no match has been made as yet.— — 
Murphy wants a wherry race with Tom Flynn, and is very likely to be 
accommodated.— -Griffin and Watkins will not race. Reason — Griffin 
thinks Watkins too good a man for him at Long Bridge, and Watkins 
feels that he is not the equal of Griffin at Saucelito. — — London sport- 
ing papers all claim that the Hillsdale crew are duffers, but London 
oarsmen have so little confidence in the aforesaid journals that they are 
all afraid to let the Hillsdales row in their regattas. Practice is stronger 
than precept, therefore one may safely conclude that if the Hillsdales 
are duffers the London crews are also duffers, only more so. — About the 
only difference nowadays between amateur and professional oarsmen ap- 
pears to be that the former are afraid to row but are not afraid to bet, 
while the latter are afraid to bet but are not afraid to row. 

****** 

Thia afternoon, at 3:15 P.M., Robt. Haley will attempt to equal or break 
the 100-yard amateur record —10 seconds. The Olympic Athletic Club offer a 
gold medal if the feat is performed, so the attempt will be made to rule. The 
last time Haley ran he was in poor fix, yet his time was 10^, and a trifle 
better than 10| in the final heat. In view of the importance of the event, 
I would suggest to the Olympic Club that they secure the services of a 
couple of independent dockers in addition to their own selections. This 
suggestion carries no insinuation, and I hope it will be so understood. 

Kxug Champagne, from Reims, France. — Private Cuvee in quarts 
and pints. Shield— Krug — in quarts and pints ; Premiere Qualite, in 
quarts and pints. For sale by Hellmann Bros. & Co. , corner Front and 
Jackson streets. 



PROMPT PAYMENT. 

San FbamCISOO, July 27, 1882. 
To April t F.'fuit'ihl. Lifv duurance So* Coatt: 

Dbab Bib Ynureoi the 27th, with check for 98,144, in payment of 
Mr. T. A. Sanchez' policy. No, 220.447, f'-r 95,000, received. Ho being 
only -' ywui Insured, and the policy unignnd t<> us, it Bpeaks well for 
the promptness with which the Company does buiinesB, it being but fif- 
teen days since wo handed you the proofs of: death. It given ni great 
pleasure to recommend the EquiuMo, above all other Companion, to 
those who contemplate insuring their lives. 

We regain, respectfully yours, 

Aug. 5. HELLMAN, HASS A CO. 



SEVENTEENTH INDUSTRIAL EXHIBITION 

OK TUB 

MECHANICS' INSTITUTE 

WILL OPEN TO TIIK PUBLIC ON 
H I.SDAV August 15. 1882, 

At the NEW PAVILION, 

LA-RKIN, HAYES, POLK AND QKOVE STREETS, 
And Continue until Srptrmber 16th, 
PREMIUMS of Gold, Silver and Bronze Medals, Diplomas and Cash will be award- 
ed to meritorious exhibits in Art, Manufactures and Natural Products. Full infor- 
mation will be given or Bent by applying at the Office, 27 Post Btrcet. 

P. B. CORNWALL, President. 
J. H. CULVER. Secretary. 
Aug. 5. J. H. G1LMORE, Superinten dent. 

HASTINGS COLLEGE OF THE LAW. 

The Next Term will Open on 
THURSDAY August 10Mb, 

.... AT THE .... 

PIONEER HALL, SAN FRANCISCO. 

Examination of applicants to the Middle Class, and all re-exami nations, 

will take place on 

TUESDAY, August 8th, at 9 O'Clock A.M. 

Examination of applicants for admission to the Junior Class will be held on 

August Oth and JOth, at 9 O'Cloch A.M. 

All new applicants should give their names to the 

Registrar Office No. 636 Clay Street- 

Aug. 5. C. P. HASTINGS, Reg istrar. 

COLLEGE OF NOTRE DAME 

FOR YOUNG LADIES. 
Conducted by the Sisters of Notre Dame, San Jose* 

This Institution will Resume Studies on 
TUESDAY August 1, 1882. 

The course of instruction embraces all the branches necessary to the acquisition 
of a Bolid and refined education. TERMS: Tuition, board, washing and bedding per 
quarter, $75. Music (vocal and instrumental), drawing, painting and private elo- 
cution lessons form extra charges. For further particulars apply to the 

Aug. 5. SISTER SUPERIOR. 



TRANSATLANTIC FIRE INSURANCE CO., 

OF HAMBURG. 
/ Capital, 81,500,000, U. S. Gold Coin. Losses paid in Gold 

\j Coin immediately after Adjustment. This Corporation holds contracts of six- 
teen other European Insurance Companies, re-insuring by far the greater part of 
every risk, as soon as accepted in our office. The combined subscribed Capital which 
our policies therefore offer to the public amounts to $26,900,000, U. S. Gold 
Coin, of which $7,650,000 is paid up, besides the always available Reserve Funds. 
GEO. MARCUS & CO., 304 California street. S. F., 
Aug. 5. General Agents for Pacific Coast. 



PROPOSALS 

Will be received for tbe purchase of the following arti- 
cles at the STATE JUTE MILL, San Queutin: 
GKAIN SACKS-22x36, 20x36, 24x40. Lots In from 1,000 to 
5,000. 

BEAN BAGS-15x30. 

WOOL BAGS-Standard Weight. 
FLEECE TWINE. 
HOP CLOTH-From 1,000 to 5.000 yards. 
Samples of which will be sent when desired, and be on exhibition at the Froduc 
Exchange, San Francisco. 

Proposals will be opened weekly, and the award given to the highest bidder. 
Goods to be delivered on the wharf at San Francisco. 
.... also .... 
For BRICK Delivered at Wharf, San Guentln. 
Address proposals: J. P. AMES, Warden San Quentiu Prison. 

By order of Board State Prison Directors, 
J. V. Ellis, Clerk. fjuly 29.] G. W. SCHELL, President. 



WILLIAM T. COLEMAN & CO., 

MEMBERS OF THE 

PRODUCE EXCHANGE, 

123 it ml 125 Market Street, Sail Francisco. 

[July 29.] - 

SANTA CRUZ FURNISHED HOUSES, 

From 825 Per Month, in the Best Locations* 
EXCHANGE AND M ART Santa Cruz, Cal. 

No. 2 of the new Land Journal, of Santa Cruz county, containing full details of 
Real Estate for sale, soil, climate, productions, etc., FREE BY MAIL. May 27. 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER AND 



Aug. 5, 1882 




"The World," the Flesh, and the Devil. 

[By a Truthful Penman.] 

The Land Corporation of Ireland, of which the object is to ad- 
vance money to Irish landlords to enable them to maintain themselves 
against the Land League, and in certain cases to take over on lease and 
manage the properties, and collect the rents, promises to be a very con- 
siderable success. Of the £150,000 subscriptions proposed to be raised in 
the first instance, £146,000 are already subscribed. Lord Fitz William has 
promised £3,000 ; the Duke of Devonshire, £2,000 ; the Duke of Aber- 
corn, £1,000 ; Lord Bath, £1,500 ; Mr. Kavanagh, £1,500 ; Lord London- 
derry, £1,000 ; Lord Waterford, £2,000 ; and numbers of others, sums 
varying from £100 to £500 each. This looks like business.— Vanity Fair. 
■—•Her Majesty appreciated the inconsistency of military medical officers 
saluting with drawn swords at reviews, and her opinions frankly ex- 
pressed to the Duke of Cambridge led to the order that they should only 
Balute with the hand. The Queen also thinks that their uniforms should 
not at all resemble those of combatant officers, and to secure for the med- 
ical profession greater freedom from danger in the discharge ©f then- 
humane duties on a battle-field, proposals are under consideration to in- 
vite the European Powers to adopt a distinct international uniform. If 
all army doctors, whatever their nationality, were attired alike, an enemy 
would see at a glance that they were non-combatant, but with a view to 
making the uniform inviolable, a rule must, it is admitted, be made that 
any one who endangers the life or maltreats a doctor or any of his staff 
shall be punished by death. These proposals are steps in the right di- 
rection. ^—Colonel Chambers, immediately on learning through the 
press of the desire of the Roman civic authorities to obtain Garibaldi's 
sword, addressed a letter to the Ambassador, General Menabrea, placing 
at the disposal of the Italian nation, not only the sword worn by the 
great Italian patriot throughout all his campaigns, and presented to Colo- 
nel Chambers on the breaking up of the staff after the campaign of 1866, 
at the close of that war, but also the standard presented to Garibaldi 
when Dictator at Monte Video, and the blood-stained blanket in which 
the General was carried off the battle-field after Aspromonte.— A 
young nobleman in a frightful railway accident missed his valet. 
One of the guards came up to him and said ; " My Lord, we have found 
your servant, but he is cut in two." "Aw, is he?" said the young man, 
with a Dundreary drawl, but with a trace of anxiety depicted on his 
countenance, "will you be kind enough to see in which half he has got 
the key of my carpet bag ?"^— M. Falguiere, a sculptor, has been author- 
ized to temporarily erect a rough model of a composition of allegorical 
figures representing the triumph of Liberal and progressive France, upon 
the Bummit of the Arc de Triomphe, in Paris. The figures, which are 
three or four times as large as life, are now being erected. Should the 
design be accepted by the Minister of Fine Arts it will be cast in bronze, 
and definitely crown the monument.— —It seem a raid has been made 
upon the Kia Tsu JEn, a Buddhist nunnery inside the West Gate of the 
native City of Shanghai, Two of the ladies who had shaved their heads 
and taken the vows of celibacy, have married ; one has lately presented 
her husband with a fine boy, and the other with twins.— -There are 
said to be some 4,500 theatres in the United States., Taking the 
average receipts of one night's performance at S150, S675.000 are paid by 
the public for amusements every night during the season. The Western 
arithmetical fiend, who is responsible for these figures, further shows that 
if there are 4,500 theatres, and if S150 is a fair average, and if the sea- 
son runs forty weeks, the people of this country pay, exclusive of the 
matinee performances, about §162,000,000 for their theatrical amuse- 
ments.^— The Tea industry in Assam has created a trade of nearly five 
and a half crores of rupees, more than half of which is in tea, and the 
rest is the result of money which the tea industry has poured into the 
province.-^— In London mo3t of the big brewers control a large number 
of the public houses, as is likewise the case in New York city. When a 
prominent brewing firm of London failed, some years since, they return- 
ed in their schedule 359 public houses of which they held the leases.^— 
Messrs. Seligman Brothers notify that the half-yearly coupons of 
the City of Washington (District of Columbia) Six per cent. Loan was 
paid at their offices, 3 Angel Court, Tbrogmorton Street, London, July 
1st.— —The "works in connection with the Canal are, says the British 
Consul at Panama, undoubtedly opening up a good market for British 
machinery. America, however, at present appears to be obtaining the 
largest share of the contracts and orders. Excavators' picks, shovels, 
lumber, and powder are American. A few French excavators of less 
power are on the Isthmus. The steel rails are Belgian. The locomotives 
and launches are French, but two English steam-tugs are on the way.^— 
Ireland claims a new grievance. The Fishery Commissioners give the 
most doleful accounts of the produce of her seas. Once Dubtin Bay was 
famous for its herrings. In the Autumn that little harbor of Dunleary, 
a well-known haunt of fishermen and smugglers, would be filled with the 
brown sails of the Cornish luggers. They will scarcely come over this 
year — at least not if they read the reports of the Commissioners and be- 
lieve in them. It seems that in 1878 there were nearly 150,000 mease of 
herrings captured, while last year the takes did not amount to a third of 
that figure. And what is more distressing is that this deficiency is gradual. 
From 1877 to 1882 year after year the falling off has progressed. If there 
was a sudden failure it might be accounted for by a disease of the fish, 
but a gradual and continuous dwindling looks as if the herrings were fol- 
lowing the example of the peasantry, and leaving the shores of the island. 
^— Herr von Krupp, of Essen, the well-known iron and steel manu- 
facturer, is about to establish extensive iron shipbuilding yards on the 
Baltic. ^— So severe has been the drought in South Australia that water 
has been selling for two shillings per bucket. 



INSURANCE. 



HUTCHINSON & MANN, 

rNSXTRANCE AOENOT. 
No. 332 & 334 California Street, San Francisco, 



GIRARD ol Philadelphia. 

NEW YORK CITY INS. CO of N. Y. 

NEW ORLEANS ASSOCIATION 

PEOPLES of Newark. 

WATERTOWN of New York. 

ST. PAUL ofStPaul. 



Cal. 

Fixe Insurance. 

TEOTONIA of New Orleans. 

LACONFIANCE of Paris. 

DWELLING HOUSE UNDERWRITERS 
of New York. 
THE FIRE INS. ASSOCIATION (Limited) 
of London, England. 
Marine Insurance. 

LONDON AND PROVINCIAL MARINE INSURANCE CO of London. 

LA FONCIERE MARINE INSURANCE COMPANY of Paris. 

Capital Represented $27,000,000. 

All Losses Equitably Adjusted and Promptly Paid. 

W. L. CHALMERS, 
Special Agent and Adjuster. 

AGGREGATE ASSETS, 

84 0,64X942 . 

Imperial Fire Insurance Co. , of London Instituted 1803. 

London Assurance Corporation, of London 

Established by Royal Charter 1720. 

Northern Assurance Corporation, of London Established 1836. 

Queen Insurance Company, of Liverpool Established 1857. 

A JOINT POLICY ISSUED BY THE FOUR COMPANIES. 

ROBERT DICKSON, Manager. 
W. X,ANE BOOKER, Agent and Attorney. 
S.E. Cor. California and Montgomery Sts., Safe Deposit Building. 
[October 11. 1 

PHINIX ASSURANCE COMPANY 

Of London, Eng., EstaVd 1782— Cash Assets, $5,266,372.35. 

BRITISH AMERICA "ASSURANCE COMPANY 

Of Toronto, Can., EstaVd 1833.— Cash Assets, (1,343,908.54 

WESTERN ASSURANCE COMPANY 

Of Toronto, Can., Estab'd 1 851 Cash Assets, 81,351,326.39. 

BUTLER A- HiLDAX, 
General Agents for Pacific Coast, 

413 California Street San Francisco. 

[July 10.1 " 

HOME MUTUAL INSURANCE COMPANY, OF CALIFORNIA. 

Organized 1864. 
Principal Office 406 California Street, S.F. 

FIRE INSURANCE. 

Capital (Paid Up in XT. S. Gold Coin). $300,000.00 

Be- Insurance Reserve $171,412 75 



Assets January 1, 1882 S 634,577.83 I Premiums, since organization.S3,841,412.07 

Surplus for policy holders.. 674,577.83 | Losses, since organization... 1,756,278.00 

OFFICEBS: 

J. F. HOUGHTON President. I CHAS. R. STORY Secretary. 

J. L. N. SHEPHARD .... Vice-President. | R. H. MAGILL General Agent. 

Directors of the Home Mutual Insurance Co.:— L. L. Baker, H. L. Dodge, J. L. 
N. Shepard, John Currey, J. F. Houghton, W. T. Garratt, C. C Burr, J. S. Carter, 
Charles Belding, D. W. Earl. April 8. 



PACIFIC DEPARTMENT 

LONDON AND LANCASHIRE FIRE INSURANCE COMPANY 

OF LIVERPOOL. 

Capital $7,500,000 

Cash Assets 1,709,976 

Cash Assets in United States 775,003 



March 20. 



BALFOUR, (ilTIIRH! A CO., General Agents, 

316 California Street, San Francisco. 



FIRE AND MARINE INSURANCE. --UNION INS. CO. OF S. F. 

Tbe California Lloyds.-- -Established in 1861.— Nos. 416 and 
418 California street. Cash Capital, $750,000 in Gold Coin. Fair Rates ! 
Prompt Settlement of Loses!! Solid Security ! ! DIRECTORS.— J. Mora Moss, 
Moses Heller, J. 0. Eldridge, M. J. O'Connor, R. S. Floyd, Daniel Meyer, Adam 
Grant, A. E. Sabatie, Charles Kohler, E. L. Goldstein, Bartlett Doe, I. Lawrence 
Pool, A. Weill, I. Steinhart, N. B. Stone, Wallace Everson, A. B. Phipps, Samuel 
Hort, H. C. Parker. N. G. Kittle, Joseph Brandenstein, W. M. Hoag, Nicholas 
Luning, James Moffitt, John Parrott, J. Baum, M. D. Sweeney, Gustave Touchard, 
George C. Hickox, J. H. Freeman, John Conly, J. H. Baird, Wm. Scholle, Charles 
Baum, J. G. Kittle, Benjamin Brewster, Isaac L. Requa. 

GUSTAVE TOUCHAKD, President. N. G. KITTLE, Vice-President. 

James D. Bailey, Secretary. Geo. T. Bohen, Surveyor. Nov. 6. 

THE SWISS MARINE INS. COMPANIES COMBINED. 

Switzerland, of Zurich, Capital 5,000,000 francs; Helvetia, 
of St. Gall, Capital 10,000,000 francs ; Baloise, of Basle, Capital 5,000,000 francs. 
These three Companies are liable jointly and severally for all losses that may be sus- 
ained. Losses made payable in all the principal seaports of the world. In the set- 
tlement of all claims under an English policy, these Companies witlatrictly adhere to 
the conditions and customs adopted at Lloyds, and submit to English jurisdiction. 
June 9. HARRY W. SYZ, Agent, 225 Sausome St., S. F. 

BRITISH AND FOREIGN MARINE INS. CO. OF LIVERPOOL. 



(Capital 85,000,000.— Agents: 
/ 316 California street, San Francieco. 



Balfonr, Guthrie * Co., No. 

Nov. 18. 



Aug. 5, 1882. 



CALIFORNIA ADVKKTI>KK 



LETTER FROM PARIS. 

Paris, July 17. 1883 : Ttw probability «>f Barapeui bostfUtiv ktow- 
ink' >"it ol the RRyptbui qoMtioQ, and iu which France may y<-t Bud hrr- 
•elf involve*!, in anil** of her t>re*ont back ward newi, do*» not seem to turn 
Pari* mMi Iron the more pleasing primped of the great Nation. k] 
Mciu'tii iiarilialdi has promised to honor the invasion with hi* presence, 
ami the Kevulutionary party propOM t<. r«o6r?« him with much «•■ 
U al*o i»aitl that the Lord Majporo! London has been invito*! ta attend 
the inanfftirati»n <>f the n-.w Hotel de Vilte, which is to W one of the 
event* of the day, hut has politely declined. Since John Brown in bh 
highland ooetume, doriufl the Ouoen's visit to Men tone, was supposed by 
the populace to be Loudon's Mayor.it is probable the re;d gentleman 
may hare some delicacy in exhibiting himself to foreigners. Ha will 
miss it, however, for the banquet on the occasion is to be quite Giiyan- 
tuan, Chevet, of the Palais Koyale, having been selected as the presiding 
Vatel. He will be assisted by fifty oooka and one hundred and fifty scul- 
lion-. The President of the Republic has cousented to take the chair 
only on condition that no politics shall be spoken. 

The suburban fett season, too, is in full swing. Charming little Neuilly, 
just outside the ramparts, id now gay and noisy with the tun of the fair. 
This is one of the best round Paris, and should be visited by the tourist. 
He will be struck by the way they do these things in France. There is 
no crushing or roughing, no fighting or drunkenness — all classes meet 
there and amuse themselves peaceably and respectably. 

An interesting anecdote of late is that told at the expense of Benedict 
lievoil, a sporting journalist, who died a few days ago. He prided him- 
self on his superior knowledge of English, and was very fond of translat- 
ing English into French. One day, it appears, he came to Dentu, the 
publisher, in a highly excited state. He had found a remarkable story in 
an American periodical, by an anonymous writer. He had translated it, 
he told Dentu, and breathlessly urged him to publish it without delay, 
lest others Bhould be in the field before them. Dentu, carried away by 
Re veil's enthusiasm, consented to print it at once. Fortunately, one of 
Dentu's readers, while looking over the proofs, made a startling discovery. 
The American story was nothing more than Paul Feval's Les Ciseaux 
d'Or, which had been translated into English by the enterprising Ameri- 
can, and re- translated into French by Revoil. 

The news comes to us that Sarah Bernhardt has been adding to her 
other accomplishments, while in London, that of fencing. She is said to 
make such progress that her teacher is enchanted, and that she possesses 
those natural advantages so requisite to a good swordsman, nimbleuess of 
leg as well as great length of arm. Her motive in imposing the exercise 
upon herself is not thought to be to correct a tendency to obesity. 

Miss Griswold, the young American lady whose debut on the lyric 
stage is still a fresh recollection, is about to sever her connection with the 
Paris opera. Her place, however, is to be filled by another American 
singer, Mad'lle Norica, who has discovered that her voice is better suited 
to French than Italian opera. 

The great social event of late has been the ball given by the Duke and 
Duchess de Fernan-Nunez at the Spanish Embassy. A striking feature 
of the occasion was the appearance of ex-Queen Isabella in sky-blue silk, 
a display of bad taste which has been criticised by the ladies. Among the 
other ladies present (as the Jenkinses say) was the Comtesse de Pourtales, in 
a costume of mingled white and pink. How this name calls to ray mind 
poor Jennie Holladay, and the days of 1869, when she and her sister 
Polly (since Baroness de Baussiere) with their mother were brightest 
among the shining lights of the then American colony. 

Bancroche. 

THE ORIGINAL HOME OF THE HORSE. 

There is no doubt that the original home of the horse is not Europe, 
but Central Asia ; for since the horse in its natural state depends upon 
grass for its nourishment and fleetness lor its weapon, it could not in the 
beginning have thriven and multiplied in the thick forest-grown territory 
of Europe. Much rather should its place of propagation be sought in 
those steppes where it still roams about in a wild state. Here, too, arose 
the first nations of riders of which we have historic knpwledge, the Mon- 
golians and the Turks, whose existence at this day is, as it were, combined 
with that of the horse. From those regions the horse spread in all direc- 
tions, especially into the steppes of southern and southeastern Russia and 
into Thrace, until it finally found entrance into the other parts of Europe, 
but not until the immigration of the people. This assumption is, at least, 
strongly favored by the fact that the farther a district of Europe is from 
those Asiatic steppes — that is, from the original home of the horse— the 
later does the tamed horse seem to have made its historic appearance in it. 

The supposition is further confirmed by the fact that horse-raising 
among almost every tribe appears as an art derived from neighboring 
tribes in the east and northeast. Even in Homer the ox appears ex- 
clusively as the draft animal in land operations at home and in the field, 
while the horse was used for purposes of war only. Its employment 
in military operations was determined by swiftness alone. That the 
value of the horse must originally have depended upon its fleetness can 
easily be inferred from the name, which is repeated in all the branches 
of the Indo-European language, and signifies nearly "hastening," "quick." 
The same fact is exemplified by the descriptions of the oldest poets, who, 
next to its courage, speak most of its swiftness. — Popular Science Monthly. 

Section Eight of the Art Treasures of America has just been issued. 
This section contains twelve full page India proofs, and a considerable 
quantity of interesting letter-press matter and smaller illustrations. 
Amongst the India proofs are " The Women and the Secret," from the 
collection of Mr. H. Probasco, of Cincinnatti, by Hugues Merle; "The 
Children's Favorite," from the collection of Mr. J. A. Brown, Providence 
R. I., by J. S. Myer; " The Temptation of St. Anthony," from the col- 
lection of Mr. H. R. Dousman, St. Louis, by L. A. Leloir; " Before the 
Alcalde," from the collection of Mr. D. W. Powers, Rochester, N. Y., by 
Jules Worns; "The Heroes of the Fe"te," from the collection of Mr. V. 
Newcomb, Louisville, Ky., by Antonio Casanova; " The convent in 
Arms," from the collection, of Mr. Charles Crocker, San Francis- 
co, by Jehan S. Vibert; "The Love Feast," from the collection of Mr. 
C. Parsons, St. Louis, by A. J. Mazerolle. There is also an interesting 
catalogue of various collections of valuable works now in San Francisco. 

Ichi Ban enlarged ; largest in the world. 



INSURANCE. 



The Only Company on the Pacific Coast Governed by the 
chusetts Non-Forfeiture Law. 

NEW ENGLAND MUTUAL LIFE INSURANCE COMPANY, 

OF BOSTON. 

[INCORPORATED is;;.'.. 



Assets 



S16.000.000. 



This i'i.iu|»:iny is Pureh Mul ual, mid Han tmifuurt«il the business of Llfo Insurance 
fur nearly forty yearn. AM its policies arc Uwui-d under and governed by the laws 
of Massachusetts, which provide that: 

Hrst -Nil poller uliati become forfeited "r void tor non-payment 1 <■( Pramtnin, after 
the. payment of TWO Annual Premiums. 

nd In default of payment ol Btibseqnenl Premiums, It in binding on the 
Company to issno a Paid-up Pulley, us provided for according to the published tables. 

TaMabove conditions arc available t.. n.11 l'»li< y-holders, who become such after 

Jan l, ist>t, without further negotiation or Btlpulatli r notification on their port. 

Whenever, after the payment of two Annual Premiums, as aforesaid, the insura- 
ble Interest In the Life of the insured ha* terminated, the net value of the policy, sub- 
ject to certain conditions named in .said Non-forfeiture Law, is made a surrender 
value payable in Cash. Distributions of Surplus are mad© annually on the Contri- 
bution system and are progressive. Liberality and Equity In its relations with Pol- 
icy-holders have always been the governing principles of this Company, and the con- 
ditions of its Policies in regard to limits rf Residence and Travel are of the most 
liberal description. 

J3P™ Before insuring in any Company, carefully read the Application and Form of 
Policy used by the NEW ENGLAND LIFE. 

HENRY K. FIELD. General Agent. 
Office: 328 Montgomery Street (Safe Deposit Building), San Francisco. 

COOS BAY COAL. 



The Cleanest and Cheapest- 
No Soot! No Dirt! 

The Best Coal for Domestic Use! 

All Coal Dealers Keep It! 

[May 27.] 

JAMES G. STEELE & CO.. 

DRUGGISTS AND CHEMISTS, 

Agents for BICOKD'S BESTOKATWE FILLS, 

63a Market Street San Francisco, Cal. 

PALACE HOTEL,. Juno 24. 

R. CUTLAR, D.D.S., 

Has Removed His Dental Office 

Prom 715 Clay Street to No. 23 Post Street. 

Office Hours— From 10 A.M. to 5 P.M. 

[May 6.] 

WILLIAM F. SMITH, M.D., 

OCULIST. 

Formerly at No. 313 Rush street, hat* removed to Phelan's 
Building, Rooms 300 to 304. Hours for Consultation: 12 M. to 3 P.M. 
Take the Elevator. May 27. 

DR. JAMES W. KEENEY, 

OFFICE AND RESIDENCE: 22 MONTGOMERY STREET. 

HOTJP.S: 2 to 4, 7 to 7:30 p.m. 
SUNDAYS: 3 to 4 p.m. April 9. 

DR. WILLIAM E. TAYLOR. 

OFFICE: 215 GEARY ST. RESIDENCE: THE BALDWIN. 

Feb. 5.] OFFICE HOURS: 1 to 4 P.M. 

PAINTING, TINTING, WHITENING AND PAPER-HANGING. 

Gentlemen about to bave work iu tbis line clone will ben- 
efit themselves by calling- at my establishment, examine samples of workman- 
ship, and getting estimates of Cost. Orders sent by telephone (No. 433) from any 
pai-t of the city promptly attended to. E M. GALLAGHER, 

July 8. 611 Sacramento Street, bet. Montgomery and Kearny. 

TURKISH AND RUSSIAN 

Steam Batbs; Electric and Chemical Baths: Salphnrand 
and other medicated vapor baths, with Swedish movements and massage. 
Special apartments for ladies and families. DR. JUSTIN GATES, 

July 1. 722 Montgomery street, near Washington. 

AUGUSTUS LAVER, 

Architect, 

Furnish*** Plans, Specifications anil Superintendence Tor 
the Construction or Renovation of Dwelling Houses, and every describtion of 
Building. Office: 19 S. F. STOCK EXCHANGE, Pine street, S. F. 

£3T Take the Elevator. Dec, 10. 

NOTICE. 

or tbe very best photographs go to Bradley A Knlofson's, 

n an Elevator, 429 Montgomery street. Oct. 29 

MILLARD F. BRADLEY, 

Clearcher of Records, Room 37, 118 Post St., San Francisco. 



F 



Office Hours: 5 to 9 p.m. 



$72' 



$12 a day at home easily made. Costly Outfit Free. 

Address THUS* CO., Augnata, Maine. 



10 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER AND 



Aug. 5, 1882 



THE PUBLIC HEALTH. 

It is gTeatly to be lamented that there is no steady appreciation of 
the question of public health. From time to time there is a spasmodic 
and temporary excitement. The mortality riaes to an alarming point, 
the deaths from diarrhea, diphtheria and typhoid fever increase, and we 
are threatened with an epidemic. The Health Officer reports to the Su- 
pervisors. The Board of Health consults, and turns for a brief space 
from its persecution of the British sea tramp. The sewers are inspected 
and reported to be in their normal state of foulness. No money has been 
provided for their cleansing, much less for their repair or reconstruction. 
The streets are neglected, and the sweepers are turned in. A few hun- 
dred tons of filth are removed, a few of the worst obstructions are re- 
lieved, a little more sewage reaches the outlet. For a week or two there 
is a sensible diminution of the death rate. Every one is satisfied. The 
streets are again Bwept, and the sewers are neglected. The Supervisors 
resume their former apathy. 

The Board of Health revert to the subject of Quarantine, and Death 
again assumes the mastery. The Annual Report of the Medical Officer 
of Health has not yet been presented to the Supervisors. It may be ex- 
pected in a day or two, but its contents may safely be anticipated. 
There will be an excess of 800 deaths over the Report of last year, nearly 
the whole of which has occurred since the commencement of the present 
year. Besides the ijjcray of statistics, which few read and fewer under- 
stand, there will be file usual comments on the causes for the increased 
mortality. Attention will again be directed to the foul condition of the 
sewers, to the total neglect of sewer ventilation — to the urgency of an ex- 
tensive reconstruction of the entire system. Recommendations will be re- 
peated for the tenth time, and as before, ignored. The Report will be 
consigned to the oblivion of the waste basket, and nothing will be done. 
Public opinion will be fully occupied with the coming political contest, 
and perhaps when a few years more have passed, and a few more thous- 
ands have been murdered by sanitary ignorance and neglect, we may be- 
gin to inquire what Bystem of sewerage will be best and most economical, 
and what legislation may be necessary. But as yet the first condition of 
democratic action is absent, for the Public are not educated to under- 
stand the extent and nature of the evil, nor the urgent necessity of a 
radical sanitary reform. 

But it may be remarked that it is the Caucasians who suffer most from 
the condition of the sewerage. The total increase of the Mongolian mor- 
tality during the first six months of the present year, as compared with 
the same months last, is only 73— an increase fully accounted for by the 
large immigration. The white mortality has increased from 1,812 in 1881 
to 2,534 during the first six months of this year — an increase of 722, or 
38.5 per cent.; an increase which is clearly not due to any great increase 
of population. It is the whites mainly who suffer from diphtheria, in- 
fantile cholera, typhoid and malarial fever, and general zymotic disease. 
During the first six months of last year, which were by no means excep- 
tionally healthy, there were 251 deaths, thus classified. This year there 
have been 460, or an increase of 83 per cent. The mortality from diseases 
caused by foul air has been frightful ; and the only source of foul air iB 
the sewer. The area of deposit is so extensive, and re-accumulation of 
filth is so rapid, that all attempts to ameliorate the evil are futile. A few 
days after cleansing a sewer it becomes as bad as ever. Nor is the evil confined 
to the public system. The drains of private houses are very generally 
constructed on false principles, and result in the general introduction of 
poisoned air. The high death rate is sufficient proof of this ; for, as we 
have repeatedly demonstrated, it is within the power of every householder 
to protect himself against the dangers of the public sewers. We have 
seen houses of the first-class erected without any provision for perfect iso- 
lation from the public sewer, and without effective local ventilation of the 
drains. It is deemed sufficient if there is an opening to let out foul air, 
and altogether superfluous to have one for the admission of a pure supply. 

Now, the only remedy for these evils is the diffusion of sanitary in- 
formation. 'We want sanitary instructors — sanitary clubs. We want to 
have the people educated in the conditions of health. We desire that the 
lady or mistress of the house will not be satisfied until the drains are as 
clean as the floors and windows, the food as wholesome as it is palatable, 
and the air within as pure as the air without. The death rate of San 
Francisco ought to be as low as any maritime city in the world. With 
good sanitary administration and the diffusion of sanitary knowledge, it 
is not too much to say that the mortality might be reduced one-half, that 
is to the annual rate of 1.2 or 1.3 per cent. The economic gain to the 
community would pay the cost ten times over, and no one is able to count 
the saving in pain and sickness, misery and bereavement, nor the gain in 
prosperity and happiness resulting from so great a change. 

Once more, then, we venture respectfully to invite the members of our 
University, and especially of our Academy of Sciences, to inaugurate 
such teaching of the people. The public feave frequently been invited to 
discussions on comets, cosmogenies and other unearthly subjects. Bugs 
and beetles are not considered as beneath their notice. And now we pro- 
pose a subject of the very deepest scientific interest, and, at the same 
time, of the closest practical appbcation to the needs of daily life. We 
pray them to teach that which is not to be found in public schools, and 
scarcely, as yet, in public universities. We pray them to assist in dimin- 
ishing the death-rate by teaching people how to live and how to avoid 
disease, because this cannot be effected by acts of legislation, by Boards 
of Health, or by the regulations of infecters and police. 

Ex-Governor Stanford as Park Commissioner.— The appoint- 
ment of ex-Governor Stanford as Park Commissioner, and his acceptance 
of this rather thankless and certainly not profitable task, is worthy of 
comment. That, in addition to the many demands made on his time and 
energies, he should be willing to accept the onerous obligations devolving 
upon him in this new position, is greatly to his credit. His vast wealth 
and untiring energy will soon be exhibited in new and material improve- 
ments, which he has long had in contemplation for the Park, and of 
which the public will reap the benefit. The well-grounded fears that, in 
the absence of any interest on the part of the Supervisors, and of sufficient 
appropriations, the Park was to be neglected and all improvements stayed, 
is now happily dissipated, and this charming resort bids fair to become 
ere long wliat its originators designed it should be — one of the most at- 
tractive features of the city. 

Tbe reportorial staff of the Chronicle seem rather hard up for some- 
thing to do when they have to resort to interviewing the canneries. 



THE SUNDAY LAW ISSUE. 

There is a pronounced disposition on the part of sundry of the Repub- 
lican " organs " to force their party to take issue with that plank in the 
Democratic platform which dealB with the Sunday Law question. If the 
Republican party wishes to destroy any chance of success it has. it will 
do this thing. If it wishes to hurt its prospects more than a veto of an 
anti-Chinese bill by the President on the day before the election would, 
it will declare that it is in favor of allowing a noisy, active crowd of nar- 
row-minded bigots to dictate to their fellow-men what and when they 
(the bigots' fellow-men) shall eat and drink. If the Republican party 
wishes^ to array against it every intelligent, liberal-minded man in the 
State, it will declare that it proposes to be the tool of those who would, 
if they could, take us back to tne days when to look pleasant and feel 
happy on the Sabbath day was accounted an act of sacrilege and im- 
morality. 

"Sunday laws," as they are called, must, if they exist, invade upon the 
liberties of the people. Society in its corporate capacity has a right to 
tell its individual members — and for very obvious reasons — that they 
must cover their nakedness. Beyond that it cannot go without invading 
the proper limits in which the individual is entitled to exercise his own 
judgment. If the Legislature were to attempt to dictate to the people as 
to what kind of clothes they should wear, even the staunchest Sunday- 
law advocate would cry out against the unjustifiable interference. Yet, if 
the Legislature — which is simply society in its corporate capacity — has a 
right to dictate to the individual as to what kind of food and drink he 
Bhall partake of, it has, logically, an equal right to dictate to him as to 
what kind of cloth he shall have his coat made out of. Deny this right, 
and you deny the principle which underlies the Sunday law, as it exists 
in this State now, because that section of the Political Code which is 
designated the Sunday law is simply a half-hearted effort to prevent the 
drinking of intoxicating liquors on Sunday. 

Nor can any law, aiming to compel the observance of the first day of 
the week in any particular manner, be enacted which will not be repug- 
nant to the spirit of the age, the sentiment of the American people and 
the traditions of the American Government. If one man has a right to 
Bpend Sunday reading the Bible, his neighbor has an equal right to spend 
the same day reading Shakespeare. If one man has a right to play the organ 
in a church on Sunday, for a hire, his neighbor has an equal right to play the 
piano in a cnncert-hall on the Bame day, for hire. If a restaurant-keeper 
has a right to sell whisky, wine, beer, coffee, milk, or even water, on 
Sunday, his neighbor — whose place of business may be designated a 
saloon — has an equal right to sell the same articles, or any one of them. 
The News Letter knows full well that the world would be happier if 
there were less drunkenness in it. We know, also, equally well that this 
community would be better and happier if Sunday were spent in a way 
less calculated to promote debauchery and vice. But debauchery, drunk- 
enness, vice, etc., are moral offenses, and the remedy for them must be 
found in the moral sentiment of the people. In other words, people can't 
be made "good" by Act of Legislature. Persuade people that it is wrong 
to drink and go to picnics, etc., on Sundays, and they won't do it. 

THE JAPANESE ON THE INDEMNITY BILL. 
The Japanese papers are poking a little fun at us apropos of the 
Indemnity Fund Bill recently pending in Congress. Speaking of one of 
the amendments offered to the bill, the Mail says it included "an ex- 
quisitely ludicrous proposal that a sum of §15,000 should be paid to 
George S. Fisher, sometime Consul at Kanagawa, for losses in conse- 
quence of 'forcible ejection from his residence and the destruction of his 
property.' When Mr. Fisher moved to Yokohama it is very possible 
that his servants may have broken a glass or dislocated a chair, but the 
notion of converting this into a claim of $15,000, to be paid out of the in- 
demnity, is the most monstrously barefaced piece of jobbery ever 
placed on record." It suggests, " that the amount be paid the Japanese 
Government in lieu of certain funds which are supposed to have lost their 
way in transit through the hands of this ' forcibly ejected' claiment, and 
has never yet been accounted for." Referring to "the sum of 5140,000 
which America hag elected to keep on a claim by her for damage done to 
her shipping in the Straits of Shimonoseki before the naval operations were 
undertaken," it says : "Now the whole amount of this damage was the 
cutting away of a topmast-backstay of the little merchant steamer Pem- 
broke." America has, however, decided to divide this sum as prize-money 
between the crews of the Wyoming and Takiang. On what military 
principle prize-money is awarded to ships which took no prizes, but merely 
engaged in the ordinary operations of war, we are ratber at a loss to con- 
ceive. 

ANOTHER PIONEER GONE. 
Mr. John Sullivan, who passed over the silent river last Friday, was 
one of the best known, and most successful amongst our pioneers. In- 
deed, he has been fittingly described as a pioneer, amongst the pioneers. 
The deceased gentleman was born in Ireland in 1824, but when only six 
years of age, he accompanied his parents to Canada, and settled near Que- 
bec, where he was brought up. When a young man, he went to reside at 
St. Joseph, Missouri. In 1844, in company with the Murphy's, of San 
Jose, he started for California : he and hiB comrades, by the way, entered 
through the Truckee pass, via Conner lake, and were the first white men 
to come that way. In 1846, Mr. Sullivan settled in this city, and enter- 
ed into the commission business, with Zachary Leidesdorff. He invested 
heavily in real estate, and the rapid growth of the city, necessarily made 
him immensely wealthy. Mr. Sullivan was one of the founders of the 
Hibernia Bank, and was its first President. The deceased was recognized 
as a large-hearted, generous gentleman, and was much respected by all 
who knew him, as the immense concourse of people who attended his re- 
mains to their sepulchre on last Monday demonstrated. 

Vancouver Island Railway. — A syndicate formed to construct a rail- 
way on Vancouver Island is composed of English, San Francisco and 
Victoria capitalists. They made preliminary engagements with the Gov- 
ernment, and a Bill for their incorporation is now before the British 
Columbia Legislature. The syndicate will have an authorized capital of 
$5,000,000. They undertake to build a line from Nanaimo to Esqui- 
malt and Comox within four years, and they are to receive the land orig- 
inally reserved for the Island Railway, 1,900,000 acres, including very 
valuable coal lands. 



Aug. 5, 1882. 



CALIFORNIA ADVERTISER. 



11 



THE TOWN CRIER. 

" H»*r Hip Ort*f Wl)»l tb» d*Ttl mri Ihon *" 

*Uo» th*t will plAjr th« ditvil.iir with yon." 

" H»'d * ■tine in hu ull »• lonjc u * flail. 
Which m*dr him crow bolder »ml bolder." 



The c bar mlng regularity with which the police make tri-uionthly 
raid* on gambling houses f«>r the city's percentage of the profits i« thor- 
oughly in keeping with thi* taotloa of the fbrott, but very nauseating to 
the ordinary thinker. The activity of the police is commended by the 
dailies, and the green reporter shows how they enrich the city treasury 
bv $1,1*00 or ?"J,000, calling upon the community to admire these active 
affiom as paragons of energy and rectitude. To buret this bubble the 
reader has only to note that the fines come from the visitors' pockets in 
the main, and not from the dealers. For instance, this week two dealers 
forfeited bail in the sum of $200 each, making a totnl of §400, and 38 
visitors forfeited $40 each, or $1,520. The $200 is nothing to the dealer. 
He often loses and makes that in a quarter of an hour. But the wont of 
the system is that, under the pretense that there is no section applying to 
the retention of the lay-out, the police actually return the dealers all the 
tools which they have seized, so that they can immediately open the game 
which was interrupted for a few hours. Out on such humbug as this! 
It is like putting poor, dear Sir Thomas back in the pond where he was 
drowned "to catch ns some more eels." The whole system of raiding 
faro games is a farce, and it would be pertinent to inquire how much the 
officers on the inside of the police ting get for not raiding these games for 
months at a time* They know where they exist, and the fact that they 
allow them to run all the time in corner groceries even savors strongly of 
a lot of dirty linen in the police force, which it would be well to wash. 

It is rumored that the Board of Education will shortly increase the 
salaries of teachers. There is nothing strange about that, because most 
of the fair instructors of our youth have to pay a heavy percentage of 
their salary to the political leeches who were instrumental in getting them 
appointed, and it is only natural their "protectors" and "patrons" 
should wish to lighten the burdens of their protege's. But what puzzles 
us is, why should the augmentation of salary be made greater in the case 
of those who teach boys than in the case of those who teach girls? For 
instance, if a " special teacher" of mathematics in a boys' high school is 
to get $170 a month, why should a "special teacher" of languages and 
mathematics in a girls' high school be remunerated with only S160 a 
month ? It is true that the proposed arrangement could be construed as 
a compliment to the girls, inasmuch as it implies that there is less labor 
in teaching them than in instructing the inferior sex ; but, on the other 
hand, it might be urged that a poorer quality of teacher, and, conse- 
quently, a poorer quality of instruction is needed for the maidens than 
for the males. The girls ought to consider this question in all its bear- 
ings. It would make a good theme for the Dext graduating exercises, if 
some indignant virgin would only catch on and grapple with it. 

A groceryman got hammered up, last Wednesday, by an athletic 
young deputy license collector in a manner which Bhould serve as a warn- 
ing to all grocerymen who have the impertinence to try and collect their 
bills. The man of soap and candles, and bad lager at 5 cents a bucket, 
was named John Weber. He of the dog-tag and wagon-numbering pro- 
fession gloried in the name of Hinds. The amount in dispute was So, 
but the fair gold-piece which the mop-and-broom man fain would handle 
was denied him. Words succeeded to blows, the Teutonic coal-oil-seller 
leading off with his left and impinging on the cranium of the dispenser of 
permits to retail cigars. Then the scene changed, and in a few minutes 
the dealer in eggs looked as if he had been baptized with a two-pound can 
of strawberry jam and his shirt bosom decorated with cranberry sauce. 
He was hauled round the room like a sack of flour, and his eyes closed for 
repairs, and now, as soon as he is able to to get round on crutches, he propos- 
es to hang out a sign, "Credit to New City Hall clerks positively declined. 
Beware of the dog." The heroic treatment is becoming very fashionable 
in the curing of duns, and, generously administered, as in this case, se- 
cures a modicum of tranquility for oppressed debtors during office hours 
as well as on Sundays. This is a universal boon. 

"Heard tbe news, Jim?" "No; what news?" "Doc. Latham's 
joined tbe church— 's goin' to be a saint !" " No-o ; yubadam." " Fact ; 
true's death." " You don't say! How did it happen ?" " Well, yer see, 
he was a trifle early for lunch last Sunday, and a trifle late for breakfast, 
so he dropped into that gospel-shop end o' New Montgomery. They was 
reading the Litany, I believe they call it, and 'd just got to the part that 
did old Lath's biz. " What does it say? It must have drawn worse than 
a blister." "Well, yer see, it was that part of the circus where the 
gospel-grinder chins on his own hook, praying for Self & (Jo., and the 
audience chips in, ' Good Lord, let up on us,' or words to that effect. 
Just as Doc. Btepped in the parson snuffles out, ' From all blindness of 
heart, from pride, vain-glory, and democracy ;' and then the hull crowd 
pipes up, 'Good Lord, let up on us!' The democracy clause did the 
biz'ness. Doc. says he don't want any better religion nor that, and I ain't 
sure he ain't right. He says he'll hev every member of No. 6 Republican 
Club join that church, and ante up the assessment, too ; and when he 
Bays a thing bet'eher he meanB it. ' Pride, vain-glory and democracy ' ia 
good, and don't you forget it." 

A man died this week of calcification of the heart, and, on being 
opened up, it was found that his organ of tenderness was as bony, stony 
and as generally ossified as that of a medieval miser or a Kearny-street 

g awn-broker. Since then all the rich men who put dimes in the plate on 
unday, and won't eat watermelons until they are ten cents apiece, are 
on the anxious seat, and want to know what this blamed calcification of 
the heart is. For their information the T. C. is glad to be able to explain 
that this is an insidious disease, accompanied by no pain. It is often gen- 
erated by overworking other people and paying small wages, grinding and 
converting souls into labor machines, ruining them in stocks and breaking 
up homes and families. The disease is getting very common now in Cali- 
fornia, and generally proves fatal just at the time when the sufferer haB 
got a plethoric bank account and would like to enjoy it. People who 
build homes for academies ot Bcience, who purchase museums and libra- 
ries for the public, who help distress wherever they find it, and use the 
wealth entrusted to them to dispense in alleviating sorrow and want, 
never have it. That's the kind of a hairpin we are. 



Arabl Pasha i» pl*7fag havoc with the Hog of true*. It appears that 
whon he hoists it the Britten aodentand that nv b making oew Infertnoh- 
ments, sending out a reconnoitering party, or plotting mischief of some 
other kind. Tho day is likely t<i come When Arabl will need to use the 
white flag in real earnest, but if he doesn't change his tactics he will find 
that it would bo safer for him to advance for a parley at full charge, 
brandishing a gory cimetnr and whooping imprecations like a cigar- store 
Apache, than to advance alone and unarmed, with his pocket-handker- 
ohief waving from his walking cane. We may add that Mr. Luring Pick- 
ering shares our opinion in this particular. In a Call editorial the other 
day he (or his young man) after roundly abusing Arabi for disregarding 
the flag of truce, declared that " with him (Arabi) it uo longer answers 
the deceptive purpose for which it was intended." " Deceptive " iB a good 
word, but really, Pickky, dear, you ought not to knock your own ar- 
guments down with it. 

Sister Jeruaha Mehitabel Stow, President of the Social Science 
Sisterhood, Founder of the Woman's Republic of Sao Francisco, Editor, 
Printer and Publisher of the Woman's Herald of Industry and Receptacle 
of Balderdash, Professor of Physical Culture, and Heavy- Weight Cham- 
pion of Woman's Rights for the Pacific Slope, Advocate of the Wearing 
of Bifurcated Leg-Clothing — not the sort you mean — by members of the 
superior sex— the ladies, God love 'em!— Author of a Book of Chaff about 
Probate, etc., etc., et cetera, has issued a " Grand Proclamation," an- 
nouncing herself an independent candidate for the lunatic asylum. Let's 
see ; now does that read: Candidate for — it ought to be "Governor of the 
State." Well, let it go; daresay, it wasn't much of a lapsus, after all. 
Sister Stow has not always been Sister Stow. There was once a Brother 
Stow, but the Lord saw how rough the thing was on him, and trans- 
planted him. 

" Well, I'm ! " He was evidently up from the Cow Counties, and 

unused to the ways of the city. "How?" inquired a nervous-looking 
person who happened to be passing, and fancied himself addressed. 

That let's me out, Mister; I guess I'll get back home. This 'yer city's 
jeBt a little too civilized for me." " What's troubling you?" said the ner- 
vous-looking person, eyeing him suspiciously; "seem to have got 'em 
pretty bad." "Can't yer read plain American?" demanded the man 
from the interior — pointing to a zinc slate on the door of a boot-blacking 
establishment: Boots polished inside. "Jee-roo-sul-fcm / Boots polished 
inside ! This is too much. Here's civilization ef you want it. Fancy 
polishing yer boots inside! It all comes o' too much assthatics. Well, 
I'm d — -d." And he turned along Fourth street, and was heard to in- 
quire how far it was to Townsend. 

It must be very annoying to our national curled darling, President 
Arthur, to have to go among the ladies with such a terrible black eye as 
the Senate and Congress gave him over that River and Harbor BUI. It 
isn't pleasant to the roughest- grained sort of a man to receive a direct 
snub, but to a scented and sensitive beauty of the haughty Arthur brand 
of humanity a snub amounts to nothing less than a slap in the face. 
Arthur ought to be content to sit on his gingerbread throne, without dis- 
playing his ambitious appetite by trying to eat it, and thereby bring his 
immaculate imperial robes too abruptly into contact with the ground. 
However, experience teaches, and the American Antinous will probably 
be more careful with his next veto. 

It is said that forty Chinamen have been killed up in Victoria by a 
land-slide on the railroad, near Yale. If they all belong to the same com- 
pany the event will be worse than a twenty thousand-dollar blaze to an 
insurance company, and knock the bottom out of Coolie dividends for the 
next six months. We suggest to Consul Bee that he could unite to his 
other duties a Coolie life insurance company and take risks on their lives, 
bo that when a mine caves, or forty or fifty are blown up in the San Pablo 
powder works, the company could realize on their defunct property, and 
rebuild, so to speak, with more slaves. 

A barber at the Mission got badly worsted in a fight this week. His 
name was John Levitt. There is a moral hanging round this episode 
somewhere, for John evidently had a close shave and got into a scrape, 
after being pretty well lathered by his foe. A barber should never razor 
row or attempt to beard an antagonist. However, he has had a good lesson, 
and in future if he is round anywhere where there's a muss, he will prob- 
ably Levitt alone. They say that he felt moustacheshamed of himself 
next day. Let soap so. 

" What's the name of the new man ? " asked the boss, taking out of 
his breast-pocket a precious MS. on the early settlement of Guatemala. 
"Appleton, Rev. James Appleton," replied his factotum, with a littlo 
nervousness. "Jieverend, did you say? I thought you knew my opinions 
about parsons. You'll have to get rid of him— I don't want any birds of 
prey round this rookery," exclaimed the boss, with some asperity. " O, 
it's all right, sir, so far as that goes ; fte's been kicked out of the church." 
"Ah! that's another matter. He looks a smart fellow — juBt the kind of 
man we want, I should say." 

What with the Egyptian muddle, the Irish question, the Radical 
Press and the Home Rule Obstructionists we should naturally feel sympa- 
thy for the worries of poor Gladstone, did we not reflect that he is daily 
spared a perusal of the editorials of the Bulletin, Call and Chronicle, about 
him and his policy. Whatever troubles surround or difficulties beset him, 
he is yet free from that misfortune, and is so far a happy man. 

An individual who refreshingly describes himself as " an honest, en- 
ergetic gentleman of fine manners and education," advertises in a morn- 
ing paper this week for a position as "'clerk in a hotel." It is but too 
painfully evident the advertiser is a stranger in America — his ideas of the 
requisite qualifications are so delightfully fresh. 

"Hon. P. T. Baruum, of Bridgeport, Conn,, present owner of Jumbo, 
and Mrs. Barnum," is how the Continental Times mentions the presence 
of the great showman and his wife at a London party. Wonder how 
Mrs. B. likes that kind of mentioning, though ? 

People have been wondering what has made England apparently so 
dilatory in moving on Arabi Bey's works. The fact is, Gladstone has 
been waiting to receive by mail a complete file of the recent issues of the 
Bulletin, ao as to know what to do. 

Itinerant junk dealers are not allowed to frequent Van Ness Avenue 
now. They send ladies into hysterics when they call out, " Rags, bottles, 
sacks !" 



12 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER AND 



Aug. 5, 1882. 



SUNBEAMS. 



"Uncle Simon," exclaimed a boy in breath- 
leas haste, rushing into a Bhop, " did yer heah 
dat yer wife has dun run away wid a barber ?" 
"No, chile; am it a fack?" "Yes, sab. She 
run away. Da was in such a hurry dat de bar- 
ber lef his hat in de house. " Wall, I'se glad he 
lef his hat, fur it makes me de gainer in de tran- 
saction." "But he come back an' tuck de hat, 
den run away an' lef yer wife in de house." "Oh, 
Lord," exclaimed the old man, "den I'se de 
loser in de transaction. 

A son of the Emerald Isle had the misfortune 
one day to fall into Mb well. His wife hearing 
the commotion, rushed out in great consterna- 
tion, and going to the side of the well, called 
down, "Barney! Barney! are you there?" "Faith 
an' I am," came back faintly from the bottom of 
the welL "Barney, Barney, are you dead?" 
"No, but I'm spachless." 

The first triplets born in Colorado befell a 
Leadville woman. Tbey thrived and waxed fat, 
but their mother naturally feared a further stay 
in the glorious climate of Colorado, and yester- 
day she passed through Pueblo en route to her 
old home in Ohio, accompanied by the bobtail 
flush — the old man and the three babies. 

A St. Louis man visited Milwaukee, and 
while there indulged in the luxury of a Turkish 
bath. He died one hour hence. Verdict of cor- 
oner's jury: " He should not have got so much 
mud off from him at one time." 

A woman in Philadelphia was badly burned 
by the explosion of a doughnut in a frying-pan. 
It is supposed the mayor will include doughnuts 
in his next proclamation against the sale of ex- 
plosives. 

Between the young man scented with cigar- 
ettes and the young woman scented with musk 
and patchouly, the railway passenger gets a good 
deal for his six cents these days. 




BROAD GAUGE. 

SUMMER ARRANGEMENT. 

Commencing Monday. April 10* 1882, 
And until further notice, Passenger Trains will leave 
from, and arrive at San Francisco Passenger Depot 
(Townsend St., between 3d and 4th streets,) as follows: 



LKAVH | 

S. P. f 


DESTINATION. 


J ARRIVE 

| s. y. 


8:30 a.m. 


( 




\ 6:40 A.M. 


t 9:30 a m. 




J * 8:10 a.m. 


10:40 a.m. 






9.03 A.M. 


* 3:30 p.m. 


\ . 


.San Mateo, Redwood,. 


.. ! i*10:G2 A. v. 


4:25 P.M. 


"* 


and Menlo Park - . 


f * 3:36 p.m. 


* 5:15 p.m. 






t 4:59 P.M. 


6:30 p.m. 


I 




J , 6:00 P.M. 
J 't 8:15 p.m. 



8:30 a.m 

10:40 a.M 

* 3:30 p.m. 

4:25 p.m. 



, ..Santa Clara, San Jose and 
"j ..Principal Way Stations 



"J 



9:03 a.m 
5:02 A.M. 
3:36 p.m. 
J:00P.M. 
3:16 p.m. 



10:40 a.m. 
* 3:30 p.M 



f .Gilroy, Pajuru, Castroville (I '10 
\ . and Salinas |l 



10:40 a.m.] 
* 3:30 P.M. I 



.Hoi lister and Tres Piuos 



^rn 



02 a M. 
00 P.M. 



:02 a m. 

:00 p.m. 



10:40 A.M, 

• 3.30 p. M 



| ( ...Monterey, Watsonville . ) $,«, 
i Camp Goodall, Aptos, Camp r 
(San Jose, Soquel, Santa Cruz. ) 



02 A.M. 
OOP M. 



10:40 A.M....Soledadand Way Stations ... 6:00 P.M. 
•Sundays excepted, t Sundays only. 

£ZT Special Notice. *%& 

Sunday Excursion* Trains to Monterey and Santa 
Cruz. — First-class Excursion Train to Monterey and I 
Santa Cruz will leave San Francisco every Sunday at 
7:30 a.m. Returning, leave Monterey at 4:35 p.m.; San- 
ta Cruz at 4:15 p.m., arriving; Sau Francisco at 8:40 p.m. 
Fare for the Round Trip to either point, $3. 

Stage connections are made with the 10:40 A.M. 
Train, except Pescadero Stages via San Mateo, which 
connect w ith 8:30 a.m. Train. 

Ticket Offices— Passenger Depot, Townsend street, 
and No. 2 New Montgomery street, Palace Hotel. 
A. C. BASSETT, H. R. JUDAH, 

Superintendent Asst. Pass. & Tkt. Agt. 

836""~ S. P. Atlantic Exprsss Train via Los Angeles, 
Yuma, etc., leaves San Francisco daily via Oakland 
Ferry, foot of Market street, at 9:30 a.m. 



C. P. R . R. 

Time Schedule, Monday, May 15, 1882. 

Trains leave* and are due to arrive at, 

San Francisco as follows: 



LEAVB 
(for) 



DESTINATION. 



ARRIVE 

(from) 



9:30 a.m. 
*4:00p.M. 
•4:30 P.M. 

8:00 A.M. 

3:30 P.M 
*4:30 p.m. 

8:00 a.m. 
•4:00 p.m. 

9:30 a.M 

4:30 p.m. 

8:00 a.m 
*4:00p.m 

8:00 A.M 
*4:30 p.m. 
18:00 a.m 

9:30 a,m. 

8:00 am 

5:00 p.m. 

9:30 a.m 
*4:00 p.m, 

8:00 a.m. 

8:00 a.m. 
10:00 a.m 

3:00 p.m. 

6:00 P.M, 

3:30 P.M 

5:30 P.M. 

8:00 a.m. 

8:00 a.m, 

8:00 a.m. 

3:30 P.M, 
"4:30 p.m. 
•4:00 p.m. 

8:00 a.m 

3:00 p.m. 

8:00 a.m. 

0:30 a.m, 

3:30 P.M. 
*4:00p.M, 
*4:30 p.m. 

3:30 p.m. 

8:00 a.m. 
*4:30 P.m. 
*o:00 a.m. 



.Antioch and Martinez 



. . Calistoga and Napa. , 



. ( Deming, ElPaso ) Express 

. \ and East J Emigrant .. 

. j Gait and )_ via Livermore 

. J Stockton ) via Martinez 

...lone 

. . . Knight's Lauding 

" " ({Sundays only) 

...Los Angeles and South , 

. . Livermore and Pleasanton. 

. . . Madera and Fresno 



. Marysville and Chico. . . . 
.Nilesand Haywards.... 



Ogdeu and I Express 

East f Emigrant....... 

Redding and Bed Bluff 

Sacramento, ) via Livermore 
Colfax and > via Benicia. . . . 

Alta ) via Benicia 

Sacramento, via Benicia.... 
Sacramento River Steamers.. 
San Jose 



...Vallejo., 



(t Sundays only)... 



.Virginia City., 
.Woodland 



. Willows and Williams. , 



•i:40p.M. 

*12:40 P.M. 

*10:10 a.m. 

7:40 p.m. 

11:40 a.m. 

*10:10 a.m. 

-10:10 a.m. 

7:40 p.m. 

2:40 p.m. 

7:10 A.m. 

5:40 P.M. 

*12:40 p.m. 

5:40 p.m. 

^10.10 A- M. 

Ul:40 a.m. 

2:40 p.m. 

5:40 p.m. 

8:40 a.m. 

2:40 p.m. 

•12:40 p.M. 

5:40 p.m. 

5:40 p.M. 

4:10 p.m. 

9:40 A.M. 

8:40 a.m 

11:40 A. M. 

6:10 A.M. 

5:40 P.M. 

6:40 P.M. 

7:40 p.m. 

11:40 a.m. 

*10:10 A.M. 

*6:00 a.m. 

4:10 p.m. 

9:40 a.m. 

7:40 P.M 

2:40 P.M. 

11:40 a.m. 

»12.40 p.m. 

*10:10 a.m. 

11:40 a.m. 

♦7:40 p.m. 

10:10 a.m. 

♦7:40 p.m. 



Train leaving San Franciaco at S:30 A.SL should meet 
Pacific Express from " Ogden " at San Pablo ; also Pacific 
Express from "El Paso" at Antioch. 



LOCAL FERRY TRAINS, 
Via Oakland Pier. 



From "S AN FBA1VCIBCO." Pally. 

To EAST OAKLAND — 'COO, 0:30. 7:30, 5:30. 9:30, 

10:30, 11:30, 12.30, 1.30, 2:30, 3:30, 4:30, 5:30, 6:30, 

7:00, S:00, 9:30, 11:00, »12:00. 
To ALAMEDA— *6:00, -t6:30, 7:00, *+7:30, 8:00, - t8:30, 

9:00, 't9:30, 10:00, 11:00, 12:00, 1:00, 2:00, 3:00, »t3:30, 

4:00, "U.S0, 5:00, «+5:30, 6:00, *t6:30, 7:00, «8:00, 9:30, 

11:00, •12:00. 
To BERKELEY — »6:00, »6:30, 7:00, "7:30, 8:00, "8:30, 

9:00, 19:30, 10:00, 110:30, 11:00, tll:30, 12:00, 1:00, 

2:00, 3:00, 4:00, 4:30, 5:00, 5:30, 6:00, 6:30, 7:00, 8:00, 

9:30, »1!:00. 
To WEST BERKELEY— «6:00, »6:30, 7:00, «7:30, 18:00, 

•8:30, 9:00, 10:00, 11:00, 2:00, 3:00, 4:00, "4:30, 5:00, 

•5:30, 6:00. <«30, 7:00. 

To "SAJf FRANCISCO," Daily. 



From BROADWAY. Oaklasd -'5:32, »6:02, 6:32,7:02, 

7:32, 8:02, 8:32, 9:02, 9:32, 10:02, 10:32, 11:02, 11:32, 12:02, 

12:32, 1:02, 1:32, 2:02, 2:32, 3:02, 3:32, 4:02, 4:32, 5:02, 

5:32, 6:02, 6:32, 7:02, 8:02, 9:32, 11:02. 
From EAST OAKLAND— *5:21, «5:51, 6:21, 6:51, 7:51, 

8:51, 9:51, 10:51, 11:51, 12:51, 1:51, 2:51, 3:51, 4:51, 

5:51, 6:51, 7:51, 9:21, 10:51. 
From ALAJIEDA— »5:15, *5:45, 6:J6, 7:10, <t7:35, 8:10, 

'-+8:35, 9:10, «W:3b, 10:10, <'tl0:35, 11:10, 12:10, 1.10, 

2:10, 3:10, 4:10, "+4:35, 5:10, *t5:36, 6:10, «+6:35, 7:15, 

"+7:35, 9:15, 10:45. 
From BERKELEY— »5:45, «6:15, 6:45, "7:15,7:45, *S:\b, 

8:45, 19:15, 9:45, 110:15, 10:45, 111:15, 11:45, 12:45, 

1:45, 2:45, 3:45, 4:15, 4:45,5:15,5:45,6:15,6:45, 7:45, 

9:15, -10:45. 
From WEST BERKELEY — '5:45, *6:16, 6:45, '7:15, 

7:45, 8:45, 9:45, 10:45, 1:45, 2:46, 3:45, 4:45, *5:15, 6:45, 

«6:15, 6:45, '7:15. 



Creek Route. 

From SAN FRANCISCO— *7:15, 9:16, 11:16, 1:15, 3:15, 

5:15. 
From OAKLAND— «6:15, 8:15, 10:15, 12:15, 2:15, 4:15. 

All trains run daily, except when star (*) denotes Son- 
days excepted. 

•Trains marked thus (I) run via East Oakland. 
(t)SundayB only. 



" Standard Time" furnished by Randolph & Co., Jew- 
elers, 101 and 103 Montgomery St., S. F. 

T. H. GOODMAN, Gen. Pass, and Ticket Agt. 
A. N. Townb, Geuerai Manager. 



L. H, Newton. M. Newton. 

NEWTON BROTHERS & CO., 

Importers and Wholesale Dealers in 
Teas, Foreign Goods and Groceries, 204 and 206 
California street, San Francisco, Cal May 25. 




On and after Monday. April 3d, 1883, 
Boats and Trains will leave San Francisco as 
follows: 



*7 "I C\ am. daily (Sundays excepted), via San Rafael, 
■ • J- VJ from Market-street wharf, for Petaluma. San- 
ta Rosa, Healdsburg, Clovcrdale, Guerneville and way 
stations. Stages connect at Geyserville for Skaggs' 
Springs; and at Clovcrdale for Highland Springs, Kel- 
seyville, Soda Bay, Lakeport, Ukiah and Geysers. 



Dally, Except Sundays. 

2Q/"\ p.m., via Donahue, from Washington-street 
■*>V W harf 

4lXf\ P.M., via San Rafael, from Market-street wharf, 
mO\J for Petaluma, Cloverdale and way stations. 
Stages for Navarro Ridge and Mendocino City leave 
Cloverdale daily at 6 a.m. 



Sunday Excursions. 

8 0A A.M., Sundays only, via Donahue, from Wash- 
• •«" ington-street wharf, for Cloverdale and way 
stations. Round Trip Tickets on Sundays to Petaluma, 
SI. 50; Santa Rosa, $2; Healdsburg, £3; Cloverdale, 
$4.50; Guerneville, $3. Returning, will arrive in San 
Francisco at 6:45 P.M. 



8"| fC A.M., Sundays only, via San Rafael, from Mar- 
•J-v ket-street wharf, for Miller's, Pacheco, Novato 
and Burdell's. Returning, will arrive in San Francisco 
at 7:45 p.m. 



GEYSERS! GEYSERS! 

The Greatest Natural Wonder of the 

World 1 



Immense Reduction in Sates. 

Round Trip Tickets, via Cloverdale $8 50 

Round Trip Tickets, via Cloverdale andCaiistoga.$12 60 



Passengers will leave San Francisco at 7:10 a.m. 
I week days, from San Quentin Ferry, and arrive at the 
Geysers "at 2:30 p.m. On Sundays, leave Washington- 
street Wharf, by Steamer JAMES M. DONAHUE, at 
8:20 a.m. Returning, arrive m San Francisco by either 
route the following evening. 



ARTHUR HUGHES, 
Gen. Manager. 



PETER J. McGLYNN, 
Gen. Pass. & Tkt. Agt. 



SONOMA VALLEY RAILROAD. 

On and after Monday, April 3d, 1882, 
Boats and Trains will leave San Francisco as 
follows: 



O Of) p. m. daily (Sundays excepted), from Washing- 
■"•OVF ton-street Wharf, for the town of Sonoma. 
Fare, 81. Round Trip Tickets, from Saturday till Mon- 
day, SI 50. 

SUNDAY EXCURSIONS. 

8 0A a.m. (Sundays only), from Washington-street 
• £i\J Wharf, for the town of Sonoma. Round TriD 



Tickets, 81. 



Wharf, for the town of Sonoma. Round Trip 



ARTHUR HUGHES, 
Gen. Manager. 



PETER J. McGLYNN, 
Gen. Pass. & Tkt. Agt. 



H. B , Williams. A. Ohesebrough. 

W. H.Dimorid. 

WILLIAMS, DIM0ND & CO., 

Shipping and Commission Merchants, 

UNION BTJlXDINer, 

Junction Market and Pine Streets . 

AGENTS FOR 

Pacific Mail Steamship Company, Pacific 

Steam Navigation Company, The Cu- 

nard Royal Mail Steamship Company, 

" The California Line of Clippers " 

from New York and Boston, 

and ' ' The Hawaiian Line . ' * 

San Francisco, January 31, 18S0. [Jan. 31. 



*' Look heah, boss, I wants de law on Miss 
Matilda Snowball," said Jim Webster, as he en- 
tered the office of Justice Gregg, and with his 
hooked finger dashed beads of perspiration as 
large as pecans from his brow. " What did she 
do ?" "She am de lady who bust two holes in my 
banjo." "On purpose?" "Ob course she did. 
Ef she didn't mean to bust dem ar two holes in 
de banjo, what for did she hold up her two sharp 
pinted elbows when I tried to bang her ober her 
black cocoanut wid de banjo, fur gibben me sass?" 



Aug. 5, 1«82. 



CALIFORNIA ADVEKTISKK. 



13 



A MODERN DRINKING SONG. 
Kill hik'li tin bowl with Fusil "ill 

With tannin kt your can m arowned] 

If utryvhiiiur invest relief to Toil, 

!.■: stryilmiii''> goner»IU juiee alxmn.l! 
l.'t Oil ..f \'itri«-l cool your brains, 

Or, animated atoms bnu 
And till your :irU'rii>, heart*, ami veins 

With ^lee— aiul infusorial ffliiel 
Vine! That died out in '58— 

What fool would have it back ? And how ? 
The "cup that will inebriate 

And never cheer,' they sell us now. 
"The conscious water saw its God 

And blushed." What of it? Don't you feel 
That water knows the Drugger's r<»!, 

And bin* lies now— with (.'ochineal? 
Ah-h! fragrant fume of Kreoaote! 

Bewitching bowl of Prussian Blue! 
Who would not soothe Mb parching throat 

With your mild offspring, "Mountain Dew"? 
Stronger than aught that racked the frame 

And shook the mighty brain of Burns, 
Surely ye'll set our heads aflame 

Whene'er his festal day returna. 
Bring on the Beer — fresh Copperas foam, 

With Alum mixed, in powder fine: 
How could my foolish fancy roam 

In search of whiter froth than thine ? 
Thy Indian Berry's Essence spread 

Though amber wavelets, sparkling clear, 
Benumbs dull Care — strikes feeling dead, 

And narcotizes Shame and Fear! 
Far down thy bubbling depths, Champagne! 

Drowned honor, Love, and Beauty lie — 
They fought th' unequal fight in vain — 

Shall we, too, merely drink — and die? 
Sweet Acetate of Lead, forbid! 

Fill every drink with pangs, and tell 
What tortures could— and always did — 

Anticipate the stings of Hell! 
Then drink, boys! drink! We never can 

Drink younger! And we never will 
Be men — or aught resembling man, 

While poisoners have the power to kill! 
Amen! From Frenzy's screech of mirth 

To maudlin Sorrow's driveling flow, 
We'll rave, through scenes unmatched on earth, 

And not to be surpassed below! 

— Boston Post, 

THUNDER STORMS. 

Heavy thunder storms are reported as having taken place in various 
parts of Great Britain recently, accompanied in some instances by dam- 
age to property and loss of life. At the village of Llandyssil, in Carmar- 
thenshire, a number of cows were killed by lightning. At Durham, on 
the preceding Friday, during a heavy thunder storm, the lightning struck 
a trap let into the cavity of the trench by which the telegraphic wires 
are carried up Silver-street. The trap consisted of a block of stone with 
an iron frame, the latter half an inch thick. The stone, a foot and a-half 
long and weighing about a half hundredweight, was thrown Beveral feet 
into the air and smashed, while the iron framework was torn off and 
twisted out of all shape. At a church in Ormskirk, near Liverpool, du- 
ring evening service, the congregation were terrified by a sudden report 
and flash, and what appeared like a ball of fire passed through the church 
from the north-east. A panic ensued for a short time, but it was al- 
layed by the vicar and curate, when it was found that no one was hurt. 
Subsequent examination proved that the lightning had struck the steeple, 
shattering some of the stonework inside, but leaving very little trace out- 
side. 

At Runcorn, also, near Liverpool, a house was struck, the lightning 
making a large hole in the outer wall, passing into the room, and dam- 
aging the window casing, but otherwise doing no damage. At Dal- 
keith, in Scotland, the roof of the High School was struck and consid- 
erably damaged, as also was one of the chimney stacks. At Dysart 
the lightning Btruck the chimney of the Victoria Linen Works, Sin- 
clairtown. At Sirenhill, in the Stonehouse District, Scotland, the light- 
ning prssed down the chimney of a house, knocking over a woman and 
child Bitting by the fire-place, but not seriously hurting them; a man 
walking on the road at the same place was also knocked down, but 
though shaken, not otherwise hurt. The same storm seems to have 
visited Keith, where a valuable horse belonging to Mr. Mitchell, of 
Cairnie, was killed; the animal had been standing by a wire fence, and 
it 1b supposed that the lightning traveled along the fence. At Selkirk 
the telegraph instruments were put out of gear by having their coils 
fused, and, consequently, telegraphic communication was interrupted for 
six hours.— Electrician. 

Dust and Dusting.— Do not dust, but wipe! The duster, that peace- 
ful emblem of domestic labor, may, under certain circumstances, become 
a dangerous weapon to handle. We are in earnest. An Eminent scien- 
tist declares it to be a fact. Do you know what you are doing when you 
brush away dust ? You disseminate in the air, and consequently introduce 
into your own interior, into your tissues and respiratory organs, all sorts 
of _ eggs, spores, epidemic germs and murderous vibiones which dust con- 
tains. One movement with a feather duster may be enough to poison 
both you and your neighbors — to inoculate you all with typhus, varioloid, 
or cholera— strange as it may appear. Instead of a feather duster take a 
damp cloth ; wipe away the dust instead of stirring it up. In short, wipe 
—never duBt. 

Tne new food, which has cured the chronic dyspeptics of Japan, is 
Midzu Ami (Japanese Malt), at Ichi Ban. 



COAL AND WOOD, 

Wholesale and Retail, 

At the Old Number 20 9 Sansome Street. 

GEORGE H. HUNT & CO. 

tW Any Artio'e In the Line Supplied. tf» 



Telephone No. S3 1. 



ROEDERER CHAMPACNE! 



NOTICE. 
The Trade mid the Public nre Informed linn we Receive the 

GENUINE 

LOUIS ROEDERER CARTE BLANCHE CHAMPAGNE, 

Direct from Mr. Louis Roederer, Reims, 

Over his Signature and Consular Invoice. 



$&" Each case is marked upon the side, "Macondray & Co., San Fran- 
cisco," and each bottle bears the label, " Macondray & Co., Sole Agents 
for the Pacific Ooast^ __^„ 

MACONDRAY & CO., 

Sole Agents for the Pacific Coast. 
[September 24.] 

M. A. QUNST & CO., 

203 Kearny Street San Francisco. 

IMPORTERS AND DEALERS IN 

HAVANA AND KEY WEST CIGARS, 

Also, Agents for Kimball, Gaulliener & Co 'a Guatemala Cigars. 
E^" Inform the Public that tJtey receive large invoices of Choice 
Havana Brands twice a month. [Feb. 19. 

C. ADOLPHE LOW & CO., 

Commission Merchants, 
SAN FRANCISCO and NEW YORK. 

82T Agents of American Sugar Refinery, corner of Union and Battery streets, 
San Francisco, California. Jan. 17. 

Olaus Spreckels, Wm. G-. Irwin. 

WM. G. IRWIN & CO., 

Sugar Factors and Commission Agents, 

Honoll'lu, H. I. TMarch 26. 

J. D. SPRECKELS & BROS., 

Shippin and Commission Merchants- 

Hawaiian lAne of Packets. 

325 Market Street San Francisco. 

__ May 28 . 

CALIFORNIA SUGAR REFINERY, 

Manufacturers of the Standard Syrup, a superior article 
put up in barrels expressly for home consumption. Also, Extra Heavy Syrup 
in barrels for Export. Refined Sugars at lowest market rates. Office 325 Market 
street, up stairs Dec. 21. 

GEORGE C. HICKOX & CO., 

STOCK BROKERS, 

No. 314 Pine Street San 'Francisco. 

[May 20.] 

ALASKA COMMERCIAL COMPANY, 

No* 310 Sansome Street, 

San Francisco, 

WHOLESALE DEALERS IN FURS. 

[September 21.1 

JOSEPH GILLOTT'S STEEL PENS. 

Gold Medal, Parts, 1S7S. 

Sold by all Stationers. Sole Agrent for the T/ulted States: 
MR. HENRY HOE, 91 John street, N. Y. Jan. 6. 

C. W. M. SMITH, 

The Leading and Oldest Patent Solicitor, 

Established in 1862, 
Removed to 224 Sansome Street. 

63T" MR. C. W. M. SMITH is the patent attorney for Marriott's Aeroplane Com- 
pany for Navigating the Air. Oct. 22. 

TABER, HARKER & CO., 

IMPORTERS AJfD WHOLESALE &ROOER8, 
108 and 110 California St., S. F. 

tApri] 19.] 

REMOVAL. 

IWadham has removed to Boom 2, ,\o. 528 California St., 
_j|» Bank Commissioners' Office. ____ June 10. 




$5 to $20 



per day at me. Samp'ea worth $f> tree. 

Address StinsonA Co., Portland, Maine. 



14 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER AND 



Aug. 5, 1882. 



CRADLE, ALTAR AND TOMB. 



CRADLE. 

Anderson— Id this city, August 1, to the wife of Alfred Anderson, a daughter. 

Bbrtrand— In this city, July 31, to the wife of Emile Bertrand, a daughter. 

Berobr— In this city, July 29, to the wife of L. Berger, a daughter. 

Bi'Rmeister— Iu this city," July 28, to the wife of Alrich Bunneister, a daughter. 

Brat— In this city, July 27, to the wife of Henry T. Bray, a son. 

Balz —In this city, July 28, to the wife of Adolph Balz, a son. 

Campbell — In this city, July 27, to the wife of W. Henderson Campbell, a daughter. 

Covne— In this city, July 31, to the wife of D. Coyne, a daughter. 

Carr — In this city, July 8, to the wife of Joseph J. Carr, a son. 

Crowlbt— In this city, July 24, to the wife of Cornelius Crowley, a daughter. 

Emerton— In this city, July 24, to the wife of J. W. Emerton, a son. 

Edwards— In this city, Juiy 26, to the wife of William Edwards, a daughter. 

Gsrz— In this city, July 30, to the wife of R. J. Getz, a daughter. 

Gasper— In this city, July 26, to the wife of G F. Gasper, a daughter. 

Harris— In this city, July 30, to the wife of Adolph Harris, a daughter. 

Rennet— In this city, July 28, to the wife of John Kenney, a daughter. 

Knapp — In this city, July 30, to the wife of J. R, Knapp, a daughter. 

Llndblad— In this city, July 25, to the wife of Herman Lindblad, a son. 

Mann — In this city, July 27, to the wife of Simon Mann, a son. 

MlNGHAM— In this city, July 26, to the wife of Robert Mingham, a daughter. 

Mblhado— In this city, July 26, to the wife of Charles Melhado, a son. 

Pkrrt— In this city, August 1, to the wife of William Perry, a son. 

Quins In this city, to the wife of George Quinn, a daughter. 

Richards— In this city, July 23, to the wife of P. Richards, a son. 

Roberts— In this city, July 24, to the wife of John Roberts, a daughter. 

Ricuhillbr— In this city, July 27, to the wife of George Richmiller, a daughter. 

Roche— In this city, July 27, to the wife of E. P. Roche, a son. 

Rbbs— In this city, July 27 to the wife of W. H. Rees, twin daughters. 

Rtan — In this city, July 27, to the wife of M. S. Ryan, a son. 

Smith— In this city, July 25, to the wife of J. F. Smith, a son. 

Sinclair— In this city, July 28, to the wife of Frederic Sinclair, a son. 

TilAis— In this city, July 27, to the wife of Robert A. Thain, a daughter. 

Whitnet— In this city. July 29, to the wife of F. L. Whitney, a daughter. 

Wibb— In this city, July 29, to the wife of J. H. Wise, a daughter. 

Wienholz— In this city, July 27, to the wife of N. C. Wieoholz, a son. 

Wise— In this city, July 29, to the wife of Isadore H. Wise, a daughter. 

Wolpp- In this city, July 26, to the wife of Rev. M. Wolff, a daughter. 

Wulzen— In this city, July 25, to the wife of F. H. Wulzen, a daughter. 

ALTAR. 

Asderbon-Frankel— July 29, August Anderson to Caroline Fraukel. 

Buss- Wegener— By Rev. C. F. Waldecker, Henry Buss to Margaretha Wegener. 

Bacon-Swift— July 30, by Rev. Dr. Scott, Charles E. Bacon to Hattie E. Swift. 

Cutler-Waitt— July 31, Charles H. Cutler to Hulda R. Waitt. 

Currey-Bucr bee —July 29, Robert J. Currey to Lillie May Buckbee. 

Emerson-Henry - — July 27, John A. Emerson to Annie E. A. Henry. 

Goodmann-Brill— July 30, Rev. Simon Goodman to Hani Jette Brill. 

Greenb-Knapp— July 26, George D. Greene to Cynthia E. Knapp. 

Halsbt- Porter— July 19, F. A. Halsey to Amy F. Porter. 

Hoffman-Levbt— July 30, Bernard Hoffman to Annie Levey. 

Hoetz-Aters— July 26, by Rev. Father Duffy, Theo. Huetz to Maggie Ayers. 

Hitcucock-Lawson— July SO, George W. Hitchcock to Louise Lawson. 

Kobniqbbbrger-Tomskt — July 30, Adolph Koenigsberger to Fannie Tomsky. 

Lefavor-Collins— In this city, August 2d, by Rev. Dr. Scott, in St. John's Presby- 
terian Church, Frederick H. Lefavor, U. S. N., to Miss Lizzie S. Collins, of San 
Francisco. 

Rbtnolds-Kngelken— July 19, B. A Reynolds to Hattie E. Engelken. 

Saundkrs-Ciiapman— July 27, Elias Saunders to Lois H. Chapman. 

Smith-Rbgan— July 26, Alonzo C. Smith to Susie E. Regan. 

Turser-Klattka— July 27, Harry Turner to Emelie Klattka. 

Womble-Hand— July 26, James W. Womble to Lowrena Hand. 

TOMB. 

Arnold— July 27, Hiram H. Arnold, a native of Virginia, aged 93 years. 

Copfrein— July 31, Elizabeth Coffrein, a native of Ireland, aged 66 years. 

Ci'RLET — July 30, John M. Curley, a native of Ireland, aged 60 years. 

Courtnet— July 30, Lawrence Courtney, aged 18 years and 3 months. 

Connollt — July 28, James Connolly, a native of Ireland, aged 38 years. 

DorousRTT— July 29, Ann Dougherty, aged 50 years. 

De Graw— July 26, Chas. S. De Graw, a native of New Jersey, aged 45 years. 

Galvis — Julv 29, John Galvin, a native of Ireland, aged 39 years. 

Gilrot— August 1, Bridget Gilroy, aged 48 years. 

HANRAHAN-July 30. Lot Hanrahan, a native of Ireland, aged 60 years. 

Healet— July 31, Hugh Hcaley, a native of Ireland, aged 69 years. 

Hunter— July 27, Mathilde Hunter, a native of France, aged 20 years. 

Henrt — August 1, Edward Henry, aged 50 years. 

Irish— July 29, Mrs Sarah Irish, formerly of Brooklyn, N Y., aged 55 years. 

JosT-July 30, W. H. Jost. a native of England, aged 54 years. 

Lact — July 27, Mrs. Mary Lacy, a native of Ireland, aged 40 years. 

Lvncu —July 26, Celia Lynch, a native of Ireland, asred 36 years. 

Malech— July 30, Emma C. Malech, a native of Philadelphia, aged 56 years. 

Marciiini— July 27, Mariano Marchini, a native of Austria, aged 50 years. 

Maritzen— July 31, Henry Maritzen, a native of Germany, aged 32 years, 

Petersen — July 2S, Nicholas Petersen, a native of Denmark, aged 37 years. 

Siieffbr — July 30. Nellie E. Sheffer, a native of New York State. 

Swbknky — July 30, Michael Sweeney, a native of Ireland, aged 32 years. 

Sinclair— July 30, Fannie W. Sinclair, agetf 22 years 

Sullivan— July 29, John Sullivan, a native of Ireland, aged 58 years. 

Spboul— July 26, Margaret E. Sproul, aged 30 years and 5 months. 

A CHANGE OP LOCATION. 

Messrs. Bradley & Rulofaon, the pioneer photographers, are about to 
remove their gallery from the location which it has occupied, at the corner 
of Sacramento and Montgomery streets for almost thirty years past, to 
one closer to the present center of the city. This change has become an 
absolute necessity. The already large volume of business done by this 
celebrated establishment is daily increasing, and enlarged accommodation 
and improved facilities are necessary in order to transact it. Besides, as 
we all know, the march of improvement and tbe growth of the city have, 
within the past ten years, changed the direction of travel and the location 
of those thoroughfares which are most used, and Messrs. Bradley & Rulof- 
son, recognizing this fact, feel that it is their duty to accommodate the 
throng of patrons which the world-wide celebrity of their work attracts 
to their establishment, by securing a location which cannot be excelled for 
easiness of access from the popular thoroughfares. The firm have, there- 
fore, determined to remove to the upper floor of Blythe's new building, 
which is situated on the southeast corner of Geary and Dupont streets, 
and, judging from the plans already drawn, the establishment they pro- 
pose fitting up promises to excel in elegance and comfort any similar 
establishment on this coast. Messrs. Bradley & Rulofson, in consequence 
of this removal, find it necessary to announce that they will be compelled 
to destroy some of the negatives taken prior to July 1, 1877. Those per- 
sons, therefore, who wish their negatives preserved are requested to send 
a notification to that effect. 



PACIFIC MAIL STEAMSHIP COMPANY. 

The Company's steamers will sail for Yokohama mid 
Hongkong: CITY OF TOKIO. Sept. 16, at 2 P.M. Excursion Tickets 
to Yokohama and return at special rates. 

For NEW YORK via PANAMA: COLIMA, Augus-t 4th, at 10 o'clo k a.m., taking 
Freight and Passengers to MAZATLAX, ACAPULCO, SAN JOSE DE GUATEMALA, 
LA LIBERTAD and PUNTA AHENAS. 

Fare to New York— Cabin, $139; Steerage, $65. 
Tickets to and from Europe by any line for sale at the lowest rates ; also f. r Ha- 
vana and all West India ports. 

For HONOLULU, AUCKLAND and SYDNEY: CITY OF SYDNEY, August 
26th, at 2 r.M., on arrival of the English mails. 

$10 additional is charged for passage in Upper Cabin. Round the World Trip 
Tickets, via New Zealand and Australia, $650. 

Tickets must be purchased at least one hour before time of sailing. 

For freight or passage apply at the office, cor. First and Erannan streets. 

Aug. 5. WILLIAMS, DIMOND & CO., General Agents. 

OCEANIC STEAMSHIP COMPANY. 

FOR HONOLULU, H. I. 

The Steamship SUEZ Dodd, Master 

Will Leave for the Above Port 

WEDNESDAY, August 9th, at 12 O'Cloch M., 

From Main-Street Wharf. 
Freight will be taken at $4 per ton. Freight will be received on '■' ednesday, July 5th. 
For freight or passage apply to 

J. I>. SPBECKELS «fc BROS., Agents, 
July 22. 327 Market, corner Fremont. 

OCCIDENTAL AND ORIENTAL STEAMSHIP CO., 

For Japan and China, leave wharf, corner First and Bran- 
nan streets, at 2 p.m., for YOKOHAMA AND HONGKONG, connecting at 
Yokohama with Steamers for Shanghai. 

BELGIC Saturday, July 22d I COPTIC Tues Sept. 5th 

ARABIC Saturday, Aug. 12th BELGIC Thursday, Sept. 2Sth 

OCEANIC Thursday, Aug. 24th | 

Excursion Tickets to Yokohama and Return at Reduced Rates. 
Cabin Plans on exhibition and Passage Tickets on sale at C. P. R. R. Co.'s General 
Offices, Room 74, corner Fourth and Townsend streets. 

For Freight, apply to GEORGE H. RICE, Freight Agent, at the Pacific Mail Steam- 
ship Company's Wharf, or at No. 202 Market street. Union Block, 

T. H. GOODMAN, General Passenger Agent. 
LELAND STANFORD. President. July 22. 

PACIFIC COAST STEAMSHIP COMPANY. 

Steamers of this Company will sail from Broadway Wharf 
as follows : 
For Victoria, B.C., and Puget Sound Ports: On the 10th, 20th and 30th of each 
month (except when such days fall on aholiday, then on the day previous!. Steamer 
of the 30th connects at Port Townsend with steamer "City of Chester" for Alaska. 
For Portland, Oregon, in connection with the 0. R. & N. Co.: Every 4 days. ' 
For San Luis Obispo, Santa Barbara, Los Angeles and San Diego: 5th, 10th, 15th, 
20th, 26th and 30th of each month. 

For Santa Cruz, Monterey, San Simeon, Cayucos, Gaviota, Santa Barbara and 
Ventura: Every Wednesday at 8 a.m. 
For Eureka, Areata, aud Hookton, Humboldt Bay: Every Wednesday, 9 o'clock. 
For Point Arena, Mendocino, etc.: Every Monday. 
Ticket Office, No. 214 Montgomery Street, near Pine. 
GOOD ALL, PERKINS & CO., Agents, 
Nov. 26. No. 10 Market street. 

FOB PORTLAND AND ASTORIA, OREGON. 

The Oregon Railway and Navigation Company and Pacific 
Coast Steamship Company will dispatch every four days, from Spear-street 
Wharf, for the above ports, one of their new Al Iron Steamships, viz. : COLUMBIA, 
OREGON and STATE OF CALIFORNIA. 

Sailing Days 
Aug 3, 7. 11, 15, 19, 23, 27, 31. I Sept. 4, 8, 12, 16, 20, 24, 28. 

At 10 o'clock A. M. 
Connecting at Portland, Oregon, with Steamers and Railroads and their connecting 
Stage Lines for all points in Oregon, Washington and Idaho Territories, British 
Columbia and Alaska. 

Ticket Office 214 Montgomery Street 

GOODALL, PERKINS & CO., Agents, 
Aug. 6. No. 10 Market street, San Francisco. 

CALIFORNIA AND MEXICAN S. S. LINE. 

For Ensenada, SCagrdalena Bay, Cape St. Lucas, ATaxatlan, 
La Paz and Guaymas. -The S. S. MEXICO (Thos. Huntington, Master) will leave 
for the above ports on SATURDAY, Aug. 5th, 1882, at 12 o'clock m., from Washing- 
ton-street Wharf. Through Bills of Lading will be furnished and none others signed. 
Freight will be received on Friday, July 28th. No Freight received after Fri- 
day, August 4th, at 12 o'clock m., and Bills of Lading must be accompanied by 
Custom House and Consular Clearances. For freight or passage, apply to 

J. BERMINGHAM, Agent, 
Aug. 5. No. 10 Market street. 

PACIFIC MAIL STEAMSHIP CO., PANAMA LINE. 

SPECIAL NOTICE. 

From and after this date, and commencing: with the 
Steamer COLIMA, August 4th, 1882, steamers for Panama will sail at 10 
o'clock a.m., instead of 12 m., as heretofore. Positively no Bills of Lading signed on 
the day of sailiug. WILLIAMS, DIMOND & CO., 
San Francisco, August 1, 1882. [Aug. 5. | General Age n ts. 

PACIFIC COAST STEAMSHIP CO. 

For Nauaimo and New Westminster, via Astoria and Port- 
laud, Oregon. The Steamer 

Victoria, 

Carrying Freight and Combustibles, will sail from Beale-street Wharf AUGUST 10th, 
at 2 p.m. GOODALL, PERKINS & CO , 
Aug. 5 General Agents. 

Just opened, choice Scarfs, Cravats and Hosiery, at Carmany's Shirt 
Store, 25 Kearny street. 



Aug. 5, 1882. 



CALIFORNIA ADVKKTISEK. 



16 



PACIFIC COAST AND EASTERN NOTES 

New York pool-seller charges a horse owner with bribing hia 

j.K'krvs t>' win race*. Hardly likely be would 1-rilx- them to li««- — — 

It.b luk'-r-'U said t<> have l«>nt all bit mosey. HeeenatiU fall buck on 

" 11.11."— -Defaulting bank-tell low, nurcnden, Ready |o 

b* whitewashed. ■ Mormon BJahop H-turu* htUD BntOpfl with nine fe- 
male oonvarta. Deoee of amaaher, that!— Mexican shoots a Deputj 
Sheriff in Texa*. Judge Lynch hun the Mexican op to dry.— One- 
eyed bookkeeper runs away with $3,000 from a OfaioegO Bnu. Being de- 
ficient of eyesight, he couldn't djstin£uiah between what was his and 
what was bin employer's.^— Fore*t tires in Michigan are "burning 
fiercely." Tboaa MUobigan forest fires always do burn. It's a habit they 
— The Tariff Commission commences ita labors at Long Branch. 
Tin- li.'tcl tariff at Long Branch is pretty stiff, and needs revision.— 
try Chandler ordara a Naval Retiring Board to convene at Mare 
Island. The necessity of this is not apparent. There is no American 
Navy at Mare Island, or Anywhere, to be retired. —Two shooting 
affrays at Portland, Ammunition wasted and nobody hurt. Coroner 
don't approve of such bad marksman ship. (Governor of Oregon com- 
mutes the sentence of a murderer who had the misfortune to be con- 
victed. The Governor ought to have pardoned the poor fellow, and di- 
rected the jury to apologize to him. -^— Blind man cuts his throat in Co- 
lusa County. Goes it blind into the next world, as it were.^— I [ous • in 
Virginia Citv burns up. The one occupant saved herself, but couldn't 
save the fire because it was too hot. ^— Sheep- raiser murdered and robbed 
in San Luis Obispo County. Murderers unknown, which saves the 
country the expense of goinjj through the farce of a trial. -^Los An- 
geles getting ready to hold a District Fair. Lots of people would rather 
hold a Mechanic's Fair — daughter. ^^The St. Louis twelve-year-old 
murderer of his father fouud guilty. Poor boy!^— Yellow Jack makes 
his appearance in Mexico and in Texas.— —Twelve hundred and sixteen 
New Yorkers turn up their toes in seven days. The undertakers smile a 
solemn grin, you bet. ^— Dead wood rain-storm washts away §15,000 
worth of dust out of the sluice-boxes of a mine.— ^Chicago produce 
market breaks badly and the dealers lose their wits.— The Honorable 
Mr. Prize-6ghter Sullivan gets drunk in '* Bosting " and uses bad lan- 
guage.— Senator Hill worse. Mind wanders, while his body stays at 
home.— Senate refuses to provide money for the completion of the 
monitors. Cold day for Robeson and his crowd of contractors.^— Port- 
land young lady tries to drown herself because her father won't allow her 
to marry the object of her adoration. Cruel parent relents. Marriage 
instead of a funeral. ^—Mormon Bishop dies. Number of disconsolate be- 
reft widows not mentioned.— Tom Gardner threatens to start a first- 
class paper in Los Angeles.— Fresno man kicks another to death. 
Whisky.— —Fire in a Sacramento furniture store. Stock damaged $2,000 
worth. The stove is the only piece of furniture with which tire agrees. 
■ 'Washington correspondent concocts an untruthful yarn about Cap- 
tain Hooper, of the Corwin. This is what is called newspaper enterprise. 
—Panama Canal Company said to be going ahead with great energy. 
—Watt's, the brutal mate of the Gatherer, for whom San Quentin 
yawns, says he has been slandered. He isn't that kind of a girl at all,— 
Nigger lynched in Missouri. Tried to outrage an old lady.— Dr. Wil- 
son, of Providence, R, I., Beduces a young lady, and now the Court com- 
mands him to show cause why he should not pay the young lndy S50.000, 
and ber stern parent another SSO.000.^— Season's crop in California phe- 
nomenally large.*— -Flour mill burns up in New York. Million 
dollars- worth of property and a number of people cremated. -^—Promi- 
nent citizen of Boston dies of paralysis. Bullet wound in the back of the 
head explains what produced the paralysis. Explanations as to who pro- 
duced the bullet wound are not forthcoming.-^— One hundred and thirty- 
eight people die from heat in New York. In the bottomless pit they are 
Bald to live for ever and ever, although the thermometor registers more 
than it does in New York.— Mr. J. W. Mackey returns to the Corn- 
stock and announces his intention of superintending the North End 
mines for a month or so. The curb-stone operators would like to be able 
to tell his intentions.— ^Telegraph operator at San Bernardino clears out 
with $72. If he had stolen a bank or a telegraph company it would be 
all right, but such a miserable petty thief should be sent to the peniten- 
tiary for life.— Robeson is seen in the House of Representatives with 
his arms around Rosecran's neck. Yum ! Yum ! What a sweet old 
hair-pin to hug.^— Idaho stage robbers bcood in 32,000 and the treasure 
box. Fair day's work,^— 'Guild, the amiable old gentleman who eloped 
with a sixteen-year-old child some years ago and then deserted her, passes 
over to that land where there is neither marrying nor giving in marriage. 
^— The Chicago, Burlington and Quinuy Railroad contemplates building 
a line westward from Denver, which will reduce the time from ocean to 
ocean thirty-six hours.— President vetoes the River and Harbor bill. 
Bully for the President !— Chicago grain speculators all tangled up.-^ 
Rivers and Harbors Bill passed over the President's veto. Too much 
solid stealing in it.^^Civil Service Reformers meet and talk. Mean- 
while My-dear-Hubbell Bcoops in the assessment-contributions.*^— Luna- 
tic leaves $100,000 to a college in which none of the students smoke. 
U. S. Government is organizing a search party to discover the institution. 
Some say they will find it in heaven, where the lunatic has just gone. 
—Illinois Greenbackers sympathize witb Arabi. So does little Mahone, 
of Virginia, Judge (!) Toohy and all other scrubs of that stripe.— -A 
Chicago packing company stops killing hogs. Many residents of that city 
no doubt breathe easier. ^—Lightning strikes Milwaukee in several places. 
Lightning badly hurt, town all right.— Four elephants break out of a 
circus at Troy, and scare the valor out of the Troyjans.— Three cow- 
boys raise Cain in an Arizona town. Now there is another cowboy in 
heaven. 

LOCAL NOTES. 
Fruit packers complain that they can't get enough female workers* 
Female workers complain that they can't get all the employment they 
want. Somebody's fibbing.-^— State Horticultural Society discusses 
fig culture and the science of " budding." The figs and the buds have no 
chance to reply. If they had, God only knows what they would say 
about the Society. ^— David Nye objects to the Mayor's veto of his R. R. 
franchise ordinance. Nobody expected that he would bave approved of 
it.^— Supreme Court upsets a criminal conviction on the ground that the 
Judge who presided at the original trial didn't define the exact meaning of 
"a reasonable doubt." Should have told the jury that it meant "If possible, 



let the criminal escape."— Forty «i\ < 'hinamen demand jury trial in the 
PoUot »'<>iiit. Court eOEDDroiDJMI by [mpoaing email line* on one half 

and letting the rent go rather than ond< die of trials. Dloe* 

1 1. .\ wit "f juatice.^— Saloon-keeper puti ■ ballet through his head. 
Wouldn't have blown bis bralna nnt onljr hn hadn't anj. ' ■■Man take* 
hi* money oat of the bank and hi. Irs it in ;i graveyard iSvfl Hpirits draw 
the gravedigirer'* attention to the " plant " in order that he may steal the 
name. ^—Supreme Court grrea Clarence Crav, the Santa Barbara mur- 
derer, a new trial. Of course !— Robert llerlit/. ejkl the Superior 
Court to dissolve the matrimonial bond which binds him to his wife, on 
the ground that he wiw Impelled into the matrimonial yoke through fear 
of the young lady's father and brother, and not because of bis admiration 
for herself. Whence this fear, Dob?— —Another nuisance created by the 
dumping of garbage at North Beach. The city authorities hhould be 
dumped into this pond of filth. ■ Sueath says "No. thank you," to the 
Stockholders' Committee of the defuuet Merchants' Exchange Bank who 
attend to examine the books. ^—Frisky widow swallows an ounce of ox- 
alic acid. Had heavenly aspirations. Doctor postpones the soul's flight. 
Republican County Committee discusses the harmoniousness with 
which the Seventh Ward is inharmonious.^— -Truesdell House on fire 
once more. Badly frightened lodgers float around the corridors in very 
airy costumes at an early hour in the morning. ^^ Western Addition 
burglar sends a stolen suit of clothes back to the owner. Any respectable 
burglar would be ashamed to wear the garb of a resident of the Western 
Addition. -^La Solidarite Society turns out to be anything else but 
right solid — so it disincorporates.— R, S. Bird charges Mrs. E. E. 
Savage with grand larceny. This kind of a bird would make 
any one Savage.*^— A fifth-rate coast steamer strikes the Mexican gun- 
boat Democi'ata, and cuts her down to the water's edge. The Democrata 
is evidently a dangerous vessel of war — to those who are aboard of her. 
— — Two purse -snatchers snatched by the minions of the law. — Naughty 
chambermaid caught in a man's room. Gets out through the window, and 
falls ninety feet. Eve didn't fall as far as that when she tumbled out of 
the tree of the knowledge of good and evil — Dr. Noble talks about the 
Bible and pob'tics. The average politician's Bible contains but one word: 
" Spoils."— U. S. soldier tries to burglarize Judge Allen's house. Judge 
shoots his little pistol off at burglar, who runs into a policeman's arms for 
protection. City Prison protects him now. ^—Secretary of War sends 
word to Colonel Mendell to blow up the Escambia. Wrecking Company 
had better hurry up or their money will go so high it will never come 
down any more.^— Supreme Court declines to re-open the Spring Valley 
water case. Call and Bulletin, as usual, file dissenting opinions, and say 
the Supreme Court is a horse thief. -^ IT. S. Circuit Court declines to re- 
mand the R. R. tax cases back to the State Courts, where the Judges 
would be coerced by demagogism.^— Benicia Flour Mill Company in- 
corporates.^— Colonel (?) J. J. Tobin declares, at a meeting of the Land 
League, that the Repression Bill was concocted in hell. His knowledge 
of what goes oa in that country is doubtless accurate. Some other flannel 
mouth should now get up and allege that the diabolical crimes which this 
bill is intended to repress were concocted in heaven. —Judge Field inti- 
mates that the McKew Laundry Ordinance is perfectly valid. ^—Stock- 
holders in the Merchants' Exchange Bank fire Sneath out. ^—Police force 
raid the gamblers. Have to do it once in a while to save appearances. 
^^Personnel of the employes in the Branch Mint shaken up. Frank 
Page hasn't left the country. ^^The mates of two different ships arrested 
for cruelty — that is to say, for maintaining discipline with the persuasive 
assistance of iron belaying pine, etc.— -Avjer Head sails away and there 
is weeping and wailing in every local room attached to the city Press. Re- 
porter weepeth for his item and refuseth to be comforted. ^— New Com- 
missioners determine to spend $50,000 in planting a forest, and making 
tracks and drives for speeding fast horses, in the Golden Gate Park.-^— 
Groceryman asks a clerk in the License Collectors office to pay a bill of 
So. Clerk thumps the groceryman. Easy way to pay bills.— Man dies 
in the What Cheer House of calcification of the heart, and every hard- 
hearted man in the town feels a cold shiver run down his back.^— Bing ! 
Bang ! A domesticated lawyer, who makes beds for a living, shoots a 
gambler. Frisky old landlady at the bottom of the matter. ^— Sneath 
yields up the Bank's property, but doing it necessitates a terrible effort. 
He had got to look upon the property as his own. 



FOREIGN NOTES. 

Arabi Pasha proposes terms of peace. The day of reckoning is com- 
ing, and he feels that his assets are not equivalent to a settlement. ^— De 
Lesseps does his best to thwart the British Government in its efforts to 
protect the Suez Canal. French residents in Egypt disgusted with him. 
—Spanish Government expresses the hope that the time has arrived 
when the Powers will recognize the claim of Spain to be consulted in re- 
gard to the Suez Canal. So it has, Seilor Don, but it seems to be a cold 
day for anything further than the formality of a consultation on that 
subject.^— Miss Anna Parnell falls ill of a brain fever upon hearing of 
the sudden death of her sister. Chickens will come home to roost. She 
had scant sympathy for the sister of Burke and the relatives of the other 
victims of Irish murderers. -^London Lloyds gives up the ship Hermes, 
235 days out from Glasgow to San Francisco, as lost. Underwriters will 
give up about $150,000 on that proposition.-^— The Sultan of Turkey or- 
ders 15,000 troops, and several ironclads, to proceed to Egypt. Gladstone 
says that if the Porte doesn't undertake to place them under the British 
command, Admiral Seymour will escort them home again. That sounds 
like business. — French Chamber of Deputies refuses to vote money to 
send troops to Egypt. The French Eagle turns out to be a disguised 
buzzard. ^^ Arabi Pasha dons the green turban of a descendant of the 
Prophet. In time he will develop and become the Prophet.— -De Les- 
sens says he will resist the landing of British troops along the Suez Canal. 
He will throw his tongue at them.— Germany likes the action of the 
French Chamber of Deputies. The French Ministry doesn't ; it resigns. 
^— Italy declines to take any of the Egyptian pie. Afraid.-^— American 
R.R. securities booming in Europe. Metaphorically speaking, the ladies 
want them and the babies cry for them. ^— The Khedive tells the British 
to occupy as much of the Canal as they feel like. At the present time 
they are not likely to ask anybody's permission to do what they think 
necessary.— Arabi's army gains its first victory. It captures a middy. 
^— Lord Salisbury says the British House of Lords is " an unrepresenta- 
tive body." The noble lord must surely bave found that out years ago. 
[Continued on Nineteenth Page.] 



16 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER AND 



Aug. 5, 1882. 



REAL ESTATE TRANSACTIONS. 

Recorded in the City and County of San Francisco. California, for 
the Week ending July 31, 1882. 

Compiled f'romthe Rearrdsofthe Commercial Agency ,401 California St., 8. F. 



Tuesday, July 25th. 



GRANTOR AND GRANTEE. 



J. 



DESCRIPTION. 



A J McCabe to Mary Ann McCabe 

Same to Agnes J McCabe 

Land Inv Co to Cbas L Hinkel 

Cha8LHinkel to W Tonjes 

Land Inv Co to CL Hinkel 

City and Co S F to L Altschnl .... 



Chaa L Hinkel to Marg Kelly 

Unknown Owners to W S Hobba. 



W S Hobbs to Chae Eleinclaus. . . . 
M C Gorbam to J A Barhara 



Portion of Outside Blocks 362, 364, 165, 
198, 199, 302, 305, 262. 263, 264, 267, 265 % 

Portion of Outside Blocks 363, 300, 303, 
304,200,266.265 

Ke CheBley, 225 nw Bryant, ne SO x se 
30, being in 100-vara 273 

Sw Chesley, 90 nw Bryant, nw 50x80, 
being in 100-vara 273 1 

SwCbeeley, 90 nw Bryant, nw 80x120, 
being in 100-vara 273 

N Pacific, 100 w Baker, w 166:10, n 137:6 
e 25, s 4:10?i, e 6, n 3, e 44, a 132:4 to 
beg; n Pacidc, 346:10 w Baker, n 79:6 J$ 
w 17:11, n 188:7, e 24:5, a 127:8V. e 8:2, 
a 137:6, w 30 to beg, being in Western 
Addition 575 

Ne Cbealey, 225 nw Bryant, ne 80 x se 
40, being in 100-vara 273 

E Valencia. 235 n 19th, n 25x80, being in 
Mission Block 68 10 

Same 125 

N Beaver,jl00 e Castro, e 25, n 25, a 114 
to beg, being in Mission Block 117 . . . 



Wednesday, July 26th. 



O F Von Ehein to Harry G Trull, 
J as A Church to Sarah L Cburcb. 



A R Totherob to Joel .Tola anson . , 
Jean B Pon to Jean P Pon 

Mary J Blair et al to N K Mas ten. 



Wm Winter to Peter Quinn 

M J McCarthy to Mary J Lovell. 



Geo Martin to Chaa W Zahn 

E N Torrey to Julius C ReiB 

Michl M Buckley to D P Marshall 

Hib Sava and Ln Soc to H Pottet. . 

GastaveReia to R Rasmussen 

J Laidley et al to Henry A Leake. 



S 24th, 58 e Guerrero; e 25x85 $2,500 

Undivided % s Oak, 55 w Lagona, w 
27:6x120, being in Western Addition 
219 800 

E Reld, 97:6 s Washington! s 40x50," bfr- 
iug in 50-vara 830 1,600 

S Pacific, 114 e Taylor, e 21x80, being in 
50-vara 658 2.800 

N corner Silver and Third, nw 70x50, 
being in 100-vara 85 10 

S Army. 215 e Sanchez, e 25x114 1 

E CaBtro, 118:41-100 n Market, n 55:67- 
100, s 65:125-1000, aw 83 to commence- 
ment 1 

E Pennsylvania Avenue, 87:8 s Sierra, s 
27:3x108:11 -Potrero Block 321 250 

W Sacramento and Laguna, w 34:4x127: 
8— Western Addi tiou 236 500 

Geary, 150:6 w of Scott, w 81x137:6 — 
60-vara 455 4,250 

Freemont, se 137:6 x 137:6-50-vara 735" 3,250 

Nw Cortland ave and Idahoe avenue, wi 
200x296, portion blk 3, Barman Tract | 1,400 

E Loui'a, 100 n Sierra, n 25x100— Potre-| 
roNueva479 1,001 

Portion sundry Outside Lands I 3,100 



Thursday, July 27th 



AuBtin D-Moore to Robt Balfour. . 
Nicola Arata to G Demartini 



Sav and Ln Soc to Mary Parsons. 
A JDonnellto T A C Dorland,... 
La Soc Francaise to ChaB Brogan, 
H F Williams to Lacy B Page 



H H Noble to Grace Noble. . 



Ne Jackson and Laguna, e80xl27:8H, 
being in Western Addition 194 

Undivided % w Union place, 95:2 s 
Union, e 21:2x58:9, being in 50-vara 



Abraham MagnestoMosee Magnes 
C C Cook to John Fennesay 



N Jackson, 47:6 e Polk, e 45xl27:81i .be- 
ing in Western Addition 20 

E Sauchez, 110 n 17th, n 25x93, being in 
Mission Block 95 

Sw Hampton place, 125 se Folaom, se 
150x55, bein°: in 150-vara 42 

Lots and blocks in O'Neil and Haley 
Tract; Haley Pnrchaee; Garden Tract 
HomeBtead ; Pleasant Valley Home- 
Btead ; Butchers' Tract and South 
Beach blocks 12, 17 

|N Waehington, 137:6 w Octavia, w 137:6 
x255:4#, being in Weatern Addition 

N 16th"! 60 *w Mission, w 82x160, bein, 
in Misaion Block 35 

N Sacramento, 134:9 e Pierce, e 28x128, 
being In Weatern Addition 391 



1,100 

11,000 

650 

17,000 

25,862 

18,000 

Gift 

1 



Friday, July 28th. 



Chas H Coggins to Geo Edwards.. 
Wm Haley to Michl C Haley 



Sarah J O'Connor to M E Donelly, 



Same by Trustee to Same 

Thos Mclnerney to G W Bnmett. 

Geo Hearst to Elizabeth Hawes. . 

L Gottig to Chas Matthews 

N K Masten to Jno C Wilson . . . 



L Atschnl to City and Co S F.. 
city and Co S F to J E Mason . 



E W Bnrr et al to Geo W Dean. . 
A M Davis to Sophie Davis 



Alex Riddock to H Pichoir 

Rlchd F Harrison to Jno A Buck. 



Land Inv Co to Geo B Bradford . 



S Jersey, 75 e Sanchez, e 25x124 S 

S Broadway, 77:6 w Leavenworth, w 20 
x60, being in 50-vara 1196 

Se Dopont and Adler. a 40x72; aw Mont- 
gomery Ave and Adler, w 46:0?4, a 40, 
e 79:82a, nw 52:0 s a to beginning, be- 
ing in 50-vara 67 

Same 

E Sansome, 102:6 s Broadway, a 35x77:6 
being in 50-vara 318 

Nw Napa and Connecticut, wl00r75,be- 
ins in Potrero Block 231 

S Ridley, 167 w Guerrero, w 25x90, be- 
ing in Miasion Block 25 

N corner Silver and 3d, nw 70x90, being 
in 100-vara 85 

Streets, etc 

Sw Maripoaa and Connecticut, a 163:9 x 
100; nw Solano and Connecticut, w 
200x72:6, being in Potrero Block 233. . 

Lots 29, 30, 6, 5, Tiffany and Dean Tct. . 

EStevenaon.llO s 19th, a 25x80, being 
in Mission Block 67 

Lots ti, 18, College Homestead Assd 

W Potrero Ave, 100 8 Solano, a 25x100 ; 
e Jersey, 100 a Solano, s 25x100, being 
in Potrero Block 62 

Ne CheBley, 115 nw Bryant, nw 55x80, 
being in 100-vara 273 



1 
18,200 



10,000 
1 



Gift 
200 



Saturday, July 29th. 



GRANTOR AND GRANTEB. 



Edward Sayer to Cath Spencer 

Mary E Donnelly to J G Ziegler . . 
Same to Henry Wagner 



W "Winter to Pierre Prietand wf. . 
Abner Doble to Almon D HodgeB. 



Jos F Clark to Abner Doble . 

A J Gunn lson to Same 

M M Estee to Same 



Jno Center to Mary Beicke 

Benjamin Schlosa to David Cahn. 



DESCRIPTION. 



W Beale, 27:6 n Folsom, n 22:6x75, be- 
ins in Beach and Water 442 and 442. . 

Sw Montgomery Ave, 25:10% se Adler, 
ee 25:10&, w 79:4^ , n 20, e to beg 

Sw Montsomery Ave, 25:10?i se Adler, 
nw 25:10%, w 46:4%, 8 20, e 62:10 to 
beginning 

N O'Farrell, 137:6 w Powell, w 63x137:6 
being in 50-vara 953 

Se Union and Scott, e 126:6, s 148, e 11, 
a 127, w 137:6, n 275 to beg, being in 
Western Addition 419, aubj to mort- 
gage for $6,500 

Ne Scott and Green, e 137:6x127, being 
in Western Addition 419 

Ne Scott and Green, n 137:6x137:6, be 
ing in Western Addition 419 

Se Union and Scott, b 148x127:6, being 
in Western Addition 419, subject to 
mortgage for $3,500 

E Shotwell, 107:6 n 23d, n 5x97:6, being 
in MieBion Block 138... 

S McAllister, 150 e Broderick, e 25 x 
137:6, being in Western Addition 512. 



3,500 
5,000 

5,000 
25,500 

10,445 
5 
1 

5,000 

200 

1 



Monday, July 31st- 



Louis Centhure to A Piepenburg. . 
J B Reinstein to Cath Himmelman 



Cath Himmelmann to Geo Waas.. 
Jno P Ley se 1 1. to And J Morr i eon . 



W Hale to C N Couaens 

Caroline Lauensteln to A Anstett. 
A Himmelmann to J B Reinstein . 
Morris PP Wolf to Same 



Chas M Greene to Connell Cabill. . 
J Center to Chaa H Knownburg. . . 



Edwd C Lovell to Herman Boese.. 
City and Co S F to C Knownburg, 



C Knownburg to Oity and Co S F. 
A Piepenbnrg to T Bacigalupi . . . 



W J Gnnn to Jno J Stephena 

Geo W Prescott to Geo L Bradley. 
Arnold Stabl to Matthew Kavanagb 
L Schen to Market St Cable R R C 
Chaa Patterson to Theo Knoll 



E Kearny, 52:6?i a Union, a 18:2?ix60, 

being in 50-vara 383 

Ne Kate and Steiner.n 72x81:8, being In 

Weatern Addition 373 

Same 

S Sacramento, 157:1 w Jones, w 19:7 x 

77:6, being in 50-vara 1129 

Sw Sutter and Webster, s 27:6x93, being 

in Western Addition 310 

N Green, 160 e Mason, e 21:6x60, being 

in 50-vara 367 

Ne Kate and Steiner.n 72x81:3; w Ma- 
son, 30 n O'Farrell, n 85x80 

S McAllister, 114:6 w Buchanan, w 23 x 

137:6; neSteinerand Kate, n 72x81:3; 

w Mason, 30 n O'Farrell, n 85x80 

W Dame, 375 s 30th, s 25x125; lot 87, 

blk 27, Fairmount Hd Aasn 

E Folsom, 215 s 22d, a 55x122:6, being 

in Mission Block 139 , 

Lot 11, blk 312, S S F Hd and R R Asn 
E Folsom, 215 s 22d, s 20x122:6, being 

in Miasion Block 139 

Streets etc 

E Kearny, 53:6>i V Uni'oii', s 18:254x60* 

being in 50-vara 483 

W 8th ave, 100 s Clement. 8 25x120, be- 
ing in Onteide Land blk 189 

N Baeh, 68:9 e Leavenworth, e 45:10 I 

137:6, being In 50-vara 1139 

N Ellis, 150 w Lasnna, w 25x120, being 

in Western Addition 229 

N Pulton, 137:6 w Lott, w 137:6x137:6, 

being in Western Addition 650 

Lots 37 and 4, blk 157, New S S P Hd . . 



5 
2,400 

1,200 

1 

3,000 

1,515 

6 
760 



1 

1,700 



12.100 
6 



6,500 
435 



JOHN WIGM0RE, 

HARDWOOD LUMBER, 

SHIP TIMBER, LOCUST TREENAILS, 
Veneers and Fancy 'Woods, 

129 to 147 Spear St. and 26 and 28 Howard St., San Francisco. 

[April 8.) 

THOMAS PRICE'S 

ASSAY OFFICE AND CHEMICAL LABORATORY, 

524 Sacramento Street San Francisco. 

Deposits of Bullion received, melted Into barn, and returns 
made in from twenty-four to forty-eight houra. 
Bullion can be forwarded to thia office from any part of tlie interior by express, 
and returns made in the aame manner. 
Careful Analysis made of Ores, Metal, Soils, Waters, Industrial Products, etc 
Mines examined and reported upon. Consultations on Chemical and Metallurgical 
questions. March 20. 

LEE CRAIG, 

SEARCHER OF RECORDS, 

Notary Public and Commissioner of Deeds, 
316 Montgomery Street - Bet. California and Fine. 

Commissioner for New York, Arizona, Nevada, Pennsylvania, Utah, Oregon, Idaho 
Washington Territory, Ohio, Massachusetts, New Hampshire, Illinois, New Jersey, 
and other States and Territories. DEPOSITIONS A SPECIALTY. Acknowledg- 
ments taken and oaths administered at any hour of the day or night. 

May 13. LEE D. CRAIG 

ROBERT WALKINSHAW. 

Kt*at. ESTATE AGENT 407 Montgomery Street. 

Farming, Mining and City Property. 

[July 29.] 

BRITISH BENEVOLENT SOCIETY OF CAL. 

Attendance, dally, from 10 a.m. to 1 p.m., by the under- 
signed, to receive subscriptions and donations, and to furnish all information 
relating to the Society. J. P. McCURRIE, Secretary, 

Oct. 23. Room 4, No. 531 California at. 



Repairing Matches and Jewelry, No. 39 Third Street. 
[July 22.1 »■ L- LEVY. 



Aug. 6, 1882. 



CALIFORNIA ADVERTISER, 



17 



NOTABILIA. 



THE PEDDLERS SONG. 
L*wn &* whltv u driven «now ; OoU qoorpi and «t<>uifcchor», 

CrprvM bUck u c*cr **.- antra ; Rn mv taidl (" |lw their dean; 

OIovwm mii m J»iii»Mk rosea ; Ptni Mid pokinj rttckj "f - r 

M»k* far fcNi and fur no*ea ; \\ bat mud! lack from hia.l to hoe) : 

Uut;le-brac«lrl, MoUare, «JiiU-r ; OaaMbavOI IM,OOmi uiobuy, 

Perfume (or a lady '■ chain Ikt ; liny. Wis. OT UM TOOT !*>«-' 

______^___^__ William SiuiutrKAitit. 

It was a mighty Nimrod who laid: " I never fail to brin^ down my 
l-ir.l." To the qneation: " How i* it when yoni goo mfwwi tin.-?" be re- 
plied: " I fetch it with th.> other barrel." " But suppose your other bar 
rel misses?" <|uerirtl his persistant questioner. " In that case— why, 
ilamn it, sir, I shnnlil whale the dog, and send $2.50 and my photograph 
to the NXWS Lima MsOALLIOnCoUPANV. In return I would n-cfive 
100 phott>KT»ph medallions, already gumuieil and perforated, and just 
the sue of a postage-stamp. 

" You look cheerful, Mr. Snifter," said a friend who met the old gen- 
tleman ambling down the avenue. "Yes," said the interrogated; "I 
have just h;ni a troublesome grinder pulled," and when the sympathizing 
gentleman asked if it hurt him much, Seth cheerfully responded, '* Not a 
bit ; it was an organ-griuder, and a policeman pulled him. No cranks 
but myself about my premises. 

" Vy, Adolpb," says Mrs. Felderstelderberger, at the Hotel del Cram, 
" you hef been helped tree dimes to dot sherry pies, und you will be 
sicks!" " Xeffer mind," says Mr. Felderstelderberger, " I bay four dol- 
lar mit a day, und Adolph is entitled to a whole pie. anyhow." Then 
the waiter snickered, and the old maid with the corkscrew curia, who sat 
in the far corner, remarked that every one who desired to obtain pure 
and unadulterated liquors should go to P. J. Cassin & Co. 'a, corner of 
Washington and Battery streets. Families supplied in retail quantities 
at wholesale rates. 

A man who invested ten dollars in a lottery is mad because he didn't 
draw SIO.000, and denounces the concern as a glaring fraud. If every 
man who invests $10 in a lottery was to receive ten thousand in return, 
we should never hear a word about such concerns being swindles. It is 
a wonder the managers never thought of this. 

An advertisement in a woman's paper reads: " An intelligent, neat, 
orderly woman, who has partly lost her voice and speaks in a whisper, de- 
sires a situation to take care of china and do the light work of a family." 
It is rumored that she has had forty-seven marriage proposals since the 
advertisement appeared, and that she is getting her photograph taken at 
the celebrated Bradley & Rulofson's gallery, corner of Montgomery and 
Sacramento streets. Messrs. B. & R., it ia admitted, take accurate pic- 
tures and finish them in exquisite style. 

The following advertisement appears in a theatrical paper : 
"Wanted, grotesque dancerB ; gentlemen not less than eight feet nine 
inches in bight." " A long engagement," says the advertiser, " to suitable 
parties." This is tall enough for America.— Court Journal 

We have heard of a country girl who couldn't corner a pig, but an 
exchange notes that a beautiful young lady in Atchinson, Kansas, has 
limbs so crooked that her blood can't circulate, and another tells of a man 
with legs so crooked he was obliged to have his pantaloons cut with a 
circular saw. The story about the Atchinson girl may be true. We 
don't like to call an unknown man a liar, therefore we will merely remark 
that Noble Bros., 042 Clay street, are the best house and sign painters in 
San Francisco. 

The flat hat that is bo prevalent at this time is liked by the young 
men who wear it because they can reach over the edges and hold it on 
with their ears when the wind blows. 

"By jingo!" exclaimed Brown, "did you read this heroic act of a 
gunner on the Invincible, who picked up a lighted shell and put out the 
burning fuse?" " Pooh! " replied Jones, " I saw that feat at the Califor- 
nia Theatre last Winter ; give us something fresh, or else go off to De La 
Montanya's, Jackson street, below Battery, and buy your wife one of 
those delightful Arlington Ranges. Every one says the Arlington is the 
most perfect cooking apparatus ever constructed." 

"Is it injurious to eat before going to sleep?" asks a correspondent. 
Why, no, not fatally injurious; but you just try eating after you go to 
sleep if you want to see a circus. — Burlington Hawkeye. 

" We are living in a grand and wondrous age," remarked a railroad 
passenger to the stranger who occupied the seat beside him. " Invention 
is rampant everywhere." "Yes, said his companion, "that's about 
what I observed to a witness in a divorce suit against me recently ; there 
are more liars to the square yard now than there used to be to the acre ; 
but White, the celebrated hatter, of 614 Commercial street, still continues 
to make and sell the most stylish and durable hats ever producedin this 
country. " 

The lens takes its name from a bean of peculiar Bhape. Is this the 
reason so many Boston people wear glasses ? — N. Y. Commercial Adv. 

"Magnificent promises sometimes end in paltry performances." A 
magnificent exception to this is found in Kidney- Wort, which invariably 
performs even more cures than it promises. " Mother has recovered," 
wrote an Illinois girl to her Eastern relatives. " She took bitters for a 
long time, but without any good. So, when she heard of the virtues of 
Kidney- Wort, she got a box, and it has completely cured her liver com- 
plaint." 

Parents should teach their children to imitate the example of lawyers 
in making their suits last as long as possible.— Oil City Blizzard. 

J. F. Cutter's Old Bourbon. — This celebrated whisky is for sale by 
all first-class druggists and grocers. Trade mark — star within a shield. 

The hot weather has had the effect of crowding all the watering- 
places, with the exception of Wall-street. — Puck. 

Best pictures taken at the Imperial Gallery, 724^ Market street. 



There was a yoatu girl snd her name was Maud, 
And BBS wanted t.. p) on tbs Htagu ; 

She had JtVt come hack fr-mi 1 trip abroad, 

And she thooght sbVd l«> nil the rage. 
She had a new play that ihs studied every day 

Prom tli>- tarsal oi sarlj dawn ; 
H.t nerve was great, but Vm sorry to relate 

Tin- poor tvl couldn't '*oatofa on," 
She struggled so hard with her great new play 

She soon became worried ami worn ; 
She went on the "road," far, far away, 

And ut last she was left forlorn. 
The manager skipped, and the cash he nipped, 

And no one knew where be had gone ; 
She saw his coat-tail as he flew over the rail, 

But the poor girl couldn't "catch on." 
She captured the heart of a rich old gent, 

For she had most bewitching ways ; 
He followed her round wherever she went ; 

O! those were ber golden days. 
But the old-man died, and his would-be bride, 

With her diamond ring in pawn, 
Sank under the blow, and gave up the show, 

For the poor girl couldn't " catch on," 

The " Congregationallst " tells of a school committeeman who told a 
class in grammar, " You should uever use a preposition to end a sentence 
with." This reminds us of the other school committeeman who said that 
the auxiliary " had " hadn't ought to be used before " ought," but that the 
Imperishable Paint, which is sold by J. R. Kelly & Co., Market street, 
below Beale, comes already mixed, covers three times the space that 
ordinary paint does, and is impervious to sun or rain. 

"Where is your father, my child?" "Oh, mamma, I suppose he's 
gone to take a drawing lesson from Mr. Gaiboy, for I heard him tell papa 
that if he would come to his room for a little draw he would show him 
how to catch any card in the deck." 

" So. that's Congress water, is it ?" exclaimed Deacon Brown with in- 
effable disgust, as he ejected the water from his mouth. " Well, p'raps 
'tis ; but you can't make me b'lieve Squire Smith ever drinks any o' that 
stuff, unless he disguises it in old rye purty thurrerly." Then the Deacon 
scratched bis ear thoughtfully, and remarked that ladies and gentlemen 
who desire to get delicious pies, ice-creams, confections, etc., should go to 
the Original Swain's Bakery, 213 Sutter street. 

The British having failed to dam the Mahmoudieh canal in time, are 
now attempting to d — mn Arabi instead. 

Lynn, Mass., always was a good place for health, but it has become a 
modern Bethesda since Mrs. Lydia E. Pinkham, of 233 Western Avenue, 
made her great disdovery of the Vegetable Compound, or panacea for the 
principal ills that afflict the fair creation. This differs, however, from 
the ancient scene of marvelous cures in this important particular: The 
healing agent, with all Its virtues, can be sent to order by express or mail 
all over the world. 

In addressing an assembly of ladies and gentlemen it is only neces- 
sary to say gents, as they embrace the ladies, and both the ladies and the 
gents drink Napa Soda. 

ENGLISH COKE. 

Best Old Company's Sugar Loaf 

Lump Lehigh Coal. 

Anthracite Egg Coal. 
Cumberland Coal, 
Pig Iron and all 
Steam ivraci House Coals. 

For Sale in Lots to Suit, at US' LOWEST MARKET RATES. 

BLACK DIAMOND COAL 

M'G CO., 

Corner Spear and Folsom Streets. 

F. N. JTeuval. W.S.Somervell. 

PACIFIC ASPHALTUM COMPANY. 

Established 1865. 

Proprietors of the Celebrated Corral de Piedra Aspnaltum Mine. 

(San Louis Obispo County). 

Dealers in Crude and Refined 

ASPHALTUM, FELT AND ROOFING MATERIAL. 

Prepared Asphaltum for Country Orders always on hand. Contractors for Side- 
walks, Roofs, Floors and General Aspnaltum Work. All Work Guaranteed. 
Office and Depot ,420 Jackson. \ Branch Office, 422 Montgomery, 8.F. 

PROF. JOS. JOSSET, 

Graduate of the University of Paris; Ex. Professor or De 
la Mennaia' Normal, France; late of Point Loma Seminary, San Diego. Pri- 
vate LesBons in the French Language. Residence: 1114 Stockton street, between 
Pacific and Jackson. At home from 12 to 2 p.m. Private Lessons given at the res- 
idence of the pupil. Dec. 6. 

WANTED, 

The present address of Peter MacHencle, son of Alexander 
Mackenzie, late of Easter Lays, by Inverness, Scotland, who was employed 
about the mines in Placer County about four years ago. If any person knowB where 
he is, please communicate with Alexander MacKenzie, 60 Academy street, Inverness, 
Scotland. Other papers please copy. July 22. 



18 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER AND 



Aug. 5, 1882. 



BIZ. 



When the Produce Exchange Call Board was first established, Febru- 
ary 27th last, much interest was expressed by merchants in general, and 
various were the opinions given as to its ultimate success and its 
influence respecting the Grain markets of the Pacific Slope, and even 
before the business was fairly inaugurated opposition to it sprung up from 
a new and unexpected quarter — the Stock Exchange Board inoculating 
the Grain Call theieto and adopting the title of the Grain Exchange. 
Both Boards have now been in existence 60 days, more or less. The latter 
is looked upon more as a speculative field for operations in "Futures," 
with very little Grain actually delivered, but differences or market varia- 
tions Bettled with coin, unless actual delivery is declared and so registered 
at the time of purchase. Not bo with the Produce Exchange Call Board 
— here parties operating expect to handle the Grain. A statement has 
been furnished by the Secretary of the Produce Exchange as to the aggre- 
gate of sales made on Call from February 27, 1882, to July 31st— say 163,- 
783 tons Grain; value, 84,532,231 07. The Call sales for the month of 
July aggregated 45,570 tons of Produce sold — also 865,000 Grain Sacks. 
This we think a pretty good exhibit, and gives assurance of a growing 
traffic in the future. The result is plain to the close observer that at no 
distant day the selling of Grain in this city by sample, as heretofore, will 
be entirely done away with and the Grain business of the Slope transacted 
on Call. Already it is seen that the reporters of the daily Press confine 
their everyday reports to those of the Call, although samples are freely 
exhibited at the Produce Exchange, and the daily saleB thereof aggregate 
considerable. It is, however, to be remarked that, judging from the ex- 
ports to Europe and elsewhere, Borne of the largest shippers of Grain still 
find it to their interest to go into the interior — to Stockton or elsewhere — 
and buy from farmers or their agents direct, and then order the Wheat 
sent by Rail direct to Benicia, Port Costa or South Vallejo, where their 
ships have preceded them. 

Wheat and Flour. — Exports of both are free and liberal. The Spot 
price of good Shipping Wheat, SI 65@S1 75 $ ctl., and of Flour S4@ 
S4 50 for superfine grades, and Extras $5@5 50 $ bbl. 

Barley. — The receipts are free and liberal. The Spot price of Feed, 
$1 25@$1 35 $? ctl. There is very little doing in Brewing or Chevalier. 

Oats are in moderate Bupply. Spot lots sell from §1 75@$1 85 $ ctl. ; 
latter rate for choice old. 

Corn. — There is very little business; 50 tons of Nebraska Spot sold in 
lots at SI 47£@$1 50 tf ctl. 

Rye. — The nominal price for Spot lots, 2c. 

Hops. — The stock is well nigh exhausted. The new will soon be in 
market. A Sacramento grower haB sold and contracted for his crop at 
40c. ; others here and at the North have sold at 30@35c. 

WooL — The activity previously noticed has departed, and we are left 
with heavy stocks. The range of price, 15@25c. for common to good 
Fleece, 26@28c. for choice Northern. 

Hides continue in good request at 19@19^c. 

Tallow is wanted for export— a refined article quotable at 10@10Jc. 

Fruits.— Grapes in variety are now coming in freely; also, Peaches, 
Plums, Pears, Melons, etc. There is no end to the supply; quality good, 
and prices low. Canners are having all the choice fruit they can possibly 
handle, including Blackberries, etc. 

Exports during the wees: have been liberal, embracing several car- 
goes of Wheat to Europe, Flour to the Orient and elsewhere. We enu- 
merate some of the leading features: Pacific Mail steamship City of 
Peking, to Hongkong, carried 200 Chinese passengers, and for cargo, 
Flour, 11,263 bbls.; Quicksilver, 600 flasks; Sheetings, 1,182,000 yards, 
and other goods, value §185,370, besides treasure, $130,000. To Japan 
she carried assorted Merchandise, value 317,500. The bark Woollhara, 
for Sydney, carried August 1st., Flour 1,500 bbls., Wheat 2,000 centals, 
Lumber, etc., value §29,773. The British steamer Anger Head sailed 
August 2d for Hongkong, via Honolulu, carrying 402 Chinese passengers 
and little cargo, other than that in transit from Hongkong to Honolulu. 
The British ship Wosdale, hence for Liverpool August 1st, carried 
Flour, 1,561 bbls.; Wheat, 59,777 Centals; value $109,624. The ship 
Portland Lloyd, for Havre, carried Wheat, 37,109 centals, valve §64,103. 
The British bark Compta, for Liverpool via Magdalena Bay for Orchilla, 
carried Wheat 11,315 centals, value §19,235. The British ship Carnar- 
vonshire, hence for Liverpool, carried Wheat, 43,599 centals, value $,74- 
600. The brig Paloma, for Papeete, carried an exported cargo, value 
§19,454; also to Marquesas Islands General Merchandise, value §4,254. 
The British ship British Yeoman, h#nce for Liverpool, carried Wheat, 
64,234 centals, value §112,146. For the port of Guaymas the Holland 
brig Helena carried a full cargo of Lumber and Shingles, value §3,740. 
The steamer Dakota, for Victoria, B. C, carried general cargo, value 
§35,945; also, in transit the same, value §12,339. The P. M. S. S. 
Zealandia, bence for Sydney July 29th, carried Salmon, 4,650 cases ; case 
goods, 2,988 pkgs., etc.; value, §82,273; also, to New Zealand, Hops and 
Salmon; value, §4,578; and for Honolulu, Bread, Tobacco, etc.; value, 
§10,727 ; also, for Auckland, Salmon, 1,100 cases, etc.; value, §15,714; to 
Melbourne, Salmon, 500 cases; canned goods, 500 cases; Cigars, etc.; 
value, §11,184. The schooner Staghound, for Bonham Island, carried 
general merchandise, value §6,510 ; also, for Papeete, Bread, Flour, Lum- 
ber, Rice, etc.; value, §12,000; also, in transit same, value, §8,180. 

Imports during the week embrace the following: Steamer Dora, from 
Ounalaska to Alaska Commercial Company, Ivory, 857 Walrus Tusks; 
Furs, 115 pkgs.; Fur Seal Skins, 1,528; Fur Seal, 16 pkgs., etc. The 
Lady LampBon, from Honolulu to Welch &Co., brought 9,074 pkgs. Sugar, 
240 bags Rice, and 1,575 Hides. The German bark Stella, from same, to 
Williams, Dimond & Co., bad Sugar, 14,957 bags and 634 kegs. The 
Arabic, from Hongkong, brought 1,182 Chinese, and, for cargo, Rice, 
18,519 mats ; Tea, 1,084 pkgs.; merchandize, 718 pkgs.; also, in transit to 
go overland, Teas, 26,488 pkgs.; Silk, 162 pkgs., and 87 pkgs. merchandise. 
From New York we have ships David Crockett, 157 days ; Hecla, 139 
dayB, and St. Stephen, with general merchandise ; also, ship Yorktown, 
from same, with 2,760 tons Coal. The schooner Wild Gazelle, from 
Chomuagin Islands, brought 82,000 Codfish. British ship James Bolt, 135 
days from Cardiff, brought Coal and Iron. The British ship Centaur, 



from Liverpool, bad general cargo. The British steamer Suez, from Hono- 
lulu 9 days, had Sugar, 20,055 pkgs.; Rice, 8,337 pkgs.; Banannas, 478 
bchs.; Wool, 118 bales. The British steamer Sardoux, 79 hours from Vic- 
toria, brought in transit for Montreal 900 cases Salmon. British ship 
Nevens, 155 days from Hull, Eng., brought 6,807 Steel Rails. British 
ship M. & S. Cox, 172 days from Shields, Eng., brought Coal, Coke, Iron, 
Chemicals, etc. Ship Sterling, 153 dayB from Liverpool, had 2,200 tons 
CoaL 

Freights and Charters. — But few charters for grain have been written 
during the week. Ship owners for the most part demand 60 shillings and 
upwards to Cork, U. K., but exporters' views are not disposed to give 
these figures at present, consequently, but few new engagements have 
been entered upon this month. During the past few weeks several British 
steamers have loaded Wheat here for Europe and elsewhere, and it lookB 
now as though British iron steamers were in the near future to become an 
important factor in this grain carrying business. At this writing we 
have on the berth 25,000 tons register, against 58,000 tons one year ago. 
Disengaged, 48,000 tons here, and at neighboring ports, to arrive during 
the year, 285,000 tons ; same time in 1881, 367,000 tons and in 1880, 
174,000 tons. 

Bags. — There is a fair demand for Calcutta Grain Sacks, with sales at 
9|c; other kinds, 9@9^c. The stock here is well concentrated and in 
strong hands. 

Cement and Plaster are both higher. We quote Rosendale Cement, 
§2 75@§3 ; Portland do., §4@4 25 ; Golden Gate Plaster, §2 75@§3 ; 
Lime, §1 50 per bbl. 

Lumber. — There is a good local and export demand. We quote cargo 
rates, per 1,000 feet: Rough Pine, §18 ; No. 1 Flooring and Stepping, 
§27 50 ; Rough Clear Pine, §24 ; Rough Redwood, §18 ; Surfaced Red- 
wood, §28. 

Coal, Salt and Iron. — Stocks of each are excessive, causing low prices 
to rule. 

Provisions. — Butter, Bacon, Hams, Pork and Beef, as well as Lard, 
all rule high. The demand good, but stocks are light. 

Salmon. — The Oregon, from Portland, brought 4,230 cases, and the 
Columbia, from same, 3,555 cases. The British steamer Sardonyx, from 
Victoria, B. C. , brought in transit for Montreal 900 cases. In the absence 
of reported sales, prices are more or less nominal, viz. : From §1 42i to 
§1 47A $ doz. for Columbia, and §1 32i to §1 35 $ doz. for Sacramento 
Fish, f. o. b. Oregon shipments include 39,000 cs. to Liverpool per Edwin 
Reed, and the Wallacetown to follow will carry several thousand cases 
more. The ship Wm. H. Lincoln, hence for Liverpool, will carry 5,000 
cs., valued at §26,250. The steamer Zealandia, hence July 29th, carried 
6,640 cs., valued at §35,372. 

Sugar. — Imports heavy and stocks liberal — prices steady. We quote 
refiners' prices as follows: Extra Fine Cube, in bbls., 12Jc; (A) Crushed, 
in bbls, 12^c; (A) Loaves, in bbls, 12^c; Fine Crushed, in bbls, 12£c; Pow- 
dered, in bbls., 12£c; Fancy Extra Powdered, in bbls., 13£c; Dry Gran- 
ulated, in bbls., 12c; Confectioners' Circle A, in bbls., lljc.; Extra 
Golden C, in bbls., lie; El Dorado C, in bbls., 10fc; Mariposa C, in 
bbls,, 10|c: Golden C, in bbls., lOfc. For half -barrels, Jc. additional on 
all kinds; 100-lb. boxes, £c. do.; for all other boxes ^c. do. Terms, net 
cash on delivery. Prices subject to change without notice. No order 
taken for less than 25 barrels, or its equivalent. 

Rice. — Heavy shipments have lately been made by Chinese to Oregon, 
some 20,000 mats. We quote China, 5@6c. for all grades; Hawaiian, 4jj 
@5c. 

Wines. — We have lately received large shipments from France. This 
is surprising, considering the large and increasing local product. 

The overland shipments of treasure through Wells, Fargo & Co.'s 
express from July 1st to 15th, inclusive, and from July 16th to 30th in- 
clusive wtre as follows: 

July 1st to 15th, inc. July 16th to 30th inc. 

Gold Coin § 82,600 00 § 42,200 00 

Silver bars 27,500 00 48,000 00 

Silver coin 2,700 00 4,400 00 

Currency 20,000 00 35,000 00 

Totals §133,000 00 §129 600 00 

Same time in 1881 136,315 00 169,800 00 

Quicksilver. — Spot sales from the wharf continue to be made upon ar- 
rival at 37c. The exports for the week, by sea, were as follows : 
To Sydney per Zelandia, hence July 29th : Flasks. Value. 

J. B. Randol 100 §3,000 

To Melbourne per same : 

Redington & Co 50 1,425 

To Hongkong per City of Peking, 1st inst. : 

Wing Chong Wo & Co 600 17,340 



Totals 750 

Previously since January 1, 1882 21,648 



§21,765 
639,265 



Totals since January 1, 1882 22,398 §661,030 

Totals same period 1881 24,025 695,887 

Receipts since January 1, 1882, 26,724 flasks. 

Exports by rail during the month of June aggregate 490 flasks, of which 
224 flasks were shipped from this city. The total exports by rail for the 
first six months of 1882 were 2,963 flasks, of which 1,098 flasks were ship- 
ped from San Francisco. 

ST. JAMES HOTEL, 

SAN JOSE. CAL. 
TTtEB BEACH Proprietor 

This Hotel is elegantly furnished, with all the modern improvements. The rooms 
are large, airy and beautifully situated in front of St. James Park, next door to the 
Court Bouse. No expense has beeu spared in making this a First-class Hotel in 
every respect. 

American Plan Rates, S1.50 to $2,50 per Day. 

Apedal Prices by the Weeh &r Month. 
Coach and Carriage at Depot on Arrival of all Trains. 



Aug. 6, 1882. 



CALIFORNIA ADVERTISER. 



19 



FOREIGN NOTBS-Contlnued. 
— Steamship Oillerl, with a large number of passengers on board. 
catches lire while crossing the Atlantic Passengers pretty badly (lain- 
age<l in feeling, ship hurt to the extent of JIO.OOO.^— Parnell conde- 
scends to belli Gladstone through with the Arrears bill. Too utterly kind, 
isn't he '^—Ticket of six men driven by Egyptains. Enterprising press 
correspondents telegraph that a company ran away and left its arms bo- 
hind it.— Gladstone's Government gives the Lords a day or two to 
think their amendments to the Arrears Bill over and back down grace- 
ful! y. —Irish editor charged with publishing one of the blackguardly 
effusions of Uedpath, encouraging the murder of landlords. _ A few 
months in jail will, perhaps, teach him the propriety of refraining from 
encouraging others to commit brutal crimes. Engineer Melville starts 
on bis way home. He will be back in time to be investigated.— 
Indiana State Democratic Convention "arraigns" the Republican party jj 
and admires itself.— Georgia Republicans split. Spoils wouldn't go 
around.^— Floods in Ohio and Kentucky. Several people drowned and 
crops destroyed. California Floods don't do anything of that kind.-^ 
Salinas bad man knocks a policeman down and takes his pistol from 
him. Salinas good men turn out and capture the bad man. ^— -Young 
lady takes strychnine at Auburn. The inquisitive can inquire the rea- 
son when they reach the other side of Jordan.— British Admiral lands 
marines at Suez. De Lesseps, therefore, announces himself at war with 
H. B. M. Now look out.^— British War Office contemplates excluding 
from the lines the correspondent of the Daily Telegraph, who started the 
report that the Sixtieth Rifles had run from the enemy. -^An impris- 
oned Nihilist turns informer. Spins a terrible yarn. Russian officials 
can't Bee that this continuous turning "informer" by imprisoned Ni- 
hilists, with its attendant disclosure of dreadful and wide-spread plots, 
is simply a well-laid scheme to scare the hidden Czar to death. 

ELECTRICITY, ETC. 

— In connection with the six aeronautical ascents made on July 14th; 
nnder the auspices of the Municipal Council of Paris, Nature says: " Two 
of these balloons were connected by a telephone wire in order to keep up 
constant verbal communications. It is hoped that by sending up bal- 
loons so connected many interesting observations have been made for the 
velocity of sounds at different altitudes, the difference of temperature, of 
velocity, of wind and of direction, etc., as well as difference of electrical 
condition." 

•— Several private gentlemen have resolved to work the electric light 
for themselves in the London Buburb in which they reside. They have 
subscribed the money necessary to provide the requisite plant, and are 
about to lay on electricity to the houses of such of their neighbors as de- 
sire it, guaranteeing that they shall not be asked to pay more than the 
average amount of their gas bills. 

— The cost of supplying electricity for lighting and other purposes to 
one square mile has been stated by Dr. Siemens at 82,000,000, by Dr . 
Hopkinson at 81,000,000, and by Mr. Spottiswoode at 8500,000. 

Savings Banks. — From the semi-annual reports of our savings institu- 
tions we gather the following statement. The seventeen savings banks 
of California on July 1st., held 853,208,790 on deposit against 849,954,323 
same time last year, showing an increase of S3,254,4G7. The eight San 
Francisco savings banks have 846,369,692 on deposit against 843,476,335 
same time in 1881, an increase of nearly 83,000,000, thus showing that the 
gain has been principally in this city. Another evidence of a better state 
of affairs is a better employment of the available funds in the possession of 
these institutions, there being less money on hand at the present time 
than a year ago. The total resources of the incorporated banks located 
in San Francisco, aggregate more than 8100,000.000, of which the depos- 
its reach $70,734,786. The reserve funds are given at over 89,500,000, and 
the paid up capital stock amounts to S15,847,626. 

The new Exhibition building which has just been erected by the 
managers of the Mechanics' Institute is now completed, and was thrown 
open for inspection on Thursday evening last, It is an imposing structure, 
400 feet long by 200 feet wide, and admirably adapted for the purposes 
which it is designed to serve. Outside of the building, on the south side, 
there is a delightful lawn, which has been planted with trees, flowers, etc., 
the whole presenting a fairy-land like appearance. The next Exhibition 
opens on the 15th, and is expected to be an unusually attractive one, both 
to those who are looking for useful information and those who are billing 
and cooing. 

Messrs. J. M. Idtchfield & Co., the merchant tailors, 415 Mont- 
gomery street, are just in receipt of a large stock of Fall goods, carefully 
selected in the beBt markets by experienced buyers. They employ none 
but the most experienced cutters and the most reliable workmen. Gentle- 
men who desire to obtain stylish, well-made durable clothes should give 
them a call Messrs. Litchfield & Co. have also on hand a large stock of 
all the latest noveltieB in gents' furnishing goods. 

Every one who wants to enjoy a good health-giving dip in the Bay 
should go to the Neptune and Mermaid swimming baths, which are situ- 
ated at the foot of Larkin and Hyde streets. They are comfortable, 
cleanly and convenient of access. 

To Art Patrons. — It having come to our knowledge that bogus paint- 
ings are being circulated among the public bearing the name " Tojetti/' 
on behalf of our patrons we shall in future sign our pictures D. & E. 
Tojetti. 

The directors of the Canada Company, with the view of equalizing the 
the semi- annual dividends, recommended, at the meeting held on June 
22d. a dividend of 21. per share for the half-year ending July 18. 

State Fair.— The 29th California Exhibition at Sacramento commences 
September 11th and ends the 16th. Just five days devoted to sight-Beeing 
and horse-racing. 

Herr Bandmann, the well-known actor, en route to Singapore with 
hie company, has stopped at Hongkong to sue the editor of the Hongkong 
Telegraph, for libel. 



ANNUAL MEETING. 

The Regular Annual Itleetliifc or the N took holder* of the 
Martin Whitu Mining Oomi >p:uiy, 

i Novada Block, imary itrMt, 8an Francisco, Oi»iift>ni.a, on 

THURSDAY, the BuveuUjetith day of AUBUIt, 1882, at ihu hour of 2 --'dock ML, for 

i li>- |nir|MWe of oloctlntr a Board of Directors to sitvc for the ensuing- jinr. and tin* 
transaction of BUch othor busiiH^H iu< m.,v cmne before the mooting. Transfer books 
will dose »ii Monday, August 14th, at 3 o'clock r.u. 

J. J. SCOVILLB, Secretary. 
Ofttoo B oom 6ft, Weyadi Bloc k, s.m Frqnd aoo. California Aug- fc 

ASSESSMENT NOTICE. 

CHOLLAR MINING COMPANY. 

Assessment No. 9 

Amount per Share 26 Cents 

Levied July 17th 

Delinquent iu Office August 22*1 

Day of Male of Delinquent Stock Sept. 12th 

W. E. DEAN, Secretary. 
Office— Room 79, Nevada Block, No. 309 Montgomery street, Han Francisco, Cal- 
l or n in . July 22. 

ASSESSMENT NOTICE. 

SYNDICATE MINING COMPANY. 

Asaessment No. 4 

Amount per Share 16 Cents 

Levied July 19th 

Delinquent in Office August 24th 

Day of Sale of Delinquent Stock September 13th 

J. STADTFELD, JR., Secretary. 
Office— Room 26, No, 4L9 California street, San Francisco, Cal. [July 29. 

DIVIDEND NOTICE. 

Office of the Bnlwer Co u volt da ted Mining Company, San 
Francisco, July 25, 1882. — At a meeting of the Board of Directors of the 
above-named Company, held this day, Dividend No. 9, of Ten Cents (10c.) per share, 
was declared, payable on SATURDAY, August 12th, 1882. Transfer Books closed 
on Wednesday, August 2d, 1882, at 3 o'clock p.m. This dividend is payable at the 
Farmers' Loan and Trust Company, in Mew York, on all stock issued there, and at 
the office in this city on all stock issued here. WM. WILLIS, Secretary. 

Office — Room No. 29, Nevada Block, No. 309 Montgomery street, San Francisco, 
California. July 29. 

DIVIDEND NOTICE. 

Office of the Bodle Con. Mining Co., Room 62, Nevada 
Block, San Francisco, July 27th, 1882. — At a meeting of the Board of Directors 
of the above-named Company, held this day, a dividend (No. 9) of twenty-five (26c) 
cents per share was declared on the capital stock of the Company, payable TUES- 
DAY, August fifteenth (16th), 1882, at the office of Messrs. Laidfaw & Co. , New York, 
only on stock issued from the Transfer Ageucy in that city and at the San Francisco 
office only on stock issued here. Transfer Books will close on Wednesday, August 
9th, 1882, at 3 o'clock p. m. (July 29.) W. H. LENT, Secretary. 

ANNUAL MEETING. 

Office of the Risdon Iron aud Locomotive Works.— The an- 
nual meeting of the stockholders of the Risdon Iron and Locomotive Works 
will be held on MONDAY, August 7th, 1882, at 11 a.m., at the office of the Com- 
pany, southeast corner of Beale and Howard streets, San Francisco, for the election 
of Trustees for the ensuing year, and the transaction of ouch other business as may 
come before the meeting. [July 29.] L. R. MEAD, Secretary. 

DIVIDEND NOTICE. 

Office of the Silver King: mining; Company, San Francisco, 
August 2, 1882. — At a meeting of the Board of Directors of the above 
named Company, held this day, a Dividend (No. 32) of Twenty-five Cents (25c.) per 
share was declared, payable on TUESDAY, August 16, 1882, at the office of the 
Company, Room 19, 328 Montgomery etreet, San Francisco, Cal. Transfer Books 
will close August 9, 1882, at 3 p. m. 
August 5. JOSEPH NASH, Secretary. 

DIVIDEND NOTICE. 

Office of the Standard Consolidated Blinlngr Company, 
San Francisco, Aug. 2, 1S82.— At a meeting of the Board of Directors of the 
above-named Company, held this day, Dividend No. ii, of Seventy-five Cents (75c.) 
per share, was declared, payable on SATURDAY, August 12, 1882, at the office in 
this city, or at the Fanners' Loan and Trust Company in New York. 

WM. WILLIS, Secretary. 
Office— Room 29, Nevada Block, No. 309 Montgomery street, San Francisco, Cali- 
fornia^^ August 5. 

WM. H. V. CRONISE, 

Mining, JT.E. corner of Montgomery and California streets, 
No. S9. Office Hour s; 11 a.m. to 2 p.m. June 10. 

COKE CHEAPEST FUEL. 

Redaction in Price : Wholesale Price, 50 cents per barrel ; 
Retail Price, 60 cents per barrel, at the works of the SAN FRANCISCO GAS- 
LIGHT COMPANY, Howard and First streets, and foot of Second st. Jan. 12. 



Take the Autopnone to the country. Ichi BaD, aole agent, has all 
the latest airs. 

ZEITSKA INSTITUTE, 

NO. 922 POST STREET. 

Day and Boarding School for Tonus Ladles and Children. 
KINDERGARTEN. Next Term will commence July 24th. To secure admis- 
sion for boarding pupils, applications should be made as early as possible. 
May 13. MADAME B. ZEITSKA, A.M., Principal. 



DR. R. BEVERLY COLE 

Mas Returned from Europe, 

And Resumed Practice at Ms New Offices, 

218 POST STMEJET, above Itupont. [July 29. 



D 



REMOVAL. 

r E H Pardee has removed from 681 Clay street to 526 

1 'Montgomery, corner Clay. Hours, 10 A.M. to 3 P.M. Jul y 29 - 



L. LANSZWEERT, 

ANALYTICAL AND CONSULTING CHEMIST, 

360 FOVXtTH STBMET, S-UST FBAJTCXSOO. 

(July 15.] 



20 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



Aug. 5, 1882. 



COMMENTS ON FOREIGN AFFAIRS. 

Europe is still in suspense regarding the aspect of the Egyptian im- 
broglio. The English are sending troops to the front in formidable num- 
bers, but it must yet be some time before the opposing forces meet in 
actual battle. It becomes more and more apparent that England is de- 
termined to permit no interference, even from Turkey. The other Con- 
tinental Powers have left her to do all the hard work, and from them she 
now neither asks nor desires aid- From the Sultan she will not accept 
assistance, unless it is made entirely subordinate to her own purposes and 
instructions. England has taken the task and the responsibility into her 
own hands, and we may rely upon it that she will perform the former and 
accept the latter to her own satisfaction and emolument. 

Bismarck is playing a deep game, and he has need to. He has no real 
friends among the European Powers — nothing but enemies on front, flank 
and rear. Russia, France and Austria all watch and wait for the dismem- 
berment of the Empire he has carved out with the sword and cemented 
together with blood. In this dilemma Bismarck recognizes the import- 
ance of not adding England to the list of his foeB, and for this reason it 
is safe to predict that he will stand by John Bull when the question of 
" partition " comes up after the Egyptian war is over. We do not be- 
lieve that there will be Berious trouble between England and Turkey. 
The Sultan # cannot afford to quarrel with England so long as the Rus- 
sian Bear crouches open-mouthed at the gates of Stamboul. The Sul- 
tan'B dignity may be hurt, but he must and will swallow any affront 
rather than risk the loss of John Bull's guns and money. 

According to yesterday's telegrams, Childers, War Secretary, has in- 
formed the Commons that the question whether the correspondent of the 
Daily Telegraph Bhould be excluded from the British lines was under con- 
sideration. It was the Daily Telegraph that, in its second edition yester- 
day, told of the stampede of the Sixtieth Rifles during the night attack 
by the troops of Arabi Pasha. Such a despicable liar ought to be ex- 
cluded not only from the British lines, but from all decent society. It 
appears that, instead of a regiment stampeding, a corporal's guard drove 
back several hundred of the enemy. The most surprising feature of the 
hoax iB that the Telegraph should be the vehicle of such "news." The 
Telegraph has hitherto been a consistent supporter of English interests, but 
it can no longer claim to be so if it prints wanton falsehoods, that are evi- 
dently fabricated to cast dishonor on the old flag. Perhaps the Telegraph 
has a Fenian on its staff of correspondents. 

THE PRISON MANAGEMENT. 

An evening paper published in thiB city, which iB so rabidly Repub- 
lican in its sentiments that it frequently violates common-sense and 
common decency in its advocacy of them, has recently been giving the 
present administration of the State Prison a big " send-off " — and for 
the simple reason that the present is a Republican one. The fact that 
the present Prison administration is a Republican one does not, in the 
estimation of the News Letter, make it a particle better or a particle 
worse than it would be if it were of a different political complexion. The 
simple facts, however, show that the present Prison administration is, be- 
yond doubt, the most venal and unscrupulous one that has ever held 
office. The fact that the Prison Directors have, in defiance of common 
honeBty, sold the product of the Prison labor they control to their friends 
for one-third, and even less, of what it is worth, has been alleged over and 
over again in these columns and never denied. The disreputable transac- 
tions and gross mismanagement which was disclosed by the last investi- 
gation do not need to be repeated. The fact is, the present Prison 
administration is as bad and as corrupt as it well could be, and has been 
proven so. 

The Republican "organ" may howl that the Prison Directors have not 
expended all the appropriation which the Legislature provided them with. 
There is nothing very creditable in this. The Legislature provided too 
much money, and the Directors kindly returned to the State $25,000. 
They refused to steal that sum ; it was too small! Compared with what 
has been dishonestly made out of the manipulation of convict labor, it 
was a mere bagatelle. Besides, the gorged boa-constrictor will refuse to 
touch the most delicate morsel And then returning that 325,000 enables 
them to posture as honest men, and gives the " organ " a chance to whoop 
up " the Republican administration of the prisons." 

ALBION CONSOLIDATED MINING CO. 

The sworn statement, filed by the Eureka Co., required by law, 
shows the amount of ore worked for the Albion Co. for the quarter ending 
June 30, 1882, to have been 131 tons; gross yield, $3,511 72. The Eureka 
payB the Co. 67 per cent, of the yield, and charges 512 per ton for reducing. 
The net product was therefore 67 per cent, of assay value, §2,352 45, less 
working, $1,572— profit, 3780 45, or a fraction less than $6 per ton to 
cover cost of extraction, hauling, etc., and this from ore that the Super- 
intendent advises the company "yielded for assay about $51 25 per ton." 
Earnest persistent inquiries made of the courteous and accomplished Sec- 
retary have failed to elicit any information relative to the present finan- 
cial Btatus of the company — its present indebtedness and overdraft in 
bank — the manner of making shipments, whether the gross amount, draw- 
ing drafts from Eureka Co. for reducing, and other charges— nothing 
whatever as to the "salaries," "legal expense," "contingent," "tele- 
graphic," "traveling expense," "working," "incidental" and "extraordi- 
nary expense" accounts, etc., etc. We Bhall be in a position shortly 
to give our readers full and authentic detaih as to the whole of these 
accounts. 

The antecedents of the partieB controlling the destinies of the 
Albion are of such a character as to make dealers anxious to learn 
the whole truth, but the officers, knowing they will have the absolute 
management until June, 1883, appear to care but little for the wishes of 
shareholders or the Press, and are indifferent as to their reputation as 
honest and competent directors. We commend to their serious consid- 
eration the advice of that great American humorist, Josh Billings— "A 
reputation once broken may possibly be repaired, but the world will alius 
keep their eyes on the spot where the krack is," and, unlike Pioche's 
ghost, it may not rke again. 

" Mr. D., if you'll get my coat done by Saturday I shall be forever in- 
debted to you." " If that's your game, it won't be done," said the tailor. 



AMMONIA IN FOOD. 

Laboratory of Organic Chemistry > 

613 Merchant street, San Francisco, AuguBt 3, 1882. j 

Editor News Letter— Dear Sir: In reply to your request that I 
would "write an article showing the nature of preparations containing 
ammonia in relation to food— especially as to the wholesomeness, or oth- 
erwise, of that ingredient when used in the compounding of baking pow- 
ders," I would at the outset mention that, besides the liquid ammonia of 
the shops, there are three carbonates of it, of which both the single car- 
bonate, and, better still, the bicarbonate — because it yields twice as much 
carbonic acid as the single carbonate— are available in the preparation of 
light, unfermented bread. Either of them, or both together, alone or 
mixed with bicarbonate of soda, may be used without detriment either to 
the bread or the health of the consumer. 

On this subject there is no higher or more reliable authority than Dr. 
Arthur Hill Hassall, of London, whose works on " Food and its Adulter- 
ations " have for years enjoyed a world-wide reputation. 

The following is from the work just mentioned: 

"Unleavened and Unfermented Bread. 

There are two kinds of unfermented bread. 1. Common biscuit, made 
with flour, water, and, perhaps, a little salt only. 2. One in which 
substances are used to imitate yeast, with the latter of which only have 
we to deal at present. 

The substances used in the preparation of this kind of bread are bicar- 
bonate of ammonia, carbonate of soda and hydrochloric acid, or carbonate 
of soda and tartaric acid. 

Of these, by far the best is bicarbonate of ammonia. This is a volatile 
salt, and its great advantage iB that ifc is entirely, or almost entirely, dis- 
sipated by the heat employed in the making of the bread ; and thus the 
necessary effect is produced without risk of injurious results ensuing. 
When hydrochloric acid and carbonate of soda are used, common salt is 
formed, with evolution of carbonic acid. 

The preparations known as baking, egg and custard powders are combi- 
nations of carbonate of soda and tartaric acid, mixed with wheat flour or 
other kinds of starch, and the egg powders are often colored with tur- 
meric. 

Of these preparations the most objectionable would appear to be that 
made with carbonate of soda and tartaric acid, since the resulting tartar- 
ate of soda possesses aparient properties. For our own part, we see much 
less objection to the employment, in the generality of caBes, of a substance 
like yeast, which contains but little saline matter, and the vitality of 
which is for the most part destroyed by the heat of the oven, than in the 
use of acids and alkalies, for egg and baking powders. 

" Samples of ' baking powders ' examined by ub we found composed 
of tartaric acid and carbonate of soda, together frequently with ground 
rice or wheat flour." — p. 34-5 {London edition^ 1876). 

I do not think it needful to adduce any other authorities for the uses 
and effects of ammonia in the form of carbonate, or bicarbonate, in rela- 
tion to food at present. I would merely add, that as Dr. Hassall men- 
tions carbonate of soda, and not 6i-carbonate — tartaric acid, and not cream 
of tartar — he is only using common terms. It is the tartaric acid which 
sets the carbonic acid free, and produces the effect of lightness of the 
bread. 

In conclusion, I believe in the perfect wholesomeness of bread prepared 
with baking powder properly compounded with cream of tartar and bi- 
carbonate of soda ; whilst I indorse all Dr. Hassall says concerning the 
substitution of bicarbonate of ammonia for that of soda. Why it has 
not been generally used is, I presume, a question of cost of material. 

Yours respectfully, John J. Bleasdale, D.D. 

Late Chemist to Melbourne Hospital, and Chemistry member of the 
Central Board of Health, Victoria, Australia. 

Action of Alum on the Human System.— With reference to the use 
of alum, Dr. Dauglish has written: " Its effect on the system is that of a 
topical (local) astringent on the surface of the alimentary canal, producing 
constipation and deranging the process of absorption. But its action in 
neutralizing the efficacy of the digestive solvents is by far the most im- 
portant and unquestionable. The very purpose for which it is used by 
the baker is the prevention of these early stages of solution which spoil 
the color and lightness of the bread while it is being prepared, and which 
it does most effectually; but it does more than needed, for whilst it pre- 
vents Bolution at a time that is not desirable, it also continues its effects 
when taken into the stomach, and the consequence is that a large portion 
of the gluten and other valuable constituents of the flour are never prop- 
erly dissolved, but pass through the alimentary canal without affording 
any nourishment whatever." 

STEAM AND STREET RAILROADS. 

An election of officers of several of the Bteam and street railroad 
companies controlled and owned by the Stanford, Huntington and Hop- 
kins combination, was held recently, with the following result : 

Southern Pacific Railroad Company — Directors : Charles Crocker, 
President; C. F. Crocker, Vice-President ; Charles Mayne, W. V. Hunt- 
ington, N. T. Smith, Treasurer ; J, L. Willcutt, Secretary ; Moses Hop- 
kins. 

Los Angeles and San Diego Railroad Company — Directors : Leland 
Stanford, Charles F. Crocker, N. T. Smith, Treasurer ; J. L. Willcutt, 
Secretary ; E. H. Miller, Jr. 

Monterey Railroad Company — Directors : Charles Crocker, President; 
Charles F. Crocker, Vice-President ; W. V. Huntington, N. T. Smith, 
Treasurer ; J. L. Willcutt, Secretary. 

Market street Railway Company, of San Francisco — Directors: Le- 
land Stanford, C. P. Huntington, Charles Crocker, N. T. Smith, J. L. 
Willcutt. Leland Stanford, President ; Charles Crocker, Vice-President; 
N. T. Smith, Treasurer ; J. L. Willcutt, Secretary. 

Potrero and Bay View Railroad Company — Directors: Leland Stan- 
ford, President ; Charles Crocker, W. V. Huntington, Vice-Presidents ; 
N. T. Smith, Treasurer ; J. L. Willcutt, Secretary. 

Mission Bay Bridge Company — Directors: Leland Stanford, Charles 
Crocker, C. P. Huntington, N. T. Smith, J. L. Willcutt. Leland Stan- 
ford, President ; Charles Crocker, Vice-President ; N. T. Smith, Treas- 
urer ; J. L. Willcutt, Secretary. 

City Railroad Company — Directors: George Crocker, Pi-esident ; Wm. 
E. Brown, A C. Bassett, F. S. Dooty, E. C. Wright, Vice-Presidents ; 
N. T. Smith, Treasurer; J. L. Willcutt, Secretary 





California Adwttser. 




Vol. 33. 



SAN FRANOISOO, SATUBDAY, AUG. 12, 1882. 



HO. 5. 



ftOLD I'.AKS— 890®91O— KKfiNEDSavKR— lli®llj V oont. discount. 
^-* Me xicaD Dollar*, 8£@9 per cent. disc. nom. 

VsT Exchange on New York. 5c. t"' $100 premium ; On London Bank- 
ers, 49J3. ; Commercial, 495@4'Jjd. Paris, sight, 5-12J franca per 
dollar. Eastern Telegrams, 10c. 

■T Price of Money here, 6@ 10 per cent, per year — bank rate. In the 
oi«n market, 1@1J per month. Demand fight. On Bond Security, 
3<jj 4.J per cent, tier year OD Call. 

*»- Latest price of Sterling in New York, 486@489. 

PRICES OF LEADING STOCKS AND GOV. BONDS. 

Nom Francisco Aug. 4, 1883. 



Stocks and Bond: 

BONDS. 
Cal. State BonJs. 6's,'57 

,t Co. B'da, 6s, '5*. 
S. F. Cityit-'". B'ds,7s ... 

MonUr'v Av. Bonds 

Dupont Street Bonus 

Sacnunento City Bonus 

Stockton City Bonds 

Tuba County Bonds 

Marysville city Bonds 

Santa Clara Co. Bonus 

Los Angeles County Bonds. 
Los Angeles City Bonds. . . . 
Vln/a & Truckce R. It. Bda. 
Nevada Co. N. G. It. R. Bds 
Oakland City Bonds 

Oregon B4 W. u..nds, (Js.. 

S. P. R. R. Bonds 

U S.«a 

BASKS. 

Bank of California fex-dlv) 

Pacific Bank(ex-div) 

First Nationai(ex-div) 

ISHt KAM'K COMPANIES. 

Union (ex-div) 

Fireman's Fund (ex-div) 

California (ex-div) 



Bid. \Asked 



Bid. i Asked 



105 

N.mi 

Num. 

37 

40 

60 
105 

90 

90 
105 
100 
110 
101 
110 

ios 

105 
120J 

168 
125 
12S 

120 
128 
125 



Nom. 

Nom. 
45 
00 
52J 

100 
100 
107 
110 

103 
114 
125 
110 
106 
121 



1-5 



123 
132 
126 



56 

Nom. 

Nom. 
56 
2SJ 
52) 

115 

120 

65 
1191 
120 

109 



126 

127 
109 

96 
116 
98 

100 

100 

60 
Nom. 
Nom. 

67 

29 

65 

125 

85 

70 
120 
121 

112 



Stocks and Bonds. 

EtMfKASCB COMPANIES. 

Stat..' Investment 

Borne. -Mutual 

Commercial 

Western 

RAILROADS. 

C. P. R. R. Stock 

iO. P. R. h. Bonds.. . . 

t.'itv Railroad 

Omnibus R. R 

N. B. and Mission R. R. . 

Sutter Street R. R 

Geary Street R. it 

Central R. R. Co 

Market Street R. R 

Clay Street Hill R. R ... 

S. F. Gaslight Co 

Oakland Gaslight Co . . . 

Sac'to Gaslight Co 

Califor'a Powder Co 

Giant Powder Co (new stck) 

Atlantic Giant Powder 

Gold nnd Stock Tcleg*h Co. 
IS. V. W. W. Co. 's Slock.... 

S. V. W. W.Co' Bonds 

;[Pacific Coast S.S. Co's Stock 
California Street R R. 
Pacific Rolling Mills. 120, 125. Cala. Dry Dock, 55, 60. Safe Deposit Co., 47, 48. 
Vulcan Powder, 66}, 67J. Presidio Railroad, 72, 73. Safety-Nitro Powder, 10}, 
log. Central Gas Stock, 601. 02. Hawaiian Commercial Co., 62, 53. 
The demand for all really 6rst-class securities is greater than can be 
supplied at our quotations. The Gas stocks are, however, exceptions, 
while all the Powder stocks continue favorites, and are easily marketed. 
Andbew Baird, 312 California Bt. 

STOCKS. 

The natural and inspiring power in mining share traffic is hope and 
prospect for ore developments, but latterly the fear of frequent and large 
assessments seems to have become the grinding impulse. If the where- 
with to pursue work does not come from under ground, it must come from 
stockholders' pockets. The uncertainty and severity of these demands 
has recently had two most notable examples. The call of one dollar per 
share upon the holders of Ophir a short time ago nearly broke the back 
of the market, and yesterday the unexpected levying of thirty cents per 
Bhare, aggregating $162,000. as " ante " from Consolidated Virginia own- 
ers is a veritable cinch, which will nearly squeeze the life out of the 
stock, and also the m arket. 

Meteorological Summary, week ending 7:58 p. m., Thursday, Aug. 
10th:— Highest barometer, 30.067— 9th ; lowest, 29.854— 5th ; average 
during the week, 29.980; maximum temperature, 69— 10th ; minimum 
50— 9th ; average during the week, 57.7 ; highest relative humidity, 
93 per cent.— 6th and 7th ; lowest relative humidity, 58 per cent.— 10th ; 
average during the week, 78.1 ; prevailing direction of wind, southwest ; 
maximum hourly velocity of wind, 28 miles per hour, 6th, 7th, 8th and 
9th ; average weather during the week, clear ; rainfall during the week, 
.00 ; total rainfall, season of 1882-83, 0.00 inches. 

Latest from the Merchant's Exchange.— New York, Aug. 11, 
1882. United States Bonds^s, U9J J 41s, 1143 ; ex-5s, 101 ; ex-fe, 101*. 
Sterling Exchange, 4 86@4 89. Pacific Mail, 46J. Wheat, 118@120; West- 
ern Union, 89*. Hides, 24(§24A.. Wool — Spring, fine, 20 @ 32; Burry, 
15@20; Pulled, 20@45; Fall Clips, lo@18 ; Burry, 12@14 Lon- 
don, Aug. 11.— Liverpool Wheat Market, 9s. 8d.@9s. lid., Cal.; 9s. 8d.@ 
10s. 4d. Red Am. Spring. Bonds, 4s, 122J; 4Js, 116i; ex-6s, 102*. Consols, 
99 13-16. Money, — acct.; Silver, — ■ 

Our old friend, Henry George, has been arrested as an Irish suspect, 
and is cabling the fact all over the world. We have a great deal of sym- 
pathy for Henry. He ought to have been given quarters in the Napa 
Lunatic Asylum, at the State's expense, instead of being turned loose to 
find free board and lodging in an English jail. He ought to sue the Ban 
Francisco authorities for damages, on the ground that they failed to re- 
press his patriotic ardor with a strait-jacket. 



London, Aug. 1 1.— Latest Price of Console. 99 13-18. 



MARRIOTT'S AEROPLANE COMPANY, 

For Nnvlicnttiiff the Air. 

Office of the Aeroplane Company for Navigating the Air, 
chant street. Office hours from 1 to 2 p.m. 



M-r 



Orders for Engraving- in (he Photo-Eug-rnvlafr Proce** can 
now be exec n ted at the "Hews Letter** Office lor leas Hum 
half the cosi of Wood Engraving, and In one-hair the time. 
Remember, we Tarnlnh a hard metal Electrotype ready for 
the Pre;*?*. 



TABLE OF CONTENTS. 



Another DiatiiiLTiiirihutl Man Gono 3 

An rnnarrantcd Howl 10 

Biz 18 

British Power 5 

Comments on Foreign Affairs 20 

Cradle, Altar and Tomb 15 

Each Mother's Love lathe Best(Poctry). 10 

Electricity, Etc 5 

Foreign Notes 14 

Fashion's Voice 3 

How the Widow Got Left '20 

Is HCome? (Poetry) 5 

Literary Notes 9 

Local Notes 14 

Notabilia 17 

Obstructing the Sidewalks.... 10 

Our London Letter 13 

Pacific Coast and Eastern Notes 14 

Pleasure's Wand 6 



Real EBtaU Transactions 16 

Sporting Items 7 

Society 3 

Sunbeams 12 

Stocks 1 

St. Louis Chat 9 

The Noble Magician i 

The Crayopaquo 9 

The Drowned Girl (Poetry) 13 

Tin World, the Flesh and thcDcvil 8 

The Present Condition of Affairs 10 

Town Crier .11 

The Death of Judge Lake 2 

Too Much Zeal 10 

The New City Hall 19 

The Annual Health Report 15 

The Bombardment of Alexandria 2 

The Why and Wherefore of the Baking 
Powder Business 19 



Californians Abroad, July 15th, 1882:— Paris: C. M. Cottrell, 
Hotel Violet ; Mrs. Dussol, Hotel Dominici. London: Mr. and Mrs. 
R. H. Brown, Mrs. L. A. Brown, C. E. Bancroft, Miss Birton, E. M. 
Elliott. Geneva: Miss Houston, W. Melvin Smith. Rome: Mr. and 
Mrs. A. Tourney. Heidelbekg: Mr. Dewing.— Continental Gazette, Paris. 



Hawaii— Two more arrivals from the Islands. Bark Discovery, 22 
days, to Williams, Dimond & Co., with 13,250 packages Sugar, 918 bags 
Rice and 200 tierces Molasses. Brig John D. Spreckeh, 20 days from 
Kahului, has 7,100 bags Sugar for the California Refinery. 

From the Orient.— The O. and 0. steamship Oceanic, 26 days from 
Hongkong, arrived on the 9th inst., bringing for cargo: Tea, 4,649 pkgs.; 
Rice, 6,082 pkgs. ; Grain Sacks, 1,962 bales ; also, in transit for Eastern 
cities: Tea, 30,113 pkgs.; Silk, 443 pkgs., etc. 

For Honolulu. —The British steamer Suez sailed for the Islands on the 
9th inst., carrying passengers and Government mails, and for cargo a large 
line of general merchandise, including sugar, 4,500 lbs. refined ; coffee, 
5,940 lbs.; potatoes, 866 pkga.; bread, barley, canned fruits, etc. 

From Hawaii.— Two vessels arrived on the 9th inst., bark Helen W. 
Almy and Kalakaua. The former had for cargo: Rice, 1,907 bags; Sugar, 
3,306 pkgs., etc. The latter brought 333 casks Molasses and 5,093 pkgs. 
of Sugar. 

Messrs. Farnum and Litchfield, Bank Commissioners, examined 
into the condition of the Bank of Fresno, and also the Fresno County 
Bank, on the 5th inst. Both institutions were found to be in a healthy 
condition. 



Messrs. Litchfield and White, Bank Commissioners, on the 9th of 
August examined the Security Savings Bank of this city. The examina- 
tion showed that the affairs of the concern were in a flourishing condition. 

Wine and Brandy for New York.— The Pacific Mail steamship 
Colima, hence for Panama, carried en route to New York native grape 
brandy, 3,506 gallons ; native wine, 47,592 gallons. 

Dundee. — The British ship Mauteden, 114 days from Dundee, has ar- 
rived to Balfour, Guthrie & Co., bringing for cargo 1,450 tons Coal and 
500 tons Pig Iron. 

Portable engines of eight horse-power can be obtained in New South 
Wales for $1,300, but in "Victoria, owing to the duty, they cost $1,550 
each. 

Liverpool. — The British ship Dawpool, 125 days from Liverpool, is at 
hand with a full cargo of General Merchandise, to Balfour, Guthrie & Co. 

For Kahului— The brig Hazard carried for this island port a general 
cargo of merchandise, valued at $21,480. 

Tahiti— Schooner W. H. Stevens, to A. Crawford & Co., 40 days, has 
650,000 Oranges, etc. 

Entered at the Post-O0ce at San Francisco, Cat., as Second-Class 
Matter. 



Printed and Publlrted by th. Proprietor, Frederick Marriott, 607 to 616 Morchaat Street, Ban Frandico, Oallforala. 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER AND 



Aug. 12, 1882. 




THE DEATH OF JUDGE LAKE. 
"Judge Lake is dead." The announcement was as startling as un- 
expected. At first it seemed hard to realize that one who filled so large 
a space in our community, whose presence on our streets was but of yes- 
terday, and whose voice had been heard in our courts but a few hours 
previous, should have been so suddenly stricken down. Delos Lake was 

, from the interior of the State of New York, a district well known as the 
nursery of able lawyers, of whom he was one. He was born in 1820, ad- 
mitted to the Bar in 1842, arrived in San Francisco in 1850, where he has 
always made his residence. He was made United States District Attor- 
ney for California, by President Lincoln, having served a term as Judge 
of the Fourth District Court ; was County Judge of San Francisco, and 
was subsequently transferred to the Municipal Criminal Court. In all 
these positions he reflected honor upon the office. As a lawyer, Judge 
Lake had been thoroughly trained and disciplined before he came to this 
coast, and in that respect had a great advantage over many members of 
the Bar. He stood in the first rank of the profession, and though it is 
doubtful if his fees ever approached those of McAllister, Wilson and 
Hoge in magnitude, still he was highly successful, and, it is said, has left 
a handsome fortune to his family. In his social relations Judge Lake 
was noted for his good-breeding and kindly nature, the latter, however, 
sometimes clouded by the wit and humor that characterized him, and, 
unfortunately perhaps, too often took the form of satire, which, to those 

1 who did not know him intimately, gave offense. In the death of Judge 
Lake the community loses a good citizen, his profession a shining light, 
and his family, consisting of a wife, three daughters and a son, a loving 

■ guardian, protector and friend. 

The funeral of the deceased gentleman was held at Trinity Church on 
Thursday afternoon. The services were most impressive, and a large 
concourse of our leading citizens were present, including the entire Bar 
and Bench of the city. The following gentlemen acted as pall-bearers: 
Lorenzo Sawyer, John Garber, Hall McAllister, A. L. Bhoads, W. H. 

1 L. Barnes, Harry I. Thornton, Ogden Hoffmann, W. W. Cope, William 

, T. Wallace, Leland Stanford, William Alvord, William M. Gwin, J. P. 
Hoge, O. P. Evans, H. P. Williams, S. M. Wilson and S. J. Field. 

THE BOMBARDMENT OF ALEXANDRIA. 

The recent bombardment of the defenses surrounding Alexandria 
served for the British Government a great purpose outside of its results, 

i as an act of war, in the present conflict with Arabi Pasha and his rebel 
followers. The implements of naval warfare have, within the past twenty 
years been entirely revolutionized, and the utility, power and safety of 
all these new appliances have never* been tested in an actual conflict of 
sufficient seriousness to practically demonstrate their capacity and useful- 
ness. Of course these great ironclads and guns — th'eBe huge marine mon- 
sters — which the British Government has spent hundreds of millions of 
pounds in constructing, have been built upon the most approved scentific 
principles, and have been tested by every test that science could suggest. 
But still science is but theory, and the only thorough test for implements 
of war, whether they are designed for use on land or sea, is — war ; actual 
conflict. Until that test was applied the croakers could point to the Ger- 
man ironclad which run her sister ship down in the channel, to the Cap- 
tain, which went to the bottom in a very insignificant gale of wind, to the 
burst gun of the Thunderer, to the Doterel, and to a host cf minor mis- 
haps, and shake their heads with that mysterious solemnity which says 
nothing, but which insinuates a great deal. 

Then again it was alleged — and until the practical test was applied no 
one could tell how much of truth the allegation contained — that the 
modern appliances of naval warfare had reduced such conflicts down to a 
scientific basis, on which valor and persistence, two of the principal factors 
in producing British supremacy on the ocean, would be of little, if any, 
use. 

All these doubts and fears are now swept away. The bombardment of 
the defenses around Alexandria, although not as perfect a test of these 
moot points as might be desired, was sufficiently searching to enable the 
most commonplace judgment, to see that British naval power is greater 

1 to-day than ever ; that these great floating monsters are not vulnerable 
toysy and that- the fighting grit which defeated the Spanish Armada, and 

1 which prevailed over the enemy at the battle of the Nile, has not dete- 



riorated, and is still a potent factor in utilizing modern naval appliances 
and in maintaining for 

' l The flag that braved a thousand years the battle and the breeze " 
that supremacy which it won so long ago. The artillery power at the 
command of the Egyptians and British respectively was, it is true, very 
unequal. The British Admiral had at his command eight armor clads en- 
gaged, the Inflexible, Alexandra, Sultan, Superb, Temeraire, Invincible, 
Monarch and Penelope. These ships mounted four 81-ton. guns, fourteen 
25-ton, thirty 18-ton and twenty-four 12-ton guns, besides smaller pieces 
and Gatlihg and Nordenfelt machine guns. They were protected by 
armor-plating, which varied in thickness from 24 inches to 6 inches. He 
had also a number of smaller vessels which, like the Condor, rendered 
very effective service. The actual artillery strength of the Egyptian 
fortifications is a matter of some doubt to us, because the published re- 
ports have varied widely. We know, however, that they mounted quite 
an array of 18-ton gunsanda large number-of smaller pieces, and that, ' 
taken altogether, the number of harbors in the universe that are better 
fortified than Alexandria was before the bombardment is but small. To 
illustrate this we may mention the fact that there is not a single Ameri- 
can port so well armored. Therefore, although the power of the British 
fleet to stand a very heavy fire from the largest guns was not demon- 
strated, the fact was established that it is capable of battering down and 
rendering useless a very formidable series of workn, and that, too, in the 
short space of about eight hours. 

When the full details of this bombardment are critically examined it 
will be found that three points which have an important bearing on naval 
warfare have been brought out strongly. These are: The great protective 
value of armor-plating to life and to the machinery and fighting power of 
a ship; the necessity of making the heaviest guns the primary offensive 
weapons, and the difficulty of fighting with precision (and maintaining a 
watchful defense against small craft) through the dense smoke of a modern 
action. 

There is no question now but that the thinnest armored ships are of great 
value, notwithstanding the fact that they may occasionally meet with 
guns which would render their armor useless. This plating is still able to 
resist the fire of the great majority of guns that can be brought to bear 
upon it; and it can deflect and keep out the projectiles of light guns which 
might be brought against it in great numbers. The thin armor of the 
Penelope and Invincible seems to have been able to protect those ships 
quite as effectively as the Injlexible's did her. Had they been unarmored, 
or "freely penetrable" ships, as Sir W. Armstrong advocated in his 
presidential address before the Institution of Civil Engineers, there would 
probably have been a great loss of life, considering the fire these ships 
were under, and a disablement of some or all of the guns. The Invincible, 
which cost a quarter of a million, has been practically of as great defens- 
ive value in this action as the Inflexible, which cost over three-quarters. 
This does not prove that she is as good a ship for all purposes, but it 
shows that for many operations, including the present, this thinly armored 
ship is as useful as any other, and is very much superior to an unarmored 
vessel. 

With regard to the position of guns in the class of offensive weapons, it 
is clear that they must continue to hold the highest place. The ram and 
torpedoes, which are rightly advocated very strongly, are often of great 
value; but they are of no use in actions of this kind. It would be a mis- 
take to build many ships in which guns are done away with, or reduced 
in power, in order to develop more completely the full efficiency of 1 the 
ram and torpedo. Ships in which this is done can never be more than 
mere auxiliaries to a fleet. The present operation could not have been 
carried out, neither could that of several years ago when Sir Hastings 
Yelverton went in under the guns of Carthagena to bring out two Span- 
ish frigates, in defiance of the Junta of that town, with a fleet of torpe- 
does and rams only without guns. 

The difficulty of fighting the guns with precision, and of defending a 
ship against torpedoes and torpedo boats, will be very great after an ac- 
tion has once commenced, by reason of -the accumulation of smoke, and the 
time it takes to clear away. As soon as the ships began firing at Alex- 
andria a bank of smoke is stated by the correspondents on board to have 
risen like a wall, and prevented the results of the fire from being watched. 
From the very commencement it was so dense that nothing could be seen 
by those on the ships of what the enemy were doing, and it was only the 
sharp scream of projectiles overhead, and the upleaping of columns of 
spray as the shot struck the water that made it clear the fire was being 
returned. Order had to be given to cease tiring until the smoke cleared 
away. The wind and sun were both in favor of the Egyptians, and it 
was some time before the veil of smoke lifted sufficiently for even a 
glimpse of the shore to be obtained. This glimpse was lost the instant 
the guns again opened fire, and before it was possible to see where the 
shots struck. The only way to get a chance of seeing what was being 
done was by look-outs in the tops, but these are very frail refugees in a 
general action, and may easily be destroyed, and the look-out limited to 
the deck. This smoke difficulty will give the opportunity for torpedoes, 
torpedo-boats, and. any fast auxiliaries, in a general action. When the 
smoke has once accumulated, these craft will run in and endeavor to close 
with the large ships before they can be seen. Under some circumstances, 
if a favorable state of the wind is taken advantage of by a torpedo-boat, 
a vessel may have no chance of protecting herself. For this purpose ves- 
sels are required larger than our present torpedo-boats, which could sup- 
port themselves at sea for a time, and would be able to accompany a fleet 
aDd act as auxiliaries. 

The Industries of New South Wales.— -This work, by Mr. Charles 
Lyne, appeared originally in a series of articles under the title of " The 
Industries of the Colony," published in the Sydney Morning Herald. It 
is now reproduced in an attractive form, with seventeen illustrations, in- 
cluding a view of the City of Sydney from Circular Quay, and a colored 
map of New South Wales, showing the nature of the country in its pres- 
ent state of development, in gold-yielding and agricultural areas, pastoral 1 
lands and mineral districts other than gold, such as coal, copper, iron, 
tin, etc. The aim is to attract population and capital to that extensive 
and wealthy State. Issued from the Government press of New South. 
Wales, 1882. 

Thtr new food, which- has-cared- th«-chT©nie- dyspeptics- of- Japan; ir 
Midzu Ami (Japanese Malt), at Ichi Ban. 



\u,'. 13, 1882. 



CALIFORNIA ADVKRTISKH. 



:s 



SOCIETY. 



Auguit 10th, 1882: Everything still rvmains very quiet in socia 
circle*, i^-*'i >!*• sol v. t having, Apparently, shaken into their places at 
home a^'ain after their Summer wanderings. 

Next week the Mechanic*' Fair opens its doors in its new building fox 
the tint tiiue, an event which i* looked forward to with no little inter 
eat, and it will nerve, no doubt, to draw together DOt only thoso who are 
already in the city, but country visitors and those who still linger away 
from town. 

In the meantime I do not hear much talked of except the weather. 1 
which for the past day or two has been simply perfection, and the Park 
U crowded every afternoon with carriages, equestrians, pedestriaus and 
picnickers, all bent on enjoying it to the full. 

Another old pioneer, Judge Lake, has taken hia departure from this 
weary world of care, and left behind him troops of friends, in whose 
memories he will dwell as a valuable member of his profession, a brilliant 
conversationalist, an enthusiastic admirer of the beautiful, au accom- 
plished host and a firm friend— in other words, a scholar ami a gentleman. 

His funeral took place to-day from Trinity Church, which was filled 
with sorrowing friends of the deceased and his family, conspicuous among 
them being the Bar Association, which attended in a body. 

His pall-bearers were Gov. Stanford, Col. Hoge, Judge Evans, \V. W. 
Cope, Dr. Gwin, Wm. Alvord, Hall McAllister, Judge Sawyer, Judge 
Field, Col. Harry Thornton, H. B. Williams, Judge Wallace, General 
Barnes, and, of course. Judge Hoffman, ca va sans dire, for when did a 
funeral of note ever take place in 'Frisco at which that kind-hearted and 
eminent jurist did not officiate? 

In the death of Judge Lake society has also sustained a loss, in clos- 
ing the doors of a pleasant house where hospitality was free and un- 
bounded, and in depriving it of the company of hia agreeable wife and 
chatty daughters, one of whom, while inheriting in a degree her father's 
wit and powers of satire, has by no means relinquished her ambition 
of becoming in time a full-fledged authoress. Perhaps, during the period 
of her enforced retirement, she will produce something from her pen 
whereby we may regard what is now a deprivation (the loss of her so- 
ciety) to be in the end a real gain. 

Society will regret to hear of the business reverses of Mr. Brummagem, 
which thereby denies them of another most agreeable house whereat to 
visit. Old-timers will remember when the announcement of a party 
as about to be given by his accomplished wife was hailed with pleasure, 
as a " real good time " was always anticipated and had ; and this house 
closing is a double hardship, owing to the fact that his young daughters 
are just about entering society, and to them, at least, it must seem a 
terrible trial, which all hope will be but a temporary one. 

And still another pleasant little circle has been broken up — and this 
time a musical one — by the defection of Consul Olavonsky, who has 
betaken himself to the country to Hve, and will for the future content 
himself by only holding official residence in the city. 

Music-lovers will miss him, as his musical re-unions last Winter were 
some of the pleasantest features of the season. 

One of his chief assistants, too, has departed in the person of Dr. Axel- 
rood, who, having accepted an appointment as surgeon on one of the Chi- 
nese steamers, thus in a measure becomes lost to 'Frisco'B musical circles. 
But it is some time yet till the Winter season begins again, and who 
knows what may turn up in the mean time ? 

Theatricals at Mare Island are again looking up, and the late perform- 
ances given there are spoken of in terms of highest praise. 

Reversing the old saying, and going from "gay to grave," the Island 
was the scene of a sad service yesterday, when all that was mortal of 
Admiral McDougall was laid away to rest where, during his lifetime, he 
so long commanded, he having for many years been stationed there at the 
Navy Yard. 

Among the dinners given last week was one that I have heard spoken 
of in terms of both praise and censure. It was given by one of a party 
of very young* men, who pride themselves on their gastronymic knowl- 
edge, some of them going so far as to claim to be first-class cooks. 

To me it is pitiable to see young men give themselves to the pleasures 
of the table, and doubly so when they thus publicly acknowledge and 
seemingly glory in it — as the gourmet is, in my mind, always associated 
with the time when gout, rotundity and old age are three inseparables. 

I am glad to see that young Breckenridge, whose many friends in 
'Frisco will doubtless be pleased to hear it, is again coming to the front, 
having entered the arena of political life in Stanislaus County, where he 
has of late been practicing law, and where he has sought and obtained 
the nomination of District Attorney. 

His has been a most checkered life, first, till he met and married Lloyd 
Tevis' youngest daughter, when he seemed to have reached a haven at 
last. But something was wrong, and when the young people, after a 
time, "agreed to disagree," and separated, he, evidently disgusted with 
fashionable life, sought the plains and became an humble sheep herder. 

He is a man who is well fitted to shine in any circle, and now that he 
has once more emerged from his seclusion, I hope he will not be driven 
into it again. 

A. B. Spreckels, who recently completed a trip around the world, has 
just returned from a brief visit to the Sandwich Islands. 

William Matthews, the well-known and popular attorney, returned 
from a business visit to the East last week. 

The Schmiedells are back in town again, and to-day Ed. Newhall and 
his bride arrived from New York. Colonel Withington has also returned 
from the Sandwich Islands, coming by the last Australian steamer. 

Dr. and Mrs. McNulty are already tired of housekeeping, and can be 
found again at their old quarters in the Palace Hotel. 

I am glad to hear that Mrs. Ward has quite regained her health during 
her stay in Europe, and will soon now be returning to her friends in 
'Frisco. Felix. 

The Seventeenth Industrial Exhibition of the Mechanics 1 Institute 
opens in the new Pavilion, on the 16th inBtant, and promises tc be more 
interesting than any of its predecessors. In promoting trade and leading 
to the development of the resources of this coast, these exhibitions have 
exercised in the past a powerful influence, and there is every reason to ex- 
pect that in the future they will be still more influential. 



FASHIONS VOICB. 

The Parle warbler, who oftentimes nit* on my shoulder and pours his 
fashionable melodies into my ear, i« son tit to-day, end with my bend 
pOUMd despairingly on tnv hand 1 pull nil thecrimpi out of my hair en- 
deavoring to get an idea that ahull bo novel and strange. A handsome 
gentleman editor said to me the other day: "Silver Pen. can you give mo 
en Idea! I am dead broke." "No, I cannot," I replied. "I also am 
sailing in muddy water." "Well, I'm banged if I don't get full, then ; 
that will fetch it." When that paper comes out to-morrow, nous ivrroiit. 
But apropos of the voice that proclaims the reigning styles, I have seen 
some curiosities in hats which rath up Into the ;*ir K ntraight that they 
appear ready to fly heavenward at a moment's notice, while little flower 
capotes cover the skull like a cap. Then* made in small flowers or leaves 
are very pretty for fresh young faces, hut woe to the old lady who, for 
fashion's sake, makes herself ridiculous by appropriating such for her own 
wear. There is another hat in chip, which comes in every color under the 
sun— a kind of brigand's chapeau. The rim is wide and perfectly straight, 
while the crown is high and tapering, like a flower pot. The idea as to 
trimming is to weave a feather wreath round this crown, allowing one 
long plume to droop gracefully on the shoulder. The newest of all bon- 
nets is one named after the beautiful French woman, Madame Recamier. 
It is too sweet for anything — made of coarse ecru satin straw, which you 
may line with any colored velvet you please, myrtle-green being favored. 
Falling over, but not below, the brim is a frill of ecru lace, and this is 
surmounted by a band of velvet, which is placed round the crown and 
fastened in front by a huge steel buckle. From one side a cascade of 
flowers falls— the Oscar Wilde mementoes of Bimflower and lily, with an 
addenda in the form of some softly trailing vine, which droops over the 
back and rests on the shoulder. The brim of the hat is dented in front, 
and comes low over the ears. Here in piquant beauty you have the 
" Recamier " bonnet. By the way, velvet strings tie it down, with a bow 
below the left ear. This is an important finish. 

Ah! I hear the flutter of a wing, and so in softest melody the bird at 
my ear tells me that French costumes are daily growing more bouffant, and 
foretell a gradual return to the basket draperies of Marie Antoinette ; 
also, that dresses in China-figured satin surah are among the latest novel- 
ties. The grounds are dark green or maroon, strewn with tea roses or 
carnations, and the trimming is ficelle lace. The extremely pointed waists 
are now only used for evening wear, and the severity of the points are 
toned down by little puffings ot satin, narrower at the back than in front. 
Moire grenadine of two Btripes of contrasting color are made up with 
repped Victoria silk, or with glace surahs, which are shot in several col- 
ors and called chameleon silks. 

Fashionable women now dispense with jewelry for out-door wear, ex- 
cept two slim rings of gold, which are worn outside long gloves. Ear- 
rings for the street are quite obsolete, but still worn for full dress. A 
jeweled collar-button and cravat bow are worn at the throat, and if a 
breast-pin appears in lieu thereof it must simply be a slender gold bar. 

For foot-wear, Pompeiian red and black silk stockings are worn with 
the simplest and also with the most elaborate toilets, whether dark or 
light. Again, navy blue and porcelain blue, in a light shade, are among 
preferred colors. 

The cotton Batines, now so much used for house or seaside dresses, are 
quite the prettiest things to be seen. The colors are bo rich and effective, 
and when trimmed with velvet collar and cuffs, or tinted lace, nothing 
more charming can be imagined. The lighter shades may be trimmed 
with cream white embroidery, and tastefully effected by dark velvet bows 
here and there. Thus says the bird. What a relief it is to me that the 
charming songster came in answer to my half breathed desire for its pres- 
ence in the midst of my complications. And now, smoothing down my 
disarranged hair, and thanking birdie for ideas, I take leave with a smile, 
and bow until next week. Silver Pen. 



ANOTHER DISTINGUISHED MAN GONE. 

Rear-Admiral David Stockton McDougal, of the United States 
Navy, died in this city on Monday last, at the advanced age of seventy- 
three. The deceased gentleman was born in ChUlicothe, Ohio, on 17th of 
September, 1809, being a descendant of one of the signers of the Declara- 
tion of Independence, and a brother of the second Governor of this State 
under the Federal Government. At the age of eighteen he entered the 
Naval Academy at Annapolis, and made his first cruise as midshipman on 
the Natchez. From that time until 1855 he was sailing about the world, 
doing duty at different naval stations. In 1855 he came to this coast, in 
command of the Warren, and in 1857 he was placed in command of the 
new Navy Yard at Mare Island. In 1861 he took command of the 
Wyoming, of the Asiatic Squadron. In 1863, while in command of this 
vessel, he distinguished himself by vanquishing bix batteries and three 
Japanese men-of-war, under command of the Prince of Negato, in the 
Straits of Simonoski. In 1865, he again took charge of Mare Island. In 
1868, he assumed command of the South Pacific Squadron, and in 1871 
he was made a Rear-Admiral and retired, having attained the age of six- 
ty-two. Since then Admiral McDougal has made his home in this city. 
He has left a wife and two daughters behind him. His remains were in- 
terred at Mare Island, with appropriate naval honore, on Wednesday last. 

PAINE'S HOUSEHOLD ART 

.... AND.... 

BRIC-A-BRAC ROOMS, 

35 GOEA-IfcY STREET, S. E. 

I have purchased the stock and store lately owned by Mr. C. E. 
Locke, and am enabled to offer the choice collection of Floor and Wall 
Cabinets, Music Stands, Writing Desks, Tables, Easels, Pedestals, Fine 
Potteries, Porcelains, Bric-a-Brac, etc., iu all of the NEWEST wares 
and of the CHOICEST designs, at EXCEEDINGLY LOW PRICES. 

6S~ Visitors are cordially invited to inspect the Show-rooms, and will be politely 
received, whether intending buyers or not. 
E. PAINE, - - - - - 85 Geary Street 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER AND 



Aug. 12, 1882. 



THE NOBLE MAGICIAN. 

[ BT COUNT ST. GEHMAINE. ] 

Madame d'Esnenneail was the most beautiful woman of Paris. She 
was a widow, and very fond of me — at least it appeared bo. More than 
one pleasant note I received from her, and more than one pleasant even- 
ing I passed in her charming villa at Versailles. One day I received an 
amiable note — my fine widow invited me for the evening to a ball, and re- 
quested me to appear in my most elegant costume, in order to enhance 
the eclat of her fete. I felt somewhat flattered at her request. I tried 
my best to comply with it. You may believe that I looked somewhat 
younger at that time. 

My apple-green dress-coat, each button of which was a diamond worth 
one thousand louis, was not unbecoming. The pearls and jewels of my 
hat-braids could not be bought for twenty-thousand louis. I may have 
represented a million in jewels. In the evening I mounted my state car- 
riage. Five lackeys followed me, two leading the way with torches. We 
arrived at the villa of my lady friend at Versailles. I was surprised to 
find nearly all the windows dark, and no appearance of a ball. I demand- 
ed of the Swiss if Madame d'Esnermeuil was at home. He asked me in. 
I found the lady alone. She appeared as surprised to see me as I was not 
to find company. 

" Count, to what do I owe the pleasure of this visit?" 
"You commanded — I come to your ball.' 1 
" Impossible — you mistook the day." 

" I never mistake." And I took out the invitation and showed it to 
the lady. 

** True," she said at last ; " I made a slip of the pen. Pardon me, 
count, for my error, and do me the honor to sup with me!" 
"But you know, madame, that I never eat anything." 
" But you drink. I have delicious currant wine — you must taste it." 
My beautiful widow herself handed me a glass. It was not suspicion- 
people are not suspicious when in love — but an old habit, which made me 
take the glass with my left hand, on the middle finger of which I wore a 
mysterious ring, a souvenir which once King Solomon presented to me. 
On the lower side of the ring was a wonderful stone, and hardly had it 
touched the glass when it was shattered into a thousand pieces — the prec- 
ious currant wine of my lady friend was poisoned! At once I saw every- 
thing clearly ; but the more embarrassed the lady became the more unre- 
strainedly I continued to talk. I heard a carriage rolling away. Was it 
mine, which I had ordered away? Madame d'Esnermeuil perceived that 
I listened. 

" My old uncle returns to Paris," she said in confusion. 
It was my carriage. A lady's maid had sent my servants away — the 
carriage was to come for me at ten o'clock next morning. 

The confusion of the fair widow increased so much that she could hard- 
ly speak. A noise was heard in the corridor, then the steps of men. 
Madame became pale, and rose quickly to leave the room. 
" You will leave me, dearest ?" I said. 

"ExciiBe me, count," she replied, "I am wanted. I will return in- 
stantly. " 

And I looked fixedly at Madame with my magnetic eyes, in which at 
that time my whole powerful will was concentrated. Madame d'Esner- 
meuil Btood immovable. I touched her forehead with my magnetic hand, 
and she sank drowsily into her arm-chair. In this state of somnambu- 
lism she was forced to reply to all my questions— her most secret thoughts 
I could draw from her heart. 

"Madame," I said, "you intended to poison me with your currant 
wine?" 

" Yes ; it contained prussic acid." " And, Bince you failed ?" 
" I will have you murdered." " By whom ?" "By my servants." 
" Are your servants prepared for it?" 

"YeBj they are armed: in the corridor, awaiting the ringing of my 
belL" 

" How many are there?' " Five." " And when I have been killed ?" 
"Your magnificient diamonds will be mine." 
" It is well Awake!" 

My amiable somnambulist revived, without knowing what secretB she 
had betrayed. 

" I believe I have been asleep, count," she said, smiling. 
"Yes," I answered, "fully two minutes." 
" I Bee you desire to retire. I will ring." 
" You are very kind." 

Madame d'Esnermeuil rang violently. Immediately five men, armed 
with swords, burst into the room ; but already I had a magic pistol in my 
hand, and fired it at the bandits. Like pillars of salt the nice little party 
stood rooted there, and my charming widow, like the late Mrs. Lot, in 
the middle of them. I offered her a few more compliments, wrapped my- 
self in a dense cloud of ottar of roses, and flew away. 

The police next morning found her surrounded by her bravos, still root- 
ed in the same position. Cardinal Mazarin, to whom I was known 
through Maria Mancini, offered to the good city of Paris the pleasant 
spectacle of seeing the beautiful d'Esnermeuil and her band hanged. The 
Queen Mother Anna and the whole court were present. 

I possess, in addition to other magical preparations, a rejuvenating po- 
tion which may, under certain circumstances, become more dangerous 
than Maria Mancini. By careless use it once caused a dreadful breach 
between two loving hearts. I was some time since at the court of Ibrahim 
Lodi at Delhi. Soon I perceived that the Emperor was suffering under a 
great sorrow. I begged him to confide in me. He then told me that his 
favorite Empress, Ruizia, was growing old— that he Btill loved her beyond 
expression, and could not find it in his heart to depose her. This touch- 
ing love, this magnanimity, gained my sympathy. I told good Ibrahim 
that 1 would help him. He conducted me to the fair Ruizia. She wore 
pnrple-colored silk pantaloons, was seated on a carpet, and chewed carda- 
mom and behtel. Her complexion was rather of an olive-green tint, the 
inside of her hands and feet she had nearly died red, her eyes were sur- 
rounded by heavy black rings, and her chin daintily tattoed ; she smelled 
considerably of camphor — but these things are matters of taste. Kuizia 
no doubt was a great beauty, for my friend Ibrahim Lodi told me so — 
barring a slight defect, which could not be denied, and which is judged 
the same by almost any taste — poor Kuizia really looked rather antique. 
This I must and could help. I handed to dear Kuizia a vial of my reju- 
venating elixir, "Aqua Bendetta," with the strictest directions to take 



only two drops daily. The next morning Ibrahim Lodi was awakened by 
a plaintive whining — he rubbed his eyes in astonishment — really it was a 
child crying, and quite close to him. He sat up in a passion, for, like 
many other men of family, he did not like children's crying. He called 
out, " Kuizia! Ruizia?" 
No Kuizia replied, and the child cried piteously. 
It was actually in his very bedroom. 

Highly incensed, the Emperor hastily put on his wrapper and slippers, 
snatched his sword and pistols, and searched for the crying child. The 
voice came from Ruizia's bed, and no Kuizia was to be seen. 

Horrified, Ibrahim threw back the blanket — there lay a little girl, as 
small and olive-green-pinky as if it had just been born. 
The Emperor started as if thunder-struck I 
Where was Kuizia ? 

Ibrahim in his fear and excitement pulled down all the bell cords. 
The entire palace, the whole of Delhi, was in uproar, and searched for 
Kuizia — in vain. 

I hurried to the palace to offer to the good Emperor consolation and if 
possible assistance. He was almost raving with pain at the inexplicable 
disappearance of his Kuizia, and with rage at the more inexplicable cry- 
ing child! I was lead by him to the little maiden. He at first stuffed his 
ears with cotton — but for other reasons than the famous Odysseus did af- 
ter listening to the Bongs of the sirens. The poor infant continued to cry 
— probably it was starving with hunger. 

To Ibrahim's horror I took it in my arms— it smelled dreadfully of cam- 
phor. For closer inspection I took it to the window. The little creature 
had both of her fists closed as if in a cramp. Carefully I opened the little 
fingerB — in her right hand the child held a small ball of behtel and a few 
grains of cardamom — and in the left — how can you conceive my horror — 
the tiny vial, filled with Aqua Bendetta, I had given to poor Kuizia yes- 
terday. And the vial was entirely empty. 

A shocking thought arose — but to be certain, I took my lens and close- 
ly examined the face of the baby. Around the eyes were black beauty- 
rings, and the chin was daintily tattoed. 
Further doubt was impossible! 
I held poor Kuizia as a Buckling in my arms! 

In her raging anxiety to become young again, and without loss of time, 
on returning at night, she drained the vial. 
Consider my awkard position! 

Had I Baid to the Hon. Ibrahim Lodi: "Behold this baby is thy belov- 
ed Ruizia!" 

The barbarian in his Asiatic passion would have ordered me to be bas- 
tinadoed, and laid open my bowels with his own imperial hand after- 
ward. 

I therefore, with great coolness, restored Kuizia to her immense bed, 
and told my unhappy friend that the matter was really marvelous— that 
in the whole experience of my life I had Been nothing like it. 

In the same hour I left Delhi on board a flying machine which I had 
recently invented, and dropped from on high a letter of condolence to the 
poor Emperor, in which I explained the whole riddle, and advised' him to 
get without delay a wet-nurse for little Kuizia, because early and immod- 
erate indulgence in behtel, cardamom and camphor would certainly im- 
pair her future beauty. 

I never received a reply to my polite note, nor did I ever meet again 
my poor friend Ibrahim Lodi. The unhappy man became a victim to the 
darkest melancholy. If formerly he was not fond of his children, he now 
cordially hated them. Little Ruizia was not permitted to come near 
him. In pure weariness of life he went to war against King Babour of 
Kabul, and was killed in the battle of Panigut, on the 20th of April, 
1526. 

His body was with great ceremony burned on a mighty stake — with all 
his wives. Of course little Ruizia also shared this honor (because every- 
body knew that she had been Ibrahim's favorite Empress) although she 
was no bigger than a child of one year. Upon this disastrous event I 
pledged myself to confine the use of my rejuvenating panacea strictly to 
myself. I take a single drop of Aqua Bendetta on every change of the 
moon, and it agrees well with me, as I am now 986 years old. 



ENTERPRISE MILL AND BUILDING CO., 

Sawing, Planing and Manufacturing— Doors, Sashes, Blinds and 

Mouldings— Turning, Scroll and Jig Sawing— Counters, 

Bar and Store Fixtures. 

Finishing Work for Buildings on Hand and Made to Order. 

217 to 225 Spear SI., and 218 to 226 Stewart St., S. F. 

The largest and oldest established mill on the Pacific Coast. 

D. A. Macdonald, Prea't. R. S. Falconer, Sec'y- W. N. Miller, Supt 

[March 26.] 

WILLIAM T. COLEMAN & CO., 

MEMBERS OF THE 
PRODUCE EXCHANGE. 

123 and 125 Market Street, Sun Francisco. 

[July 29.] 



COLLEGE OF NOTRE DAME 

POR YOUNG LADIES. 
Conducted by the Sisters of Notre Dame, San Jose. 

This Institution will Resume Studies on 
TUESDAY August 1, 1882. 

The course of instruction embraces all the branches necessary to the acquisition 
of a solid and refined education. TERMS: Tuition, board, washing and bedding per 
quarter, $75. Music (vocal and instrumental), drawing, painting and private elo- 
cution lessons form extra charges. Fur further particulars apply to the 

Aug. 6. SISTER SUPERIOR. 

Repairing Watches and Jewelry, So. 39 Third Street. 
[July 22.1 D. L. LEVY. 



Aug. 12, 1882. 



CALIFORNIA ADVERTISER 



IS IT COME' 
la it come ? they s*y on the banks ot the Nile, 

Who looked for the world's Ion*;- promised day. 
And saw but the strife of Egypt's toil 

With the desert's sands and the granite gray. 
From pyramid, temple, and treasured dead 

We vainly ask tor her wisdom's plan ; 
Theytell of the slave and tyrant's dread- 
Vet there was hope when that day began. 
The Chaldee came with his starry lore. 

That built up Babylon's crown and creed ; 
And bricks were stamped on the Tigris* store 

With signs which our sages scarce can read. 
From Nidus' temple and Nimrod'a tower 

The rule of the old East's empire spread— 
Unreasoning faith and unquestioned power. 

But still, Is it come ? the watcher said. 
The light of the Persian's worshipped flame 

On ancient bondage its splendor threw ; 
And once on the West a sunrise came. 

When Greece to her freedom's trust was true. 
With dreams to the utmost ages dear, 

With human gods and with godlike men, 
No marvel the far-off day seemed near 

To eyes that looked through her laurels then. 
The Roman conquered and reveled, too, 

Till honor, and faith, and power was gone ; 
And deeper old Europe's darkness grew 

As wave after wave the Goth came on. 
The gown was learning, the sword was law, 

The people served in the oxen's stead ; 
But ever some gleam the watcher saw, t 

And overcome, Is it come ? they said. 
Poet and Seer that question caught 

Above the din of life's fear and frets ; 
It marched with letters— it toiled with thought, 

Through schools and creeds which the earth forgets ; 
And statesmen trifle, and priests deceive, 

And traders barter our world away ; 
Yet hearts to that golden promise cleave, 

And Btill, at times, Is it come ? they say. 
The days of the nations bear no trace 

Of all the sunshine so far foretold ; 
The cannon speaks in the teacher's place— 

The age is weary with work and gold: — 
And high hopes wither, and memories wane — 

On hearths and altars the fires are dead ; 
But that brave faith hath not lived in vain:— 

And this is all our watcher said. 

Frances Brovm in the London Atheneeum. 



BANKS. 



ELECTRICITY, ETC. 

— An accident of a peculiar character is reported as having occurred 
recently at Brighton, England. While the members of the local volun- 
teer fire brigade were proceeding to a fire with their escape, it came in 
contact with the electric light wire overhead, and the current descending 
the wirework of the eBcape caused those volunteers who had control to 
Ioobo their hold. Another member, thinking the machine was falling, 
grasped the steering rod, and received the full force of the shock, which 
was so powerful as to bend him double, and disable him for upwards of an 
hour. 

— In a recent communication to the Socie'te' des Ecoles d'Arts et 
Metiers, M. J. Chretien states that the first attempt to transmit motive 
power by electricity was made at the Vienna Exhibition in 1873 by M. 
H. Fontaine. M. Chretien thinks that it is safe to calculate upon the 
transmission of 50 per cent, of the whole power. Solar heat, he thinks, 
when transformed into electricity, seems to offer a more desirable solution 
of the problem than its direct application to the production of steam. 

^— During the festivities at Henley-on-Thames, England, consequent 
on the recent regatta, amongst other things there was to be seen a "round- 
about " lighted up, not by the ordinary naphtha lamps, but by two elec- 
tric arc lamps. This is speculating in electric light with some prospect of 
a speedy and remunerative return. 

^— The Electrician states that the reports that have appeared in the 
daily press stating that the bombardment at Alexandria recently, was 
heard at Malta by means of a telephone connected with the Malta-Alex- 
andria cable are inaccurate. 

— The title under which the entire telegraph system of the Domin- 
ion of Canada has been amalgamated is that of the Great North Western 
Telegraph Company . 

BRITISH POWER 

The Economist thinks the Alexandria victory shows that a great in- 
crease has recently occured in British readiness for war, and that since 1815 
Great Britain has never been so well equipped, with so little strain upon 
her resources, as she is now. The fleet which has destroyed fortresses de- 
fended by 1,000 well-Berved heavy guns was lesB than a month fitting out, 
while no draft was made on the Asiatic or other remote squadrons. More- 
over, a reserve squadron is quite ready as a reinforcement if necessary, 
while many large ships of great strength are ready for commissioning. 

For the army, a garrison of 35,000 men has to be kept in Ireland, but a 
complete corps cTarmee of 25,000 men was ready on July 15 to be shipped 
to Egypt. Another of the same strength would be ready in four days, 
and in two weeks a third could be prepared. On an emergency a fourth 
corps could be got ready also ; but, omitting this, there is a force of 70,000 
men ready if required, and not counting an Indian army corps which 
holds itself in readiness. 



THE BANK OF CALIFORNIA, SAN FRANCISCO. 

Capital $3,000,000. 

WM.ALTORD Prnldent. 

THOMAS BROWN, Cashier | B. Ml KKAY, Jr., Am** Cashier 

Agents: 

New York, Agency of the Bank of Calfornla ; Boston, Treroonl National Bank 
Chicago. Union National Bank ; St. Louis, Boatman's Saving Bank ; Now Zealand, 
the Bank of Now Zealand. Correspondent in London, Messrs. N. M. Rothschild A 
Song. Correspondent* in India, China, Japan and Australia, the Oriental Bank Cor- 
poration. 

The Bank has Agencies at Virginia City, and Correspondent* in all the princi- 
pal Mining Districts and Interior Towns of the Pacific Coast 

Letters of Credit issued, available in all parts of the world. Draw direct on Lon- 
don, Dublin, Paris, Berlin, Bremen, Hamburg, Krai ikfort-un -the- Main, Antwerp, 
Amsterdam, St. Petersburg!}, Copenhagen, Stockholm, Christiana, Locarno, Mel- 
bourne, Sydney, Auckland, Hongkong, Shanghai, Yukuhama. Nov. 4. 

BANK OF BRITISH COLUMBIA. 

Incorporated by Boyal Charier.— Capital paid up, fjl,800,- 
000, with power to increase to $10,000,000. Southeast corner California and San- 
BomeBtreets. Head Office— 28 Comhill, London. Branches — Portland, Oregon; Vic- 
toria, New Westminster and Cariboo, British Columbia. 

This Bank transacts a General Banking Business. Accounts opened subject to Check 
and Special Deposits received. Commercial Credits granted available in al parts of 
the world. Approved Bills discounted and advances made on good collateral security. 
Draws direct at current rates upon its Head Office and Branches, and upon Its Agents 
as follows : 

New York, Chicago and Canada— Bank of Montreal ; Liverpool— North and South 
Wales Bank ; Scotland —British Linen Company ; Ireland— Bank of Ireland ; Mex- 
ico and South America — London Bank of Mexico and South America ; China and 
Japan— Chartered Bank of India, Australia and China, and Oriental Bank ; Australia 
and New Zealand — Bank of Australasia, Commercial Banking Company of Sydney, 
English, Scottish and Australian Chartered Bank, and Colonial Bank, Panama. 

May 18. FREDEKICK TOWNSEND, Manager. 

FIRST NATIONAL GOLD BANK OF SAN FRANCISCO, CAL. 

Paid up Capital 81,500,000, Gold. President, B.C. Wool- 
worth Vice-President, D. Callaghan ; Cashier, E. D. Morgan. 

Directors :— R. C. Wootworth, D. Callaghan, C. G. Hooker, George A. Low, Peter 
Donahue, Isaac Wonnser, James Phelan, James Momtt, N. Van Bergen. 

Correspondents — London : Baring Bros. & Co. Bank of Montreal, No. 9 Birchin 
Lane, Lombard street. Dublin : Provincial Bank of Ireland. Hamburg : Hesse, 
Neuman &Co. Paris: Hottinguer&Co. NewYork: National Bank of Commerce. Bos- 
ton : Blackstone National Bank. Chicago : First National Bank. This Bank is pre- 
pared to transact a general Banking business. Deposits in Gold, Silver and Currency 
received subject to check or on special deposit. Exchange for sale on the principal 
cities of the United States, Great Britain, Ireland and the Continent. Commercia 
Credits issued available in Europe, Chii.a and Japan. Collections attended to and 
prompt returns made at the lowest market rates of Exchange. Jan. 19. 

LONDON AND SAN FRANCISCO BANK, LIMITED. 

Capital, $2,100,000. 

San Francisco Office, 424 California street; London Office, 
22 Old Broad street. Portland Branch, Ainsworth's Building. Manager, 
ARTHUR SCRIVENER; Assistant Manager, WILLIAM STEEL. London Bankers, 
Bank of England and London Joint Stock Bank; New York, Drexel, Morgan & 
Co. ; Boston, Third National Bank. This Bank is prepared to transact all kinds 
of General Banking and Exchange Business in London and San Francisco, and 
between said cities and all parts of the world. Oct. 9. 

THE NEVADA BANK OF SAN FRANCISCO. 

Capital Paid TTp »3,000,000. 

Reserve, IT. S. Bonds 4.000,000. 

Agency at New York, 63 Wall street. 
Agency at Virginia, Ifev. 

Buys and sells Exchange and Telegraphic Transfers. Issues Commercial and Trav- 
elers'* Credits. This Bank has special facilities for dealing in Bullion. Nov. 8. 

THE ANQLO-CALIFORNIAN BANK, LIMITED. 

N.E. Cor. Sansome and Pine Streets. 

London Office, 3 Angel Con rt ; New York Agents, J. W. Sel- 
igman & Co., 21 Broad street. Authorized Capital Stock, 86,000,000. Will re- 
ceive Deposits, open Accounts, make Collections, buy and sell Exchange and Bullion, 
loan Money, and issue Letters of Credit available throughout the world. 

FRED. F. LOW, IGN. STEINHART, Managers. 
P. N. Lilibntual, Cashier. Sept. 13. 

SECURITY SAVINGS BANK. 

GUARANTEE CAPITAL, $800,000. 

Officers: Vice-President. Jerome Lincoln; Secretary, W. 
S. Jones ; Attorney, Sidney V. Smith. Loans made on Real Estate and other 
Approved Securities. Office : No. 216 Sansome street, San Francisco. Oct. 14. 

THE GERMAN SAVINGS AND LOAN SOCIETY. 

Deutsche Spar and Leihbank, So 526 Calirornlastreet.San 
Francisco. Officers ; President, L. GOTTIG. Board of Directors.— Fred. 
Roeding, Chas. Kohler, Edw. Kruso, George H. Eggers, N. Van Bergen, H. L. Simon, 
Peter Spreckela, Ign. Steinhart. Secretary, GEO. LETTE ; Attorney, JOHN R. 
JARBOE. May 18. 

SELBY SMELTING AND LEAD COMPANY, 

416 Montgomery Street San Franoiaoo. 

Gold and Silver Hennery and Assay Office. 

Highest Prices Paid Tor* Gold, Silver and Lead Ores and Sulphurets. Manufac- 
turers ol BLUESTONE. Also, Lead Pipe, Sheet Lead, Shot, etc. This Company 
has the hest facilities on the Coast for working GOLD, SILVER and LEAD in their 
various forms. 

June is. PRENTISS SELBY, Superintendent. 



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